Little Bee
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Onset of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depression Among Refugees ...: EBSCOhost

Onset of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depression Among Refugees ...: EBSCOhost | Little Bee | Scoop.it
Grace Catherine Geist's insight:

In this article it talks about how refugees all come in with a story. Most of them have post traumatic stress disorder or depression from their experiences. Little Bee was already depressed before she got to England because she saw her entire family die and many others in her village. The detention center didn't help her much "'The psychiatrist at the detention center was right, she could not do anything for me. I am still crazy'"(149). Their depression comes with them and then stays with them. 

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Jeremy Collier's comment, February 6, 2014 1:11 PM
Grace is right in saying the depression more than likely is already with the refugees when they reach the detention center. The refugees may have seen something so traumatic (which caused them to get out) that it continues to haunt them and causes post traumatic stress disorder. In Little Bee's case, the post traumatic stress occurs when she thinks about the men coming to kill her and she thinks of ways to kill herself as a way of coping with the possibility of her life being in danger again. "'Maybe I will only be able to stay for one month, maybe one week. Someday the men will come. But while I am here I will be like your daughter'"(Cleave 148). Because Little Bee still believes there is a possibility the men will come, even in a safe country, it shows that post traumatic stress is a constant, but she will only leave when she "has" to.
Luke Henes's comment, February 10, 2014 9:48 PM
This article helps explain why Little Bee had the bad post traumatic stress disorder she did. The article states that "refugees may suffer higher rates of a number of mental health problems", compared to voluntary migrants. Little Bee flees her country because of the terror that was going on in her country. The article also shows that the rate of post traumatic stress disorder among people who have experienced war zones or been exposed to ongoing terror, is one of the highest. This explains why Little Bee had such a bad case of this and feared the men so much. "When I thought about men, I felt a fear in my belly so sharp it was like knives piercing me" (Cleave 54). Little Bee was haunted by the thoughts of these men because she experienced the terro first hand. <br>
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Emotion regulation through listening to music in every day situations.

Jeremy Collier's insight:

Music is a stimulus capable of triggering an array of basic and complex emotions. This article investigates whether individuals employ music to induce specific emotional states in everyday situations for the purpose of emotion regulation. In this article, they wanted to examine whether specific emotion-regulation styles influence music selection in specific situations. This relates to the connection of U2's song "One" and Little Bee's feelings towards the people in her country "No one likes each other, but everyone likes U2" (Cleave 134). Also, how it brings back memories of her sister and the last moments the two spent together.

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Caroline Bourquin's comment, February 4, 2014 8:18 PM
Music has an effect on ones emotions. Music can bring these emotions up. The song "One" does this for Little Bee. 'I did not cry when they killed my sister but I did cry when I heard the music coming out of the soldiers' truck because I was thinking, That is my sister's favorite song and she will never hear it again'(Cleave 134). When Little Bee thinks of this song it makes her think of her sister being happy and the good times in her life. 'Everyone in my village liked U2'(Cleave 134). Music brings people together for good reasons. Little Bee will always think of her sister and her village when she hears that song and have emotions towards the song. It will make Little Bee think of happier times in her life with her sister and bringing her village together.
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Via Luke Henes
Troy Hilderhof's insight:

Love is a powerful emotion. It was clear early on that Sarah never felt a serious deep connection with Andrew. "It was gorgeous, I gave myself completely to Lawrence in a way I never had with Andrew. It happened easily, without any effort on my part. I cried when we made love. It just happened; it wasn't an act" (161).  This affair Sarah felt with Lawrence was natural and provided Sarah to escape from Andrew. "But to really escape from Andrew, to really become myself, I had to go the whole way and fall in love. And again, I didn't have to make an effort to fall in love with Lawrence. All I had to do was to permit myself to topple. This is quite safe" (162). When Sarah is with Lawrence, it gives her a feeling of emotional security.

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Luke Henes's curator insight, January 28, 2014 9:05 PM

This article is about the emotional cheating which leads to sexual cheating. It describes the effect that they may not realize they are putting on their spouse. This relates to Sarah and Andrew because Sarah's cheating was what led to them going on the trip to Nigeria. They went because their relationship was broken and they wanted to fix it. This could have been a little factor in Andrew's death. Even though Andrew killed himself because of what happened in Nigeria, it might not have ended like that if he had a strong relationship with Sarah. SInce their relationship was broken he might have felt like there was no way out except suicide.

Allie Dierks's comment, January 30, 2014 2:22 PM
Emotional cheating is an issue that many people deal with in their lives. It says "the definition of emotional cheating is when a spouse or partner forms a deep emotional bond with someone outside the primary relationship, putting a third part, a "friend," as their priority over their primary relationship, literally cutting a spouse or partner out of their own relationship in favor of their friend" (Burney 8). Sarah has dealt with emotional cheating, and still is. We are revealed, as the book goes on, of the secrets Sarah has been keeping from Andrew. Sarah is a prime victim of emotional cheating purely because she has secretly invested her life in another man while being married to someone else. Readers can tend to be somewhat overwhelmed at the beginning of the book when hearing about Andrew's tragic death without knowing yet what caused it. As the book goes on we find more and more out about this certain situation dealing with Andrew, Sarah, and Little Bee and also begin to learn more and more about the characters, and who they truly are. Sarah says "I switched off the phone, very gently. It was simpler than announcing to Andrew the change in our way of life. It was easier than explaining to him: our marriage has just been morally wounded, quite by accident, but a gang of bullies picking on the blind man" (Cleave 161). Knowing the insight of Sarah now helps us begin to understand all the bumps in these relationships in the book. Not only is Sarah a fragile person, but when reading more and more we discover that each character is fragile and it takes one little thing- one comment, one hidden truth, or one lie to get to the point where they are completely broken.
Caroline Bourquin's comment, January 30, 2014 7:16 PM
The definition from the article describes Sarah relationship with Lawrence exactly. The article says the definition of emotional cheating is when a spouse or partner forms a deep emotional bond with someone outside the primary relationship and making that third party as their priority over the primary partner or spouse. Sarah does this exactly to Andrew with her relationship with Lawrence and she knows it. 'I didn't lose Andrew, Bee. I destroyed him. I cheated on him with another man'(139). Sarah knows her relationship with Lawrence caused her to neglect Andrew when he needed her support. "I gave myself completely to Lawrence in a way that I never had with Andrew"(161). Lawrence gave Sarah what she didn't have with Andrew. Sarah needed Lawrence because Andrew was gone. Sarah should have helped him but all she cared about really was her relationship with Lawrence.
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Luke Henes's insight:

