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9 ways music can improve your life - The Week Magazine

9 ways music can improve your life - The Week Magazine | Live music | Scoop.it
The Week Magazine
9 ways music can improve your life
The Week Magazine
Blood pressure readings revealed that listening to pop or jazz music had the same restorative effect as total silence.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article was about how music makes you a better person or helps you with working if you have ADHD. It talked about how when your playing music when your younger helps you with emotional intelligence. Also when you're working out, listening to your favorite song helps your work out be more effective. Apparently if you listen to Metal or "Angry music" it does not make you commit suicide or crime. In fact if you listen to country music you're more likely to commit suicide.( Makes sense) Stayin Alive by the BeeGees is actually the best song to play while your preforming CPR. 

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Old or New Violin? Musicians Can't Tell - Discovery News

Old or New Violin? Musicians Can't Tell - Discovery News | Live music | Scoop.it
Edmonton Journal
Old or New Violin? Musicians Can't Tell
Discovery News
The musicians were unaware which instruments were old or new, and the new ones were antiqued to give the appearance of age.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This is an interesting project about how violinists prefer new violins rather then old ones. They did a project containing 6 soloists and 12 violins. 6 new and 6 old. after the soloists had chosen which ones they liked. New violins had out weighed  old ones with a ratio of 6 to . 

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Meet the Cyborg Teaching Musicians How to Play Color, Not Sheet Music - Wired

Meet the Cyborg Teaching Musicians How to Play Color, Not Sheet Music - Wired | Live music | Scoop.it
Meet the Cyborg Teaching Musicians How to Play Color, Not Sheet Music
Wired
Neil Harbisson is a colorblind artist who conducted the first concert using colors instead of notes.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This guy is a genius. He has used his color blindness to make music. Since he is color blind he has an electronic eye that sends the colors to him Via bone vibrations in his ear. He also taught a group of musicians to play music this way. Its not like learning a new language, two thirds of your brain are used for processing sight, so it only makes sense for you to be able to learn this new way of hearing. Faster.   

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Imogen Heap's magical music gloves make for handmade beats - CNET

Imogen Heap's magical music gloves make for handmade beats - CNET | Live music | Scoop.it
CNET Imogen Heap's magical music gloves make for handmade beats CNET To solve this, she's "joined forces with the nerd underworld, creating musical gloves using new sensor technology allowing me to compose and perform music with computers in an...
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This is an awesome article about a girl who made these gloves that allow hip hop artists to be more engaged with the audience rather than being stuck behind a big board with knobs and switches. This kind of tech could potentially change the way that we see live music as well as make it.  

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The Price of Music - Re/code

The Price of Music - Re/code | Live music | Scoop.it
The Price of Music
Re/code
Will the recorded music industry ever grow again? Since 1999, the industry has been in rapid decline as CDs became unbundled into downloaded singles.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article explains how music is an elastic product in the economy. Meaning that Lower prices mean better sales and more profit. It talks about how at the height of record company sales (in 1999) they were selling $64 a month to each paying customer and how after that year the sales of physical music has dropped. Its been replaced with digital streaming and in order for them to make a successful buisness in digital streaming they need to sell their streaming for about 3 to 4 dollars a month. in order to make an income of about $48 a year from each paying costumer. 

 

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Beginners' pluck helps our novice get the guitar blues - Wharfedale Observer

Beginners' pluck helps our novice get the guitar blues - Wharfedale Observer | Live music | Scoop.it
Wharfedale Observer Beginners' pluck helps our novice get the guitar blues Wharfedale Observer The courses are neither bogged down in learning music theory, nor about regurgitating one or two songs and going home without having learned something...
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This was an awesome article about how a group of experienced guitarist in Yorkshire have started a group that helps guitarists in the region for all levels. They teach scales and practice throughout the day. I think it is awesome that they are teaching younger people in their community how to play music if they cant afford music classes.

