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The Wonder of Steel

The Wonder of Steel | Local World | Scoop.it

When we say that Superman is a 'man of steel', we mean, of course, that he is strong - so strong that he can bounce bullets from his chest. So strong that he is able to lift and bend any material. So strong that he is invincible!

 

Steel is the metal we choose in this instance because of it is one of the strongest known to man. As a result, its what we use for anything that needs to be extremely tough or impenetrable, from bank vaults to bearings in cars, ships, and airplanes; from buildings and infrastructure to everyday tools such as knives, and appliances such as your refrigerator.

 

Steel is an alloy of iron, carbon, and trace elements silicon, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur. Elements such as chromium and nickel may be added in order to create ‘stainless steel’ which can withstand rust. Sheffield Steel cutlery is particularly well known and still in use today.

 

Steel has a high tensile strength, meaning it has a high capacity for withstanding heavy loads without breaking.

 

Surprisingly, there are roughly 3,500 grades of steel, with three quarters of these having been developed over the past 20 years. Cars, for instance, are made with new steels that are up to 35% lighter than steels used to make older vehicles. Carbon steel, alloy steel, and tool steel, are some of the most common steels in everyday use.

 

We have been using it since around 200 BC, though it was first mass produced thanks to the British inventor Henry Bessemer in the 1850s. He created the first techniques which allowed steel to be produced in great quantities at very low, affordable prices.

 

Like Superman, he is sometimes called ‘Man of Steel’, therefore!

 

Steel is easily recyclable, because it is highly magnetic and therefore east to collect up from general waste. No matter how many times it is recycled, it remains the same and retains all of its qualities - a fact which cannot be said of every metal or material.

 

Truly, steel is a most remarkable metal. And that why any description or idiom containing it is undoubtedly positive e.g. nerves of steel’, ‘steely gaze’, and so on. ‘Steel’ equals strength, and it is to be found, in our world, everywhere.

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How To Remove Rust From Metal Objects

With elbow grease, rust can be removed from metal surfaces. From baking soda to potatoes, we've got you covered (but not in rust) with these 5 methods.
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What Is A Genius?

What Is A Genius? | Local World | Scoop.it

‘Genius’ is a generic term which most of use, from time to time, to denote something or someone that seems extremely bright and intelligent. However, the term itself is subject to debate and contains within it a plethora of different meanings. There is, for instance, an ‘IQ genius’, someone who has an IQ that is far above average. A genius IQ score is considered one which is over 160 on standard IQ tests. However, it is hotly debated as to whether the gifted artist Pablo Picasso was a genius or not, and the eminent scientist Stephen Hawking is regarded merely as a ‘luminary’. Intellectual ability is one thing, but what about emotional intelligence? Those with high IQ are often considered to have low EQ. In any case, you can keep your own smarts sharpened by always learning, keeping an open mind, and playing games such as 数独 (Sudoku in Japanese).

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Donald Trump Gets Torched On Twitter Over Abraham Lincoln Comparison

Donald Trump Gets Torched On Twitter Over Abraham Lincoln Comparison | Local World | Scoop.it
"How stable can a genius get?"...
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Photos: How Team Penske uses 3D printing to build its IndyCar and NASCAR vehicles

Photos: How Team Penske uses 3D printing to build its IndyCar and NASCAR vehicles | Local World | Scoop.it
The team uses technology from Stratasys to 3D print carbon fiber parts for the cars.
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How to scale blockchain tech to the enterprise

How to scale blockchain tech to the enterprise | Local World | Scoop.it
Though enterprise adoption will be slow the blockchain could fundamentally change almost every aspect of the enterprise, says po.et CEO Jarrod Dicker.
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Urban Explorer: London

Urban Explorer: London | Local World | Scoop.it

An urban explorer is someone who explores towns and cities instead of foreign lands, deserts, or jungles. The deep blue sea isn't their calling: it's the deep grey urban, especially its 'lost' and long forgotten buildings, tunnels, travel routes, and more.


London in particular is a great place for urban exploration, due to its incredibly long history. As one of the world's oldest cities, there are layers and layers of construction, civilization, and demolition within its sprawling mass, and it is very much worth a day trip here if you're keen to discover more about these fascinating facets of its history.