This articles talks about high percentage of refugee women that post-traumatic stress disorder affects. It also states many reasons as to why this affects so many of these people. Some of the reasons include lack of social support and serious life events that have happened. This is relevant to Little Bee in both of those ways. As readers, we know that Little Bee had to witness her town being taken over by "the men". The men knew what Little Bee and her sister had seen, so they came after the girls and ended up killing Little Bee's sister. These events are things that are scared into Little Bee's memory and she will always think about what happened. This is she always has anxiety and is thinking about how she will kill herself if the men come. She also lacks social support because she really has no one to go to except Sarah, and in reality she is helping Sarah, not being helped by Sarah. She cannot go to a mental hospital like normal refugees with this disorder to get treatment because she is not suppose to be out of the detention center.

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Jack William Casey's comment, January 30, 2014 11:34 AM
Little Bee relates to this article because Bee does not have a support system. Without a support system, she had no one to look for when she gets to England and that is why she seeks out Andrew and Sarah. When she comes to England she feels like an outsider. She tries to fit in, but this just makes everything worse. She starts to lose her Nigerian background, but she is not able to completely become English. She starts to feel lonely is qurestioning herself by asking if "Is it [her] fault if [she] do[es] not look like an English girl and [she] do[es] not talk like a Nigerian?" (35). This feeling of loneliness escalates her PTSD. She has no one to talk to about what happened back in Nigeria. She just bottles it up and makes herself feel worse.
Allie Dierks's comment, February 2, 2014 9:15 PM
This article written by Catherine Collins discusses how postnatal depression (PND) is a common health problem among refugees especially. This article talks about how "if left untreated, PND can develop into severe clinical depression and, in a small number of cases, lead to suicide, which is one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in the UK" (Collins 4). This relates to the book Little Bee mostly in the fact that this symptom is common among refugees in the UK. There's no doubt that Little Bee could've been suffering from PSD while in the immigration center because of the fact that she meets most of the symptoms of this syndrome. While reading this article readers can realize that immigration centers are home to many unhealthy and ill problems among people who are held there. With Little Bee going through such rough times in the immigration center, she definitely wasn't the only one there going through troubles. Little Bee tells us "I was naive to suppose I had left my country with nothing. It was a heavy cargo that I carried" (Cleave 46). This quote makes us realize that Little Bee's past is among her at all times; the immigration center isn't going to just get rid of it. This quote also helps us realize that most people in immigration centers are "carrying a cargo" just like Little Bee is. Harsh and sad memories such as being sexually abused, or any memory dealing with death and violence, doesn't just disappear from your mind. This article and the book together help us realize that a majority of people in immigration centers, but not all of them, have had dark pasts that sometimes can seem inescapable to them.
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The mental and physical health difficulties of children held within a Briti...: EBSCOhost


Via Troy Hilderhof
Weston Jacobs's insight:

I think these children that took the survey are very similar to Little Bee and her friends becuase they both suffer from the same things. They both suffer from anxiety. just like the girls from Little Bee, they are so freaked out that the men will come, Little Bee is so scared that where ever she goes she has to figure out ways to kill her self to be safe. In this survey and in the book Little Bee both the girls and the children suffrered many health problems.They lacked nutrients in there body, they weren't healthy at all. After reading this article and from what Ive read so far in this book, children that are kept in immigration detention centers suffer mentally and physical problems that will and can lead to them to kill themselves.

 

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Troy Hilderhof's curator insight, January 17, 2014 12:32 PM

In this article, 24 different children were surveryed and examined to see the mental and physcial effects of being held in a detention center. Their ages ranged from 3 months to 17 years. A random 11 were selected and all proved to have symptoms of depression and anxiety. These children draw similiar characersitcs of Little Bee. In the book, it is Little Bee is in this age group and has symptoms of anxiety because she always stressed to herself how important it is for her to learn the "Queen's English." She always reminded herself how critical it was that she doesn't sound like a savage when she talks in public because she fears that if she messes up at all, she could be deported back home.

Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 21, 2014 8:43 PM
This article totally relates to Little Bee because it says that children in her age range that were held in British detention centers suffer from depression and anxiety. Little Bee has anxiety, she is always afraid for when the men come. She says that detention center told them they "must be disciplined to overcome our fears"(47). The only thing Little Bee learned from that was "whenever I got into a new place, I work out how to kill myself"(47). The detention center excepts them to go out and live in the British society perfectly when they are only making the kids worse than when they came. Little Bee knows how to survive and speak good english, but not function in a society. When Little Bee is talking to the taxi driver she calls him a "cock"(57) because she doesn't know any better, she doesn't understand that it's offensive to call someone that. Lucky for Little Bee she was smart enough to teach herself good English and find her way to Sarah's house.
Allie Dierks's comment, January 24, 2014 2:56 PM
There was a study that was aimed to show the attitude and mental health of children that were held in a British detention center. There was a psychological assessment of eleven children and eight met the criteria for symptoms and concerns. The overall conclusion these testers came up with was that almost all of these detained children were experiencing mental and physical health issues. These issues were said to be related to their detention experience. Little Bee has had nothing but a difficult experience during the two years she was held in the detention center. We are reminded constantly about her fear of men in general because of her past experiences, and being with men in the detention center horrifies her. For the whole two year she was there "[she] did not smile or even look in any man's face. [She] was terrified). (Cleave 7) I've constantly been swaying back and forth during this book between feeling confident that Little Bee will grow from her horrifying experience in the detention center but also between worrying that this experience will slowly crush her to the point where all her hope is gone. It is relieving once Little Bee leaves the detention center, but we are left wondering if her experiences will stick with her. This article talks about how "the traumatic experience of detention itself also has implications for the proportion of psychologically distressed children who are eventually released from detention and expected to successfully reintegrate into British society" (Lorek). Although it will be hard for Little Bee to be integrated back into a normal society with Sarah and Charlie, we are shown glimpses of hope that Little Bee can fully gain back the confidence she had as a child. The fact that Little Bee has learned the British language while in the detention center shows that she is able to motivate herself, and has motivated herself. As the story goes on I feel that this reoccurring question of whether she will keep finding motivation to live in life stays in the back of our minds as we keep reading.
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Caroline Bourquin's insight:

