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Fairtrade Australia | Fairtrade Australia & New Zealand

Fairtrade Australia | Fairtrade Australia & New Zealand | Livin' La Vida HSIE! | Scoop.it
Lewis McKeown's insight:

Fairtrade is an organisation that aims to improve the lives of farmers and workers in the developing world with a focus on environmentally sustainable practices. This is achieved through putting pressure on companies in wealthy nations to pay sustainable prices for goods and materials to poor nations in order to address the inherent injustices of conventional global trade practices. In return, the companies receive fairtrade certification and public acknowledgement/good will. According to the website 600 million people in 70 countries now benefit from fairtrade sustainable pricing which in turn helps protect them against global market fluctuations, helps reduce child labour as a result of inadequate adult pay in families, gives an incentive for environmentally sustainable and safer work conditions, and encourages local investment in infrastructure such as medical services and schools.

 

The site also provides excellent case studies on producers of products such as teach, coffee, sugar, cocoa, cotton and sports balls in a variety of countries that are particularly relevant to Australia in terms of trade patterns (such as South East Asia and South Asia). The studies provide information on the poor conditions that these people face and the benefits that fairtrade has since provided, including pictures and videos.  

 

Suggested activity:

 

The fairtrade website would be an ideal resource for a global perspective linking with the HSIE syllabus outcomes SS3.7 and SS3.8, which are concerned with Australian people, systems and communities, global interconnections and responsibilities, as well as notions of Australian’s values of fairness and social justice (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.60). More specifically, students engaging with the content would have an opportunity to grasp that they are global citizens, and that interdependences and choices of consumption have real economic, environmental and social consequences (Browett & Ashman, 2011, p.41). A great research activity could be found in students identifying the origins of common household products and recording this on a world map, as well as identifying whether the products are fairtrade or not (pp.44-45). Students can also engage with the fairtrade website’s search function that allows them to find fairtrade products in their local area.

 

Sources:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Browett, J. & Ashman, G. (2011). Thinking Globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom. Australia: Education Services Australia.

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UNITE THE UNION, About Trade Unions by Jamie-Max Caldwell - YouTube

 

I created this video to explain what a trade union is. Follow me #mightyjambug or email jamie-maxcaldwell@hotmail.co.uk Join Unite or for more info go to www...

Lewis McKeown's insight:

Cartoon Animation:

 

Jamie-Max Caldwell’s (2012) ‘Unite the Union: About trade unions’ is time-lapse animation that explains what trade unions are, who they represent, and gives a brief history of their establishment in the UK. The animation, which is done on whiteboard with coloured markers, combines cartoon illustrations and text. It shows an artists hand drawing various scenarios on a white background before rubbing them out and moving onto the next scene.

 

In terms of the content the site outlines the unions current goals of fairer pay, better work conditions, opportunities for workers to educate themselves and upskill, and the equality for traditionally marginalised people such as the young, people with disabilities, LGBT people and people from ethnic minorities in the context of employment. It states that anyone has the right to join unions, including workers, students, apprentices, unemployed people and retired people, and provides a link to the ‘unite the union’ website (www.unitetheunion.org/) which is almost identical in terms of content to Australian unions (www.australianunions.org.au/). There is also a very brief history of the achievements of the UK union movement and some early photos and archival footage of their activities.

 

Teaching Resource – Ideal & Accessible for Students:

 

This animation provides a teaching resource for Stage 3 students in order to introduce them to this topic for a number of reasons. Firstly it presents simplified information in a format that is both familiar in the case of the whiteboard, yet creative and intriguing. Although the students my engage with the animation it is still very important that during the viewing the teacher make use of the pause button in order to clarify concepts and elicit student feedback on what the messages are (Maples et al, 2011, pp.77-78). The animation also makes a specific link between trade unionism in the UK and with other movements in countries all around over the world. This fits well with the Board of Studies NSW (2006) outcome SSS3.7, which is concerned with ‘Australian people, systems and communities [that] are globally interconnected…’. A comparison of the respective Australian and UK union movements would provide the basis to discussing the ‘dynamic global agenda’, and the opportunities offered by globalisation for worker activists made increasingly possible through ITC development in the last 30 years (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, pp.24-25).  