 

Serious urban explorers are also sometimes called ‘place hackers’, and they dress appropriate to the occasion, in lightweight trainers, protective clothing, climbing gear, and even helmets. They may employ heavy duty torches or night vision goggles. But for most of us, just making sure to wear appropriate footwear and loose, comfortable clothing suitable for walking as well as typical London weather is enough.

 

Before you go exploring, you need to decide where you are going to and to research not just how to get there, but how to get in there. Some derelict buildings may be boarded up and patrolled, so these ones are strictly off limits. Others are accessible but in bad repair, so caution must be taken. You need to make sure your chosen abandoned or derelict site is suitable for visitors, and that you are not breaking any laws by being there.

 

Due to the industrial revolution, there are a large number of abandoned factories and manufacturing warehouses in London. As a vibrant hub of entertainment, there are also many old cinemas and theatres, including the largest post-war cinema in the UK, Odeon Marble Arch, which was built back in 1967. There are also a fair number of hospitals, pubs, public baths, post offices, and more. Sites such as Derelict London keep lists of buildings and areas that you can use to plan your exploration.

 

You can probably see at least two different venues if you plan your trip to, or around, London well in advance. If home is across the city or even outside it, then booking a dayroom via daybreakhotels.com is highly recommended, as it allows you to rest, freshen up, shower, change clothes, etc. in between explorations or even after them, in which case the option of a dinner plus dayroom is a good idea. You’ll deserve it, after all that time spent exploring, too.

Also vital is to take a camera. Since urban exploration can sometimes involve clambering and climbing over things, make sure you keep this on a strap, but don’t forget it because you are bound to see some spectacular sights with this incredible and very exciting pastime.

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Travel-Friendly Pet Passports : pet passport

Travel-Friendly Pet Passports : pet passport | Local World | Scoop.it
pet passport - As keen owners are rigorously managing social profiles on behalf of their beloved furry companions, tracking the mileage on pet passports proves to...
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Color Vibe 2018

Color Vibe 2018 | Local World | Scoop.it

Have you heard of ‘Color Vibe'?

 

This is a typical 5 kilometer run in various US cities, but with one unusual difference - as people race, spectacular colored powder is blasted at runners from ‘color stations’ dotted along the race course. Composed of chalk, the powdery explosions come in a range of vivid rainbow colors, and are partly inspired by the legendary Indian ‘Festival of Color’, also known as Holi. Color Vibe is intended for participants of all ages, so you can run with friends and family, including children, if you’d like to. Color Vibe has held over 400 events with over 1,000,000 participants and spectators enjoying them. So, why not try it? After the race you are bound to miss the amazing immersion in color, so be sure to download a coloring app such as Color By Numbers on your phone before you head on down.

 

Enjoy yourself!

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Windows 10 Maps update offers more detailed directions for business travelers

Windows 10 Maps update offers more detailed directions for business travelers | Local World | Scoop.it
New updates from the Windows 10 Maps app makes functionality more user-friendly. Here's what to expect.
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11 Artificial Intelligence Events to Make Time for in 2018 [UPDATED]

11 Artificial Intelligence Events to Make Time for in 2018 [UPDATED] | Local World | Scoop.it
Session and registration details for 11 top artificial intelligence events featuring experts from companies like Google, IBM, and Amazon....
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227: 3 Travel Bloggers Share their Stories and Tips

227: 3 Travel Bloggers Share their Stories and Tips | Local World | Scoop.it
3 Travel Bloggers Share Their Tips and Stories
Once again I'm handing the podcast over to you, our listeners, to share your stories and tips of starting and growing your blogs.



I started this series towards the end of last year with episode 2...
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NASA's unsung heroes: The Apollo coders who put men on the moon

NASA's unsung heroes: The Apollo coders who put men on the moon | Local World | Scoop.it
Learn how pioneering software engineers helped NASA launch astronauts into space, and bring them back again--pushing the boundaries of technology as they did it.
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Watch how 140-year-old Clyde viaduct will be jacked up without disrupting trains - Daily Record

The 90-metre steel structure is having £1.6 million spent on it to upgrade bearings - and the first one is being replaced tomorrow....
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British Steel to axe almost 1 in 10 jobs | Business | The Guardian

British Steel to axe almost 1 in 10 jobs | Business | The Guardian | Local World | Scoop.it
Steelmaker blames weak pound and euro but pledges not to close plants...
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Gut Bridge | American Institute of Steel Construction

