Will learn about care of natural things in the immediate environment
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Will learn about care of natural things in the immediate environment
ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments
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Mama Miti

Mama Miti | Will learn about care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it

Children's Picture Book:

 

MAMA MITI by Donna Jo Napoli & Kadir Nelson

Wangari Maathai and the trees of Kenya

 

 

Charlotte McKid's insight:

This vibrant children’s picture book is a colourful artwork of illustrations that bring the story of Wangari Maathai to life through layers of multi-textured collages capturing the spirit and culture of Kenya through the landscape, people and its colour. Wangari Maathai is said to have changed Kenya tree by tree and as a result of her devotion to the replanting of trees in Kenya through the ‘Green Belt Movement’, which brought life back to the suffering Kenyan countryside due to destructive agricultural practises.

The story is an effective resource for teaching children the impact depletion of the environment has on the people and their health. Inspiring students to take charge of their environment by active participation in its conservation. Wangari Maathai is an example of an individual making a difference through a simple idea to start planting trees.  A formative oral assessment can be conducted through individual student involvement in a class discussion and mind mapping activity based on the story with responses to questions such as;

-What caused the changes to the Mama Miti’s local environment in  Kenya?

-What did Mama Miti do to help the environment and her community?

- Identification of characteristics of their own environment, suggestions for changes and ideas of how they can contribute individually to its care and protection.

Using Manly school location as an example, a focus will be placed on the significance of the beaches to their community. A discussion of the effect a contaminated beach would have on their lifestyle, with the inability to go swimming or surfing, the effect on the sea life and how people such as the lifeguards wouldn’t be able to attend work. Through this class discussion students are encouraged to identify how they can participate in beach conservation by e.g. not littering, being cautious of what they pour down the sink and other aspects of environmental awareness. This activity is a way of connecting such a story as Wangari Maathai's to that of their own lives, and providing an opportunity to relate their own personal experiences to wider societal issues through a global perspective, drawing on the similarities and differences (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 100). 

 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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Today I Collected

Creating art from used objects from a 'collector kit' of daily waste items. 

Charlotte McKid's insight:

‘Today I Collected’ is a project conducted by an artist in Rotterdam to create a ‘Collector Kit’, which will be used to promote awareness to children to take care of what surrounds them. The artist collects everyday objects that have been discarded or no longer have a use, transforming them into materials to create new objects of art, where the waste object is given new meaning, life and purpose.

This project will start with setting up a recycling system in the classroom weeks prior to the creating activity, in order to build a class ‘collector kit’ which will form the material base.  A class lesson on the process of recycling will be required for the students understanding of the distribution of waste materials into different recycling categories eg plastic opposed to cardboard. The ‘collector kit’ will be used in a creative exercise to design and construct objects like the examples on ‘Today I Collected’ blog page. This activity is designed to develop an awareness in the way waste objects and materials can be recycled, and reused, and therefore reducing the use of resources and the production of waste. Forming an awareness of the terms ‘Recycling, Reducing and Reusing’ and the effect these processes have on the environment by encouraging students to actively participate in the exercise of doing is significant to their understanding of how they can actively contribute to the care for their immediate environment.

This activity can be linked to other key learning areas such as the Mathematics Syllabus outcomes MES1.1, MES1.2, MES1.3, MES1.4 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, pp. 92-102) using the objects collected such as bottles, boxes, and other forms of packaging and discarded objects to describe and compare the length, area, volume and capacity using everyday language. This can be aided by activities such as tracing, filling with sand, or water to make conclusions as to which objects are tall, short, wider, the same as, have more, are empty, is half-full and what objects take up more space then others. 

 

NSW Board of Studies, (2006). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

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Stop the Destruction

The main causes of natural habitat destruction.
Charlotte McKid's insight:

The resource is a simple graphical representation of the main causes of natural destruction. To build on the understanding that caring for natural elements in your immediate environment can have a greater effect and contribute to the future. Each of the causes are represented in a single symbolic illustration. This is a simple way to visually explain to early stage one the greater effects of caring for your environment. The concepts are complicated although this is a tool to simply explain the general ideas behind each of the contributing factors using visual aids.