This article about refuegee camps like Where Little Bee was for two years. "The morning they let us out of the detention center, they gave us all our possessions"(8). Little Bee said theis. She wasn't even suppose to be let out. When she was let out she wasn't even given papers. She neeeds those papers or she will be sent back if she is caught without them. The article says that people in refuegee camps faced injustice. It seems like they can easily be taken taken advatage of by the people since the refuegee don't really know what is going on. "He looked down at the ground, and then up again. 'Best of luck," he said(19). The detention officer said thei to Little Bee and the other girls because he knows it is not easy for refuegees to start a new life. 

 

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Jack William Casey's comment, January 30, 2014 11:43 AM
"'Dere's freedom as in, yu girls is free to go, and den dere's freedom as in, yu girls is free to go till we catches you. Sorry, but it's that second kind of freedom we got right now, Lil Bee. Truth. Dey call it being a illegal immigrant'" (3.31). Yevette was telling Little Bee about this once they left the detention center. Both of them are illegal refugees and they are scared of being sent back. Little Bee realizes that she still has no refuge. She is still making sure that she is not caught and that she is not sent back to Nigeria. Little bee is living her life in constant fear like all other refugees. She is suffering from the horrors of her past and these horrors influence her actions throughout her whole life.
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The mental and physical health difficulties of children held within a Briti...: EBSCOhost

Troy Hilderhof's insight:

In this article, 24 different children were surveryed and examined to see the mental and physcial effects of being held in a detention center. Their ages ranged from 3 months to 17 years. A random 11 were selected and all proved to have symptoms of depression and anxiety. These children draw similiar characersitcs of Little Bee. In the book, it is Little Bee is in this age group and has symptoms of anxiety because she always stressed to herself how important it is for her to learn the "Queen's English." She always reminded herself how critical it was that she doesn't sound like a savage when she talks in public because she fears that if she messes up at all, she could be deported back home.

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Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 21, 2014 8:43 PM
This article totally relates to Little Bee because it says that children in her age range that were held in British detention centers suffer from depression and anxiety. Little Bee has anxiety, she is always afraid for when the men come. She says that detention center told them they "must be disciplined to overcome our fears"(47). The only thing Little Bee learned from that was "whenever I got into a new place, I work out how to kill myself"(47). The detention center excepts them to go out and live in the British society perfectly when they are only making the kids worse than when they came. Little Bee knows how to survive and speak good english, but not function in a society. When Little Bee is talking to the taxi driver she calls him a "cock"(57) because she doesn't know any better, she doesn't understand that it's offensive to call someone that. Lucky for Little Bee she was smart enough to teach herself good English and find her way to Sarah's house.
Allie Dierks's comment, January 24, 2014 2:56 PM
There was a study that was aimed to show the attitude and mental health of children that were held in a British detention center. There was a psychological assessment of eleven children and eight met the criteria for symptoms and concerns. The overall conclusion these testers came up with was that almost all of these detained children were experiencing mental and physical health issues. These issues were said to be related to their detention experience. Little Bee has had nothing but a difficult experience during the two years she was held in the detention center. We are reminded constantly about her fear of men in general because of her past experiences, and being with men in the detention center horrifies her. For the whole two year she was there "[she] did not smile or even look in any man's face. [She] was terrified). (Cleave 7) I've constantly been swaying back and forth during this book between feeling confident that Little Bee will grow from her horrifying experience in the detention center but also between worrying that this experience will slowly crush her to the point where all her hope is gone. It is relieving once Little Bee leaves the detention center, but we are left wondering if her experiences will stick with her. This article talks about how "the traumatic experience of detention itself also has implications for the proportion of psychologically distressed children who are eventually released from detention and expected to successfully reintegrate into British society" (Lorek). Although it will be hard for Little Bee to be integrated back into a normal society with Sarah and Charlie, we are shown glimpses of hope that Little Bee can fully gain back the confidence she had as a child. The fact that Little Bee has learned the British language while in the detention center shows that she is able to motivate herself, and has motivated herself. As the story goes on I feel that this reoccurring question of whether she will keep finding motivation to live in life stays in the back of our minds as we keep reading.
Weston Jacobs's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:57 PM

I think these children that took the survey are very similar to Little Bee and her friends becuase they both suffer from the same things. They both suffer from anxiety. just like the girls from Little Bee, they are so freaked out that the men will come, Little Bee is so scared that where ever she goes she has to figure out ways to kill her self to be safe. In this survey and in the book Little Bee both the girls and the children suffrered many health problems.They lacked nutrients in there body, they weren't healthy at all. After reading this article and from what Ive read so far in this book, children that are kept in immigration detention centers suffer mentally and physical problems that will and can lead to them to kill themselves.