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The Actual Neuroscience Behind Why Some People Don't Like Music - PolicyMic

The Actual Neuroscience Behind Why Some People Don't Like Music - PolicyMic | Live music | Scoop.it
PolicyMic
The Actual Neuroscience Behind Why Some People Don't Like Music
PolicyMic
Researchers at University of Barcelona recently published a new study that reveals certain people are physically unable to enjoy music.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article is about people who are physically incapable of feeling pleasure from music. The phenomenon is caused by some odd wiring in the pleasure centers of the brain.They did a study of people who enjoy music and those who didnt. The study consisted of a game that would reward you with money or music at random. Those who enjoyed music were excited from the money and music. Those who didnt. Just enjoyed the money. 

 

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Rescooped by Nathan Hanson from the psychology of music
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The Psychology of Music: Why Music Plays a Big Role in What You Buy

The Psychology of Music: Why Music Plays a Big Role in What You Buy | Live music | Scoop.it

 

" There are three qualities of music that can influence buying behavior in a retail environment: tempo, volume and genre.  The individual effects we will see in each of these can be explained by Mehrabian and Russell’s model of pleasure-arousal-dominance (PAD). At its most basic level, this model posits that an environment can alter an individual’s mood and therefore behavior by altering levels of pleasure, arousal and/or dominance through different channels."


Via playalongjon
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This was an interesting topic on how different tempo, loudness and style effects customers in businesses the softer and slower it is. The more likely a customer is to buy more than if the music is higher paced or loud.   

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Anthony Rodgers's curator insight, February 15, 2014 2:57 PM

This article is about the effects tempo, volume, and genre has on people while shopping inside a store. I chose to scoop this article because it is related to music and I was interested in how music plays a role in what I decide to purchase. I believe the source of the article is reliable because they gave information about the studies conducted and who conducted the studies. 

Phillip Tijerina's curator insight, February 16, 2014 7:37 PM

This site has minimal credibility as it comes from a blog, even if it is a labs blog.

Lexi Gatling's curator insight, February 16, 2014 10:53 PM

I picked this article because I wanted to know if this was true or not, This articles talks about how three qualities in music influence you to buy merchandise, tempo,volume, and genre.

 

 

Pros:

The Pros of this article showed that playing upbeat music will prompt people to buy more things.

 

 

Cons:

Slow music caused customers to spend a significantly higher dollar amount on alcohol and spent more time eating while fast music led to a faster meal and shorter wait times for incoming patrons.



Playing slow music led to A) significantly more time spent in the store and B) a significant increase (32%) in gross product sales when compared to behavior when fast music was playing.

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Why the music industry is trying—and failing—to crush Pandora - Quartz

Why the music industry is trying—and failing—to crush Pandora - Quartz | Live music | Scoop.it
Why the music industry is trying—and failing—to crush Pandora Quartz This year marks the 15th anniversary of the launch of Napster, the file sharing service that disrupted the music business and conditioned a generation of consumers to expect to be...
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This is another article about how the physical music industry is almost dead or dying and seeking new ways to receive revenue from owning most of the know music. They are doing this by trying to get streaming companies (like Pandora) to pay more money with publishers royalties. Pandora pays out 1.85% of its gross revenue for these royalties. and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers ( ASCAP) is trying increase that amount to 3%. Though recent court cases have had no movement with either side in the amount. 

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Poll: People really hate the music kids are listening to these days - Washington Post (blog)

Poll: People really hate the music kids are listening to these days - Washington Post (blog) | Live music | Scoop.it

acWashington Post (blog) Poll: People really hate the music kids are listening to these days Washington Post (blog) Even though we're only about three years into the 2010s, 42 percent of Americans surveyed think it's already the worst decade for...

Nathan Hanson's insight:

According to this article people are just getting tired of modern music. People like Justin Bieber, Katie Perry, and Miley Cyrus are just becoming annoying back round noise that hurts everytime you hear it. People enjoy the old style of music like the 60 70 80 90s. There needs to be a new genre of music. That of which I am hoping to accomplish. 