 

Sources:

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History Geography, econcomics and citizenship in the Australian Curriculum 5th Edition. Australia: ACARA.

 

Maples, J., Arndt, K., and White, J. M. Re-seeing the Mighty: Critically examining one film’s representations of disability in the English classroom. English Journal, 100(2), 77-85.

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ACTU Australian Unions

ACTU Australian Unions | Livin' La Vida HSIE! | Scoop.it
More and more, the demands of business are eating away at the basic rights unions have won for all of us. Time for family and friends, some certainty to plan for the future and a fair day's pay.

- See more at: http://www.australianunions.org.au/#sthash.c1m6YaP0.dpuf
Lewis McKeown's insight:

Unionism in Australia:

 

This site provides concise information on Australian unionism in an uncluttered, unconvoluted and easy to navigate format. It includes an overview of the philosophical standpoint of Australian unions (the call for collective action of workers in order to negotiate better pay and conditions) as well as practical assistance offered through expert advice on worker’s rights and legal assistance with problems. Viewers may also join a union, donate and/or show support for various featured campaigns and issues being fought for by the Australian Unions.

 

The site also provides a brief historical account of the achievements of the Australian workers since the establishment of the ACTU (Australian Council of Trade Unions) in 1927. Gains have occurred over a long period and in many cases are ongoing, such as: the establishment of the minimum wage; reasonable working hours; paid holidays; safer workplaces, universal superannuation; and ongoing gender pay equality in the workplace. The ACTU has also made significant contributions to post-war development migrant programs; the establishment of Medicare and our social security system; and universal paid parental leave.

 

Teaching & Learning Aspect:

 

In the context of the HSIE Stage 3 syllabus subject matter dot point: ‘organisations that support employers and workers, eg. associations, federations, unions’, this website is extremely relevant and aligns with the stage 3 HSIE outcome SSS3.8 (Roles, rights and responsibilities) (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, pp.60-61). More specifically, it could be used as an ideal spring-board by which students might begin to engage with and discuss ideas of the ‘structures, roles, responsibilities and decision-making process of State and federal governments…’ in relation to Australian’s values of ‘fairness and socially just principles’ in the workplace (p.60). Through the exploration of the site and the featured case studies students may begin critically examine assumptions of fairness in our society. Are there examples of governmental policies that result in ‘unfairness’ to workers? If so, who loses out? What do the student’s think about unions? Are they important or unimportant? This could take the form of a student small group fact-finding activity and role-play for the class explaining the issues they’ve uncovered. As well as providing a solid basis of understanding of Australian unions, this could also be linked to global perspectives surrounding unions, by which students may contrast and compare issues faced by workers in other parts of the world.

 

Sources:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

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AES Aboriginal Employment Strategy | A career Opportunity for every Indigenous Australian

Lewis McKeown's insight:

The Aboriginal Employment Agency (AES) is a Sydney based 100% Indigenous managed not-for-profit recruitment, traineeship and business development service designed for job candidates of Aboriginal and Torres Straight decent, as well as prospective employers of all backgrounds. The website also links to ‘Spearhead Careers’ (www.spearheadcareers.com.au/), a subsidiary of the AES specializing in providing similar opportunities and services for ‘skilled, experienced and talented Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people’ who would like to achieve progress in existing careers or action career change. Both these websites contain undergraduate and cadetship programs designed to place Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders who are on track to complete postgraduate studies into companies prior to their graduation.  

 

As well as employment/career services, Spearhead Careers offers ‘Aboriginal Culture Respect Training Workshops aimed at providing mutual understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander’s culture in all levels of employment in order to enhance and harmonise workplaces, work policies and work practices. These courses broadly cover cultural diversity within Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander groups, key histories and philosophies, and suggest strategies for building cultural awareness.