 

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Jack William Casey's insight:

This article is about post traumatic stress disorder in refugees. Little Bee, Sarah, and Andrew all suffer from this even though Little Bee is the only refugee. The events that happened in Little Bee's village have had long term effects on the charatcers such as suicide, paranoia, and lack of emotion. PTSD, if gone untreated, can be deadly just like with Andrew. Little Bee says in the book that she can't escape her memories. She can't escape the horror that she has experienced. Not being able to escape the past is a sign of PTSD.

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Jeremy Collier's comment, January 21, 2014 11:43 AM
PTSD is a form of anxiety disorder, which may be brought up after one has gone through a traumatic event where they were in a threatening setting and witnessed injury or death. This often happens when a loved one is injured in some way. We do not know what happened to Sarah, Andrew, or Little Bee at this point but it is clear that Andrew is suffering from PTSD based on his depression. Little Bee had witnessed a lot of traumatic events because of her location in Nigeria and the problems her country's government are plagued with. Once Little Bee reaches the UK, it is clear she has PTSD because she claims she "had finished working out how to kill myself in every single corner of the detention center and the country outside" (48). Sarah, on the other hand, has a physical disability that often reminds her of the horrors she and Andrew faced in Nigeria. We assume that the act of her losing her finger is a violent one because she does not like thinking about it because it brings back bad memories, which may have given her a form of PTSD.
Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 10:10 PM
At this point in the book, we know that Little Bee was there and witnessed Andrew Killing himself. Andrew thought Little Bee was just an image his brain was producing, and he didn't believe it was actually her. He was saying "Oh Jesus, you are not real, you are not there, just get out of my f***ing head" (Cleave 191). Andrew was so stuck in what had happened in the past, that even when Little Bee was there to help him he couldn't change his mind about the past and killed himself. Andrew also tells Little Bee that he was not happy with the person he was on the beach. Little Bee tries to tell Andrew that her sister is alive, but Andrew knows the truth. He knows that because he didn't cut his finger off, she is dead. The article talks about how this disorder going untreated can be deadly. In addition to Andrew, we also see this with the girl with no name. She was going through this but had no treatment because she couldn't or she would be caught. This girl had a serious case and needed professional help. This lack of help ultimately led to her death.
Caroline Bourquin's comment, January 30, 2014 7:02 PM
The article talked about a study done for PTSD that indicated that refugees and asylum seekers can be treated successfully for PTSD and depression in the general health care system. Little Bee was traumatized when she was in the refugee camp. "For the first six months in the detention center, I screamed every night and in the day I imagined a thousand ways to kill myself"(47).Little Bee was scared the men would come and think of ways to kill herself and other people actually did. Little Bee has seen a lot of bad things in her short life. "I was weak from horror and they put me in the medical wing"(48). Little Bee was not happy at all in the detention center. Little Bee was continually thinking of the men back home. They never leave her mind. They followed her to the detention center. Little Bee needs help. All refugees that need help should get it.
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Psychological trauma in patients with psychog... [Epilepsy Behav. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

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Weston Jacobs's insight:

I think this article is relevant to Little Bee because from what I have read so far, we know that one of the four girls that was released with them has now killed themself because she thinks the "men" will come and get her. She is psychologically so screwed up because she thinks that the men will get her but she isn't even in the same country as the men that would come and kill her. 

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Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 9:21 PM
From this article it sounds like the girl that killed herself had this non-epileptic seizure. This led to the physiological trauma that led her to committing suicide. She was in a state of mind that was screwed up, and she thought the men were coming for her. People do not function normal when they are having a seizure, and this girl was not acting normal during her experience. She could not get the thought of the men killing her out of her head. The article states that numbers are higher in women with PNES's than those that have experienced sexual abuse. Little Bee and the other girls have witnessed abuse, experienced it, and had to live in fear of it happening again.
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Violence against Women - Gender Issues - UNIFEM

Violence against Women - Gender Issues - UNIFEM | Little Bee | Scoop.it
UNIFEM, the United Nations Development Fund for Women, is the women's fund at the United Nations. It provides financial and technical assistance to innovative programmes and strategies to foster women's empowerment and gender equality.
Allie Dierks's insight:

This article describes well how there is much violence against women at this point in time. Little Bee herself in this book tells us how she has experienced violence towards herself before she left Nigeria. At this point in the book there hasn't been very much detail of what harm Little Bee went through, but she does bring up multiple times that she is terrified if "the men" come. Little Bee says that she thinks of scenarios where she could kill herself different ways if "the men" are in the act of coming towards her, so she'd be dead before they approached her. We are left wondering who "the men" are and how they affect her life. This article shares, "It takes place in the home, on the streets, in schools, the workplace, in farm fields, refugee camps, during conflicts and crises"(1). Little Bee is experiencing pain inside of an immigration detention center. She is in an immigration detention center because she attempted to flee from Nigeria but did not succeed. Her past if full of men who bring horror to her, as she tells us. "I did not smile or even look in any man's face .I was terrified" (Cleave 7). Little Bee is not the only one who has experienced harm from men. The girls she talks with at the immigration center, Little Bee says, start off all their stories the same, and that "the men" have to do with all their stories. This book helps us realize that violence is everywhere in this world, and bad things are happening all around us. For example  "up to six out of every ten women experience physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime" (1). This article helps us connect with the book Little Bee in the fact that women are very-well vicimized, in and outside of the book. 