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Songza integrates weather into music playlists - USA TODAY

Songza integrates weather into music playlists
USA TODAY
Songza, the app that brings music to you instead of forcing you to hunt for it, today announced a deal with The Weather Company to integrate weather data into the app.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This Scoop is an interesting article about an app that records your location, weather, and life styles to give you music that is built for you. For example, if you go to the gym often. Then it will give you more up beat music when youre at the gym. When youre at work and its an office job. It will give you less upbeat music and more music fitting to the environment. 

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Global Music Revenue Dips 3.9 Pct on Japan Decline - ABC News

Global Music Revenue Dips 3.9 Pct on Japan Decline - ABC News | Live music | Scoop.it
Billboard Global Music Revenue Dips 3.9 Pct on Japan Decline ABC News Global music revenues fell 3.9 percent to $15 billion in 2013, pulled down by a sharp decline in compact disc sales in Japan, according to the International Federation of the...
Nathan Hanson's insight:

Along with other Articles I've posted. This one talks about how the physical sales of music have dropped and are expected to continue to drop. In this article it talks about how just last year Phonograph sales had dropped 12 percent in Japan alone. ( which accounts for a fifth of the worlds earnings in music sales) After reading at least 3 articles about how the music industry is dying and people are now starting to lean toward the live streaming music. I think that I should look into selling our music to that rather than a CD. 

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Why Would Anybody Buy Music Ever Again? - The Atlantic

Why Would Anybody Buy Music Ever Again? - The Atlantic | Live music | Scoop.it
The Atlantic
Why Would Anybody Buy Music Ever Again?
The Atlantic
The same week, Apple announced that iTunes Radio has captured 8 percent of the U.S.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article is about how much the music industry has dropped n 2013. The trends are changing from owning and buying music. To listening to live streams of music and paying for the app that provides the service. The record industry is a dying one. Young people have illegally downloaded and distributed music through Napster and the so called "music black market" to so much extent that their just loosing more and more money.   

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The 40 Highest Earning Musicians in 2013, Carrie Underwood music

Billboard has released its list of 2013′s top 40 earners in music, and the numbers appear to give credence to some oft cited business wisdom: artists don’t make their money on music.
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article told about the amount of money that big hits like, Bruono Mars, Taylor Swift, and Michel Buble and how much money they made in 2013. It helped me know how much they keep out of the millions that they make. 

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Why your brain loves music

Why your brain loves music | Live music | Scoop.it
New neuroscience study sets out to explain why in some respects music offers the same sort of pleasure as a really good thriller.

Via Gust MEES
Nathan Hanson's insight:

This article was one about how music effects the brain. When we listen to a song. Our brain is constantly making predictions on how it should unfold and when it goes in an unexpected direction our brain makes us feel pleasure. Though it only lasts for so long. If the brain keeps being deceived too long it essentially become annoyed and dislike the music.   

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Anna Fabo's curator insight, April 18, 2014 7:00 AM

Podreu descobrir que diuen els últims estudis sobre el perquè el nostre cervell li agrada tant la música.

Natalie Gaskins's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:18 PM

One day, I would love to venture into the field that connects Neuroscience with Music and that is why this article caught my attention right away. I admit to listening to certain songs and having to completely stop whatever I am doing because it was THAT good. I always wondered why that is and why certain sounds that we hear trigger emotions, or stimulation in our brains. I can agree with what the writer said in that we set up expectations in our brains with familiar styles of music and loved to be deceived when the music takes a different direction.I also agree that it is no longer enjoyable when the music goes too astray from what my brain wanted. It just gets annoying that way! It keeps excitement in the song and makes you try to anticipate what is going to happen next. It is a way to keep the listener attentive. I know that when I song is too predictable, it quickly looses my attention. As a songwriter, I feel that this is very crucial when writing. We have to keep the audience engaged at all times. This is also why artists make certain line-up choices while performing at a gig. I thought it odd that we get a different level of satisfaction when we have paid for the music and are then anticipating the surprise. Very odd. 

I would love to venture deeper into these studies and unlock more neurological secrets. Knowledge like this can help sell music.

Sirenita Guzmán's curator insight, July 7, 2015 4:50 PM

añada su visión ...