 

Suggested teaching idea:

 

These sites would be an excellent resource in linking with a Unit of Work on local Indigenous history and the evolution of their typical daily work practices and rituals prior to European invasion up until the present. As suggested by Taylor et al (2012) exploring the history of a local area is particularly engaging and suited to the primary curriculum due to timetable structuring. In examining local Aboriginal habitations and discussing the functioning of society and practices as told from an Aboriginal perspective (such as a guided tour and/or demonstration of traditional tools by an Indigenous historian) students may begin to understand the drastic changes that the lives of Aboriginals have undergone in the last 200 years (p.264). A teacher might also ponder the question as to why there is a job service solely for Aboriginal and Torres straight Islanders, and what historical events have led to its necessity in contemporary society.

 

Although the Board of Studies NSW (2008) Working With Aboriginal Communities Guide would need to consulted in detail I have selected two sections that I feel are of particular relevance here, including ‘2.5 localising the curriculum’ and ‘2.6 Links with Aboriginal organisations and government agencies’. These sections state the importance of not relying solely on texts which portray ‘only a national overview of Aboriginal history and culture’ as well as the benefits of providing experiences specific to local communities, preferably delivered by Indigenous people, in order to demonstrate cultural diversity and enhance the student learning experience (p.14).  

 

Sources:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2008). Working With Aboriginal Communities: Revised Edition 2008: A Community Guide to Community Consultation and Protocols. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Taylor, T., Boon, D., Kriewaldt, J. (2012). The permeable classroom. In T. Taylor, C. Fahey, J. Kriewaldt, & D. Boon (Eds.), Place and Time: Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. NSW: Pearson Australia.

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Home - Fair Work Ombudsman

Home - Fair Work Ombudsman | Livin' La Vida HSIE! | Scoop.it
Lewis McKeown's insight:

Government Structures, Roles and Responsibilities for Workers and Employers: 

 

This government website provides a good insight into the Australian government’s structural implementations, roles and responsibilities as outlined by the Board of Studies NSW (2006) in terms of ‘socially just principles’ in the Australian workplace, which tie into the Australian ethos of workplace ‘fairness’ (p.60). Although the site is fairly dense in terms of the amount of information it provides, it is user friendly and could help Stage 3 students become familiar with key terms and concepts in a simplified easy-to-grasp format. It also provides a platform where students can contrast and compare the rights and responsibilities of both workers and employers in Australia.

 

In regards to workers much of the information is broken up into numerous categories, including: part-time; casual; full time; apprentices; employees with disabilities; shift workers; and young workers to name a few, and this information relates to specific pay conditions relating to these. As well as this, there is information on universally applicable laws relating to protections from discrimination, dealing with complaints and the freedom of association with unions. For employers a lot of the information is similarly split into industry categories, such as: retail; construction and building; and plumbing etc. These categories outline industry specific obligations and laws, often with anecdotal examples. Advice for employers also includes dealing with complaints from workers, and the suggested steps in order to resolve issues before they result in government mediation or legal action.

 

Backward Design – Scaffolding around the UOW's 'Big Ideas':

 

The Fairwork website relates to Fahey’s (2012) concept of ‘backward design’, which relates to identifying key learning outcomes first before determining acceptable evidence and planning instruction (pp.173-174). This is because Fairwork provides teachers with a good scaffolding for building students understanding of the Australian government’s official role in creating a fair and socially just Australian workplace for both employer and employee alike, which is a key outcome (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.60). However, in further planning of a unit of work teachers could also expand on these concepts, finding alternative perspectives (such as exploring Australian union’s complaints of ‘unfairness’ how these relate to global union movements, all of which would help students gain a richer understanding.

 

Sources:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Fahey, C. (2012). Planning for teaching and learning in geography and history. In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon (Eds.), Place and time. Frenchs Forest: Pearson.

 

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