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Caroline Bourquin's comment, January 16, 2014 11:26 AM
Women from other countries especially like Nigeria have lives that are very different from women's lives in America and Britain. Women in these other countries don't have many rights at all. The men have all the power. The United Nations Development Fund for Women helps them start their own lives so they don't have to rely on a man. It helps these women become independent. Little Bee is very sacred of men. We don't know exactly why yet but it must be very bad because everywhere she goes she thinks of a way to kill herself in case they come. "For me and the girls from my village, horror is a disease and we are sick with it (45). Little Bee is saying that in countries like Britain horror means something different than it does to the girls back home. Little Bee is saying they are sick with horror every day. We don't know what exactly this horror is yet. "If the men come suddenly, I will be ready to kill myself (47). This thought occupies Little Bee's mind all the time.
Jeremy Collier's comment, January 28, 2014 8:55 PM
When Sarah and Andrew were on the beach in Nigeria, the two of them witnessed first hand the violence and dominance of men towards the women of their country. When the two ran into Little Bee and her sister, Kindness, they were attacked by the men who had recently invaded the sisters' village. Sarah and Andrew attempted to bargain with the killers to spare the girls' lives but only came to the conclusion that one would survive. "Then he pointed my finger at Kindness. 'But you will die, little one" (Cleave 116). Later, Little Bee recalls what the killers did to Kindness before brutally killing her. This type of violence is what this article is referring to, in this case, unnecessary violence towards women, which is what happened to Kindness.
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Women: the invisible detainees.

Allie Dierks's insight:

This article talks about how women and men are treated differently at these immigration centers, and there are many problems that can come along with being a woman at one of these places. 

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Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 9:40 PM
Large proportions of<br>women in detention have also previously<br>been victims of domestic violence, sexual<br>assault, trafficking and other forms of gender-<br>based harm" (38). This relates to Little Bee and the other girls because they were fleeing from domestic violence in Nigeria. The article also talks about the more restrictions women have in detention centers. These include restrictions in libraries and other resourceful places. This affects the way women are able to adapt to the country they are fleeing to. Little Bee describes in the beginning of the book how hard it was for her to adapt to the "Queen's English". It might have been easier if she was allowed some of the same access to books that the men were. Little Bee also says that you have to look good or talk good to live. This just says to me that if you do not meet one of those requirements, you are treated really bad, sexually abused, and or killed. Basically if you are not a top woman you are not going to be treated equal to men.
Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 9:41 PM
"Large proportions of<br>women in detention have also previously<br>been victims of domestic violence, sexual<br>assault, trafficking and other forms of gender-<br>based harm"(38). - that was the quote. It got messed up in my post
Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 9:42 PM
Ok it did it again! SORRY!
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Rates of Mental Illness and Suicidality in Immigrant, Refugee, Ethnocultura...: EBSCOhost

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"'Then there was the detention center. It was very bad. It is not possible to think clearly in there. You have not committed a crime, so all you can think of is, when will I be let out? But they tell you nothing. After a month, six months, you start to think, maybe I will grow old in here. Maybe I will die in here. Maybe I am already dead. For the first year all I could think about was killing myself'"(Cleave146). Little Bee is suffering from mental illness and is very suicidal. This article talks about refugees and their perception to mental illness and suicide. It relates to the book "Little Bee" because she is very suicidal and thinks of how to kill herself in any given situation. 

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Jack William Casey's comment, February 11, 2014 4:09 PM
Refugees have to through Hell and then Hell again when they go to the detention center. When they have to stay there for so long, they can still be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. When Little Bee was in the detention center, she "work[ed] out how [she] would kill [herself]"(Cleave 9). She was never really able to get over her past experiences until she got out of the detention center. To get over her fears, she had to go out and face her fears instead of being forced to hide from them in the detention center.
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"Is Adultery Ever Justified?"

Jeremy Collier's insight:

Many people offer theories explaining why adultery happens and what factors make it more likely. Some argue that monogamy is unnatural, therefore cheating should not be surprising. But theories can't tell us whether adultery is right or wrong, because such judgments do not depend on explanations. Scholars can explain why it can be hard to stay monogamous, but we wouldn't even try unless we had a reason to, and most of the time, that reason is moral. This article gives you the chance to understand Sarah and Lawrence's motives behind their actions even when the book doesn't come out and say the reasonings.

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Caroline Bourquin's comment, February 4, 2014 8:19 PM
This article says that people who do commit adultery have justification for doing so. Some people don't believe in it ever. Sarah used justification in her reason for cheating on Andrew. "I gave myself completely to Lawrence in a way that I never had with Andrew"(Cleave 161). Sarah knows that she justified her relationship with Lawrence. She told herself that it was okay. "That's what our affair was meant to be"(Cleave 161). Sarah told herself that it wouldn't become what it did with Lawrence. Sarah failed but that didn't stop her.
Luke Henes's comment, February 10, 2014 9:19 PM
The article states some cases in which cheating is okay, which includes horrible relationships. In Little Bee, although Sarah gives some valid reasons including "I just felt so unfulfilled, so downtrodden", it does not make cheating right (Cleave 163). Sarah also states that she never felt loved or supported, which is a very bad problem in a relationship. However, that is not an excuse to go cheat on your husband. Sarah should evaluate her marriage, and if she feels it is not right for her, then she should get a divorce. Sarah's actions are wrong. Her situation is not a valid "horrible relationship" in which cheating should be accepted. Sarah broke the "commitment for life", as Andrew said, and chose cheating as her way out of the relationship (Cleave 163).
Jack William Casey's comment, February 11, 2014 4:15 PM
Sarah feels ashamed for cheating on Andrew, because she feels that this lead to his death. She feels that she betrayed Andrew which led them to the beach. Lawrence, on the other hand, is "'not ashamed of [his] adultery, [he's] ashamed of [his] fucking cover story'"(Cleave 231). This shows the differing of opinions between the two characters. Sarah regrets the relationship between the two of them, while Lawrence does not.
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Luke Henes's insight:

This article is about the emotional cheating which leads to sexual cheating. It describes the effect that they may not realize they are putting on their spouse. This relates to Sarah and Andrew because Sarah's cheating was what led to them going on the trip to Nigeria. They went because their relationship was broken and they wanted to fix it. This could have been a little factor in Andrew's death. Even though Andrew killed himself because of what happened in Nigeria, it might not have ended like that if he had a strong relationship with Sarah. SInce their relationship was broken he might have felt like there was no way out except suicide.