Gut Bridge | American Institute of Steel Construction | Local World | Scoop.it
National Award Winner – Movable Bridge Working on a project site about the size of two football fields was just one of the challenges for the team working on the Gut Bridge. A double counterweight design allowed the structure to fit within the site while blending seamlessly into the surrounding town. “A beautiful bridge and an elegant solution. The use of the double counterweight was a very creative way to save space and provide a solution that fits the site while providing functionality,” said Frank Russo, PE, PhD, Michael Baker International, a judge in the competition.
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Google Car project history

Google Car project history | Local World | Scoop.it
Waymo, formerly the Google Car project, is almost ten years old. After more than 8 million self-driving miles, Waymo is preparing to commercialize in 2018...
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The 3 reasons CIOs have become cloud-first

The 3 reasons CIOs have become cloud-first | Local World | Scoop.it
The move to a cloud-first strategy is being shaped by drivers that we did not originally anticipate—certainly not for cost reasons...
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HubSpot Launches Seventh Global Office in Berlin, Europe’s Fastest-Growing Tech City

HubSpot Launches Seventh Global Office in Berlin, Europe’s Fastest-Growing Tech City | Local World | Scoop.it
HubSpot celebrated today the launch of its new Berlin office and Frankfurt data center, solidifying its commitment to supporting the booming DACH market....
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Luton Airport: 'Painful' or 'stress-free'?

Luton Airport: 'Painful' or 'stress-free'? | Local World | Scoop.it
The airport has come bottom of a passenger satisfaction survey for the third year running.
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Ryanair Introduces New and Incredibly Confusing Baggage Fees

Ryanair Introduces New and Incredibly Confusing Baggage Fees | Local World | Scoop.it
If you're flying Ryanair anytime soon, you'll want to make sure you understand its new baggage rules and fees.
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The seven best alternatives to overcrowded Barcelona