Using the symbols as a model, the students are to create their own graphic representations of the ways in which they care for natural things at home, at school and in their local community (e.g. including but not limited to the notions of recycling, reusing, reducing, water conservation, planting gardens, clean up Australia day, waste disposal, clean streets, parks, waterways, beaches). The exercise is open to interpretation to express what the individual perceives as significant and how they personally can care for it. The symbols can be graphically represented through a diverse range of methods through the use of computer aided programs, collage, drawing, painting etc.

Students will be assessed on how well they understand that certain actions can harm the natural environment and how they personally can reduce the harm of natural things by considering the ways in which they interact and care for their immediate environment, and the ways in which they use technology or other means to graphically represent their ideas and understanding. This activity can be linked to the English Syllabus outcome RES1.7 and WES1.9 through demonstrating an emerging awareness of the use of written and visual texts to convey meaning, using visuals to communicate ideas, and drawing software to create pictures (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp. 32-36). 

 

NSW Board of Studies (2007). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

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Natasha Grogan - The Sage Garden featuring on The Design Files

Natasha Grogan - The Sage Garden featuring on The Design Files | Will learn about care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it

Planting Seedlings video clip - how to plant a vegetable garden from scratch

Charlotte McKid's insight:

The Designfiles blog featuring The Sage Garden is an inspirational and informative resource for teachers. Natasha shows how children of all ages can be involved and engaged in experiential learning through the activity of growing their own vegetable garden. The video clip ‘Planting Seedlings’ explains the planting process step by step while Natasha and five primary aged children plant a range of plants from scratch.

The film clip could be used as a demonstration of the planting process before planting a classroom garden. This activity will assess students understanding of the fragility of the natural environment, how plants are living elements that require water, food and light to survive. It is a practical exercise where the students are learning by doing to improve their knowledge, awareness and sense of stewardship toward environmental conservation and a connectedness to the world through participation in a class garden project (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 143-144). A positive contribution to the school community. There are a broad range of lessons that can be taught through growing plants in a classroom such as the life cycle, where food comes from, who grows it, and the science behind how it grows.

This practical activity can be linked to other key learning areas such as English Syllabus outcome TES1.1 and TES1.2 (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp. 20-22) through listening, following instructions, and working in a group. The garden activity could form the basis for a theme in literacy activities such as new vocabulary, spelling and other writing, and reading activities. 

 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

 

 

NSW Board of Studies (2007). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

 

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The Rainbow Serpent

The Rainbow Serpent a significant motif in Aboriginal culture and dreaming.

Charlotte McKid's insight:

The YouTube resource is a short film adaptation of the well-known dreamtime story, based on the children’s picture book ‘The Rainbow Serpent’ by Dick Roughsey, of the Lardil people from Mornington Island. The story is a cultural explanation of the creation of land, water, and life featuring the rainbow serpent, a significant motif in the Indigenous culture. This version of the story is presented visually through symbolic illustrations, and music. The story is an effective starting point to highlight the significance of the natural environment, our connection and coexistence, the relationship between people and place. In reference to the text in the final scene of the story, “leaving us the people with our brothers, the plants and animals to look after’, offers a sense of responsibility that we have as individuals to care for our natural environment.

Using Steven’s six key concepts as a guide for developing Indigenous perspectives on the topic including; land, relationship, place, time, language, and culture to be embedded into the lesson (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp.388-389). The resource is a cultural representation of the past, and it is critical to incorporate present and future perspectives into the lesson (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 389), as “Culture is representative of ways of being. Culture is not merely heritage” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 389).  As is Time, Land and Place are significant aspect of the topic and the traditional Indigenous country which the institution is situated is an integral part of the lessons as a local, regional, national and global perspective are to be considered (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 387).  Using Manly, Sydney as an example the acknowledgement and study is to be focused around the Cammeraygal Land and its people, part of the Eora Nation of the Sydney Basin. 

 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

 

Roughsey, D. (1975). The Rainbow Serpent. Sydney: Collins.

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