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Troy Hilderhof's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:11 PM

Love is a powerful emotion. It was clear early on that Sarah never felt a serious deep connection with Andrew. "It was gorgeous, I gave myself completely to Lawrence in a way I never had with Andrew. It happened easily, without any effort on my part. I cried when we made love. It just happened; it wasn't an act" (161).  This affair Sarah felt with Lawrence was natural and provided Sarah to escape from Andrew. "But to really escape from Andrew, to really become myself, I had to go the whole way and fall in love. And again, I didn't have to make an effort to fall in love with Lawrence. All I had to do was to permit myself to topple. This is quite safe" (162). When Sarah is with Lawrence, it gives her a feeling of emotional security.

Allie Dierks's comment, January 30, 2014 2:22 PM
Emotional cheating is an issue that many people deal with in their lives. It says "the definition of emotional cheating is when a spouse or partner forms a deep emotional bond with someone outside the primary relationship, putting a third part, a "friend," as their priority over their primary relationship, literally cutting a spouse or partner out of their own relationship in favor of their friend" (Burney 8). Sarah has dealt with emotional cheating, and still is. We are revealed, as the book goes on, of the secrets Sarah has been keeping from Andrew. Sarah is a prime victim of emotional cheating purely because she has secretly invested her life in another man while being married to someone else. Readers can tend to be somewhat overwhelmed at the beginning of the book when hearing about Andrew's tragic death without knowing yet what caused it. As the book goes on we find more and more out about this certain situation dealing with Andrew, Sarah, and Little Bee and also begin to learn more and more about the characters, and who they truly are. Sarah says "I switched off the phone, very gently. It was simpler than announcing to Andrew the change in our way of life. It was easier than explaining to him: our marriage has just been morally wounded, quite by accident, but a gang of bullies picking on the blind man" (Cleave 161). Knowing the insight of Sarah now helps us begin to understand all the bumps in these relationships in the book. Not only is Sarah a fragile person, but when reading more and more we discover that each character is fragile and it takes one little thing- one comment, one hidden truth, or one lie to get to the point where they are completely broken.
Caroline Bourquin's comment, January 30, 2014 7:16 PM
The definition from the article describes Sarah relationship with Lawrence exactly. The article says the definition of emotional cheating is when a spouse or partner forms a deep emotional bond with someone outside the primary relationship and making that third party as their priority over the primary partner or spouse. Sarah does this exactly to Andrew with her relationship with Lawrence and she knows it. 'I didn't lose Andrew, Bee. I destroyed him. I cheated on him with another man'(139). Sarah knows her relationship with Lawrence caused her to neglect Andrew when he needed her support. "I gave myself completely to Lawrence in a way that I never had with Andrew"(161). Lawrence gave Sarah what she didn't have with Andrew. Sarah needed Lawrence because Andrew was gone. Sarah should have helped him but all she cared about really was her relationship with Lawrence.
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Has multiculturalism failed in Britain?: EBSCOhost

Has multiculturalism failed in Britain?: EBSCOhost | Little Bee | Scoop.it

Via Troy Hilderhof
Weston Jacobs's insight:

From what I've read so far, I think that Sarah is very welcoming of Little Bee. She is from a completely different country with a different background and has gone through unimaginable struggles and life changing experiences. Sarah knows that and she excepts completely, even though she has changed her life completely. So I think multiculturalism is not dead in Britian just from what Sarah is doing for Little Bee, taking her in and making her apart of her new family. But I don't think Little Bee needs Sarah, Sarah needs Little Bee more then anything at this point in her life.

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Jack William Casey's comment, January 21, 2014 10:00 PM
In Little Bee we see how Little Bee is caught between cultures. She even asks herself if "it [is] [her] fault if [she] [does] not look like an English girl and [she does] not talk like a Nigerian?" (36). She is caught between the two worlds that she is living in. She does not want to forget her home, but she wants to fit in in England. This is why multiculturalism does not work. People don't want to forget their past, but they are trying to fit in with the non- conforming English culture. Little Bee is just trying to fit in, but she may never be able to.
Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 27, 2014 10:37 PM
I see both sides in Little Bee. They are treated poorly in the detention center and only get let out because Yevette "did a favor for one of dem immigration man(68). Lawerence wants Sarah to call the police and get her out of the house "you know nothing about the woman. What if she comes into your room in the night with a kitchen knife? What if she's crazy?"(122). He thinks just because she is a refugee that she is danergous. He is being mean just because she is from another country. He is worried about being caught in Sarah's house with Little Bee in it and thinks he will lose his job if anyone finds out. Sarah on the other hand has sympathy for Little Bee, even though she knows she is illilegal and could get in trouble for housing her. Sarah takes Little Bee under her wing letting her stay for as long as she wants. So from this book I dont think multiculturlism is completely gone in Britian, but it could be leading into that.
Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 10:23 PM
I also see both sides in Little Bee. When the girls get out of the immigration center, Mr. Ayers takes in the girls even with the risk that goes along with that. He knew the girls were going to get caught if they continued to walk around the city, so out of the kindness of his heart he took them in. Sarah also accepts Little Bee because she knows Little Bee has nowhere to go, and cannot ignore her for what happened in the past. We also see an acceptance of an immigrant through batman. He opens up to Little Bee and realizes she is a "goody". He also looks up to her as a big sister. Although some people are welcoming, others are not. There are those people like Lawrence and the people that work at the daycare place that question Sarah accompanying Little Bee.
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Caroline Bourquin's insight:

"Little Bee had fled southeast on bleeding feet from what had once been her village and was shortly to becoming an oil field"(99). If it wasn't for the oil that men wanted under her village Little Bee would have probably never meet Sarah and Andrew. Little be was running away from the village as the men were coming and killing everyone one. They wanted to kill everyone so no one could tell on them. In the article it talks about how the oil in Nigeria in very important to the economy there. It also says they need help developing there technologies there. Nigeria is underdelveloped. This allowded them to just go to what ever village and destroy it just to get the oil. "The foreign Office were advising against travel to parts of Nigeria, but we didn't think that included ours"(99). Sarah and Andrew had no idea what was going on with the oil in Nigeria and the problems it was causing. Oil means a lot down there because of the money poeple want and the power. They will do anything down there to get it. 