The seven best alternatives to overcrowded Barcelona | Local World | Scoop.it
Explore Parc Guell, stroll through the cloisters of its Gothic cathedral, or visit Gaudi’s spectacular unfinished Sagrada Familia, and one thing will become painfully obvious. Barcelona is full. Sightseeing in the city, as this reporter can attest, gets more stressful with each passing year. The Catalan capital has become a victim of its own popularity. And it isn’t just the queues and crowds at key attractions. The influx of tourists - annual arrivals have risen by 25 per cent in four years to more than 34 million (in a city with just 1.6 million residents) - is affecting locals too. Last week The Telegraph reported that residents were at the end of their tether, driven to the brink by “noise emanating from crammed tourist flats, the early hours brawling and public urination, and the drug paraphernalia frequently found in the children’s playground”. Authorities are trying to tackle the issue. New hotels are being put on hold and rental firms are facing curbs, but locals say more action is needed. “People cannot rest,” said Manel Martinez, vice-president of the Barceloneta Neighbours’ Association. “Many residents are leaving the barrio - people who were born here - because they cannot go on living like this.” So what can you do to help? If you’re determined to visit Barcelona (and, given its great food and reliable sunshine, we can hardly blame you) then try going out of season. “Winter can throw up some azure skies and improbably warm days,” says our expert to the city, Sally Davies. Consider skipping the “bucket list” attractions in favour of something lesser known. The city sits in the shadow of the Serra de Collserola, for example, one of Europe’s biggest urban parks. Trails lead through woodland with a spectacular variety of plants, birds and small animals. Take a picnic, or have lunch in the village of Vallvidrera. Or simply leave the guidebook behind and improvise your own itinerary.  Or else ditch Barcelona entirely in favour of an equally beguiling - but far less oversubscribed - alternative. These are our favourites. Five options in Spain Girona A few low-cost airlines that claim to serve Barcelona actually fly to Girona, some 60 miles to the north. Avoid the transfer and spend your holiday in this lesser-known Catalan city instead. “The ancient walled city of Girona, perched on a hillside in northern Catalonia, is often viewed as Barcelona in miniature,” says Jake Brown, writing for Telegraph Travel. “It’s an ideal day trip en route to Costa Brava beaches, Pyrenees ski resorts or from Barcelona, all of which are an hour away by car. But Girona rewards a longer stay. You won’t be the first to find the city, with its millennia of cultural and culinary heritage. From the River Onyar, its labyrinthine old town streets twist up in a beguiling mix of architectural styles, dominated by the cathedral.” Keen cyclists will be delighted to discover it is a popular base for many professional racers – the ride to Rocacorba is a must. It is also home to El Cellar de Can Roca, the world’s second best restaurant. La Coruna Barcelona does art and beaches like no other Spanish city. Except perhaps La Coruna. Telegraph Travel’s Chris Leadbeater explains: “Lurking in the north-west corner of Spain, this Galician port soothes its scuffed, salty soul on a pair of glorious urban beaches – Playa del Orzan and Playa de Riazor – that teem with life on hot summer days. Its cramped medieval lanes are abuzz with tapas bars, while its Museo de Belas Artes is an underrated nugget of visual wonder which boasts sketches by Spanish romantic Goya.” San Sebastian This Basque gem is hardly undiscovered – but it gets far fewer visitors than Barcelona. And it might just be the only Spanish city with a better beach – and finer food. La Concha, its wide sweep of sand, has been named Europe’s best beach by TripAdvisor users, while of its culinary delights, Andy Lynes, our gourmet travel expert, says: “This upmarket seaside resort town has food and drink running through its veins with it’s thrilling pinxto (Basque-style tapas) bar scene, sociedades gastronómicas (private dining clubs) and superb seafood, as well as being surrounded by vineyards making the local Txacoli wine and sagardotegias (cider houses) dotted around the nearby hills.”  Cadiz Another seaside beauty, albeit at the opposite end of the country.   “Founded more than 3,000 years ago by the Phoenicians, the old part of the city is at the end of a peninsula and shaped like a fist,” says Annie Bennett. “You are never more than a mile from the sea, which is always discernible in the golden light shimmering at the end of the long, straight streets, flanked by stone mansions painted in pastel tones of pink, green and blue. “The tempting smell of fish frying wafts from every bar. Order a glass of chilled manzanilla sherry, the colour of straw, made just down the coast in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and some tortillitas de camarones – featherlight fritters speckled with the tiniest shrimps – and maybe some sea urchins or anemones if you’re feeling adventurous.” Zaragoza There are options in neighbouring region of Aragón, too. Annie Bennett explains: “West of Catalonia, you enter the vast region of Aragón. The town of Teruel, with its astonishing Mudéjar architecture, the pretty villages of Albarracín and Alqúezar, and the Ordesa National Park, are just a few of the things to see in this undervisited part of the country. And you can fly direct to the capital, Zaragoza, with Ryanair.” Zaragoza itself is the hometown of the artist Goya. “He is the city’s favourite son,” says Nick Trend. “His statue presides over the main square, while his bust stands proud in the courtyard of the Museo Goya. In the great Basilica del Pilar there are two of Goya’s ceiling frescoes, the Museo de Zaragoza has a good gallery of his portraits, and the Museo Diocesano de Zaragoza has one obscure Goya portrait – that of archbishop Joaquín Company – but it’s an intriguing museum in its own right, with a good collection of medieval paintings.” And two just beyond its borders Tavira, Portugal To glimpse what the Algarve looked like before mass tourism, head to Tavira, says Helen Pickles. “Straddling the Gilão river, it exudes an authentic Portuguese charm. Big hotels are few, churches are many, fishing boats crowd the water and everyone has time to dawdle.” Rabat, Morocco Often overlooked as a holiday destination, Rabat feels more than a bit European – it’s certainly a far cry from the madness of Marrakech. Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, the capital is feted for its urban design – which incorporates Islamic architecture and more modernist buildings – as well as a thriving culinary scene and stunning weather.
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Tesla's Autopilot: Cheat sheet

Tesla's Autopilot: Cheat sheet | Local World | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about Tesla's onboard computer system called Autopilot, and the company's plans for a self-driving car.
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4 Reasons Melbourne Should Be on Your Travel Bucket List

4 Reasons Melbourne Should Be on Your Travel Bucket List | Local World | Scoop.it
If Australia is on your travel radar, make sure Melbourne on the list. It’s the country’s second largest city, after Sydney. The stunning landscape, rich culture, and dazzling ambiance of Melbourne are just a few reasons why it also consistently ranks as one of the world’s most liveable city.
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Social Media Listening Uncovers Best and Worst Airlines

Social Media Listening Uncovers Best and Worst Airlines | Local World | Scoop.it
Synthesio's Social Media Listening Platform helps determine which airlines are the best and worst according to geographically based social data.
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