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Allie Dierks's comment, January 24, 2014 3:13 PM
Nigeria has had issues with oil in the past, as we find out from this book. The fact that Little Bee and her sister fled from Nigeria because of her whole community being burned and torn down, mainly dealing with the oil crisis, shows how much of an impact this oil crisis played on her and her community. The Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development Act of 2010 was made to fully restrict any harm done to Nigeria. Their provisions such as "the main purpose of these provisions concerning manpower training is to ensure that Nigeria control and operate all phases of its oil industry" shows that these strict provisions are set to do nothing but eliminate damage of anything. (Atsegbua). It is crazy to think that men from Nigeria would be crude enough to actually burn down communities and people to aid from free oil in order to help themselves. Although Little Bee and her sister experienced these horrifying times, the one good thing that came from this is that Little Bee has survived and has grown stronger. If they didn't experience this at all they would've never been able to meet Andrew and Sarah. And if they never met them imagine where Little Bee would be, and if she would even be alive. Little Bee shares with us "take is from me, a scar does not form on the dying. A scar means, I survived" (Cleave 9).Although she went through so much difficulty in life, there is nothing more inspirational and motivating to us that Little Bee has survived in all aspects of her life.
Jeremy Collier's comment, February 6, 2014 1:26 PM
Across the whole continent of Africa, there is a great amount of countries that are rich in oil. However, the oil causes more internal conflicts than external and because of that, the conflicts are rarely fixed using external help. Nigeria, in this case is one that receives little-to-no external help, which explains the oil wars that are happening within the country. Other countries are taking advantage of the Nigerian oil and claiming it theirs, while the Nigerian oil companies believe the oil is rightfully theirs. This causes internal wars between who's oil is who's often resulting in villages (like Little Bee's) and people to be slaughtered in retaliation for the lack of agreement between the two sides.
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Has multiculturalism failed in Britain?: EBSCOhost

Has multiculturalism failed in Britain?: EBSCOhost | Little Bee | Scoop.it
Troy Hilderhof's insight:

The article asks whether multiculuarlism has failed in Britain. Turns out, even thought there isn't any official descrimating policies directed towards immigrants or people of foreign descent, the country still isn't as welcoming as they should. The book opens out with Little Bee saying she would rather be a British pound coin than an African girl. Little Bee doesn't feel she fits in with the crowd. Little Bee wishes she was the point coin because "it can leap the turnstiles" (2) while a girl like her gets stopped at immigration. Little Bee quotes many times througout the opening part of the book that she must speak the language properly in order to survive. If you have to have the idea to speak weel just to survive in a country, that's proof right there the country isn't welcoming to foreigners. 

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Weston Jacobs's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:12 PM

From what I've read so far, I think that Sarah is very welcoming of Little Bee. She is from a completely different country with a different background and has gone through unimaginable struggles and life changing experiences. Sarah knows that and she excepts completely, even though she has changed her life completely. So I think multiculturalism is not dead in Britian just from what Sarah is doing for Little Bee, taking her in and making her apart of her new family. But I don't think Little Bee needs Sarah, Sarah needs Little Bee more then anything at this point in her life.

Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 27, 2014 10:37 PM
I see both sides in Little Bee. They are treated poorly in the detention center and only get let out because Yevette "did a favor for one of dem immigration man(68). Lawerence wants Sarah to call the police and get her out of the house "you know nothing about the woman. What if she comes into your room in the night with a kitchen knife? What if she's crazy?"(122). He thinks just because she is a refugee that she is danergous. He is being mean just because she is from another country. He is worried about being caught in Sarah's house with Little Bee in it and thinks he will lose his job if anyone finds out. Sarah on the other hand has sympathy for Little Bee, even though she knows she is illilegal and could get in trouble for housing her. Sarah takes Little Bee under her wing letting her stay for as long as she wants. So from this book I dont think multiculturlism is completely gone in Britian, but it could be leading into that.
Luke Henes's comment, January 28, 2014 10:23 PM
I also see both sides in Little Bee. When the girls get out of the immigration center, Mr. Ayers takes in the girls even with the risk that goes along with that. He knew the girls were going to get caught if they continued to walk around the city, so out of the kindness of his heart he took them in. Sarah also accepts Little Bee because she knows Little Bee has nowhere to go, and cannot ignore her for what happened in the past. We also see an acceptance of an immigrant through batman. He opens up to Little Bee and realizes she is a "goody". He also looks up to her as a big sister. Although some people are welcoming, others are not. There are those people like Lawrence and the people that work at the daycare place that question Sarah accompanying Little Bee.
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Jack William Casey's insight:

This article talks about the language barrier for African Immigrants to english speaking countries. The immigrants have to go through cultural and language struggles to get by in their new country. This is what Little Bee has to do when she comes to England. She struggles to learn the new culture that she has come to. "No, it is not the Queen's crown and scepter that rule in your land. It is her grammar and her voice. That is why it's desirable to speak the way she does" (6). Little Bee wants to try to speak the way of the land because this gives her hope that if she does,she will get by.

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Jeremy Collier's comment, January 21, 2014 12:00 PM
This article completely relates to the book because at the beginning, Little Bee spends a good amount of time explaining that to be an immigrant and to be able to make it in a foreign country, the immigrant must know how to speak the native tongue or they would be shipped back because the immigrant sounds different than the locals. "To survive you must look good or talk good" (6). Little Bee held onto her Pocket English Dictionary while she was in the detention center. The only way the "sari girl", Yevette, and Little Bee made it out of the detention center was because of Little Bee's ability to speak English to the taxi man on the phone. "'We are cleaners.' 'All right. It's true you don't talk like of them. Where do you want to go?'" (15) The other immigrants that were traveling with Little Bee would have had a nearly impossible time getting out of the detention center because of this 'language barrier.'
Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 21, 2014 9:22 PM
This article relates to the book because Little Bee struggles to learn the Queens English. She knew that to survive in England "you must look good or talk even better"(3) this comes in handy for Little Bee when she is being released with the three other girls is the only one who the taxi driver can understand. The other girls all tried to talk on the phone, but couldn't. I think that being able to talk proper English for a refugee is better than looking good because those girls wouldn't have gotten far if it weren't for Little Bee's language skills. The only problem for Little Bee is she is naive and doesn't understand certain culture things that the detention center didn't teach her. When she is talking to the can driver she calls him a "cock"(57) thinking she is complimenting him. There is a language barrier for immigrants and struggles to adjust to the different culture like Little Bee is.
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Inside the Syrian refugee camps, a silent epidemic - GlobalPost

Inside the Syrian refugee camps, a silent epidemic - GlobalPost | Little Bee | Scoop.it
GlobalPost
Inside the Syrian refugee camps, a silent epidemic
GlobalPost
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is the mental health affliction many people associate with war.
Weston Jacobs's insight:

This article talks about the struggles that refugees face every day in the camps. This is relevant to Little Bee because she suffered the same way the people of Syria are suffering in these refugee camps. 

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Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 27, 2014 10:56 PM
I think this article relates to the book Little Bee very well. Living in the detention center as a refugee for two years had its impact on poor Little Bee. She struggles serverly with PTSD, in and out of the detention center. She is afraid of the men, she makes herself look ugly by wearing unflattering clothes and "I wound a wide strip of cotton around my chest, to make my breasts small and flat"(6
Grace Catherine Geist's comment, January 27, 2014 11:01 PM
WHOOPS I am struggling. I wasn't done typing that so I will continue!!!! She is making herself undesirable because she is scared of the men and doesn't want them to talk to her. It doesn't seem like she got much help with her PTSD or her anxiety. Little Bee even says "the psychiatrist at the detnetion center was right, she could not do anything for me. I am still crazy"(149). That line breaks my heart, knowing that this little girl didn't get the help and attention she needs, instead the person who was suppose to be helping her made her think she was crazy. Life in refugee camps seems to be a difficult life.
Allie Dierks's comment, February 2, 2014 9:34 PM
This article written by Josh Wood gains access to information about the lives of people held in these Syrian refugee camps. The article talks about how most people at this camp are suffering from psychological conditions. It then goes on to say "because of these bad psychological conditions, there are a lot of social problems" (Wood). Reading that sentence can help readers connect this article to the book Little Bee. It is obvious that Little Bee has some social problems, particularly that deal with men. For example Little Bee tells us that "at night they kept the men in a different wing of the detention center. They caged them like wolves when the sun went down, but in the daytime the men walked among us, and ate the same food we did. I thought they still looked hungry. I thought they watched me with ravenous eyes" (Cleave 6). It is evident that Little Bee is terrified of men and it plays into her daily life even when she is out of the detention center. Together this article and the book help us realize that psychological problems come usually from a past event and are health problems that someone can not just get over quickly. Like Little Bee who is still dealing with problems that occurred before her stay in the immigration center, during her stay in the center and now after her release from the center, we can come to terms that these problems are very serious and can not be erased from the memory with a snap of the finger.
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Immigration detention -- THE FACTS. (cover story)

Allie Dierks's insight:

This article shows the statistics and facts about immigration and immigration detention. This shows similarity to the book Little Bee because Little Bee, the main character, was in an immigration detention center and recently left. Little Bee, along with three other friends, were not let out of the immigration center completely authorized though. It is said that, "10-15% of migration is "unauthorized" (17). The reason Little Bee and the three other girls that were with her got to leave the detention center is because Yevette, one of the girls, acted inappropriately to the white man who was working at this center. So to say that their leaving of the immigration center was authorized, that would be false. It is clear to us that Little Bee did not enjoy the immigration detention center. She shares that she saw her life in gray while staying there all two years. She didn't make contact with men either because she was terrified of them. She didn't feel safe at all around the men that stayed there. Even though Little Bee has left the center, all of her life seems the same. Mental heath is a huge issue when dealing with immigration centers, and "70% of detained asylum seekers reported poorer mental health after being detained" (17). Little Bee wasn't jumping for joy after being let out. She says, "Once you are ready to die, you do not suffer so badly from the horror. So I was nervous but I was smiling because I was ready to die, that morning they let us girls out of detention" (Cleave 50). The mental problems Little Bee is dealing with are continuing on into her life outside of the detention center. 

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Caroline Bourquin's comment, January 16, 2014 11:51 AM
"Many things arrive after death-sadness, questions, and policemen-and none of these can be answered when your papers are in in order" (80). Papers are very important to refugees and Little Bee didn't have hers when she left the detention center. If Little Bee gets caught with out her papers she will be put back in the detention center. Little Bee leaves the scene after the girls death because she knows she could get in trouble. The article shows that children in Thailand can be detained for five years. Immigration detention has grown in the past 25 years. Little Bee was only in the detention center for 2 years. She got lucky and got out even though she wasn't suppose to. "So when I say that I am a refugee, you must understand that there is no refuge" (46). Little Bee say this because life as a refugee is not easy living in a detention center. Little Bee would rather be out in England, living in the real world but she can't. It seems like all of the refugees want to get out of the detention center because they don't like it. The detention center does not seem like a nice place to be.
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The impact of immigration detention on children.

Allie Dierks's insight:

This article talks about how there can be damaging factors to children who are in immigration centers. They must be treated foremost as children, or otherwise these centers can badly affect them. 

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