Litteris
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Litteris
Reading and Writing in Digital Contexts. Leitura e produção textual em contextos digitais
Curated by Luciana Viter
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5 Reasons Textbooks Will Not Survive

5 Reasons Textbooks Will Not Survive | Litteris | Scoop.it
Textbooks cannot keep up with the way we work. At some point we need to come to terms with the costs and limitations of print resources. Inspired by Matt Miller's Ditch That Textbook and my own experience, this post explores five reasons why textbooks will not survive.

Via Nik Peachey
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Tania Cortés Alvarez's curator insight, May 31, 2017 9:29 PM
This article exposes all the reasons why textbooks will disappear, this is a true that we can hide, All is evolving even the way we read and find information... Today is about practicality.And, nowadays textbooks are not practical.
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 1, 2017 2:37 PM
The author of this post makes some interesting arguments. 
 
Jan Barnett's curator insight, June 8, 2017 8:30 PM
Its's time to think carefully
 
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Why You Should (And Shouldn't) Use Digital Textbooks - Edudemic

Why You Should (And Shouldn't) Use Digital Textbooks - Edudemic | Litteris | Scoop.it
We're living in the future. So why are a lot of students stuck with heavy print textbooks still? What would Steve Jobs say? Perhaps it's time to consider going digital.
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from eTexts in the Classroom
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92% of college students prefer print books to e-books, study finds

92% of college students prefer print books to e-books, study finds | Litteris | Scoop.it
If you imagine millennials are just young people entranced by their cellphones or tablet computers, you might want to think again. According to a new study, 92% of college students would rather do their reading the old-fashioned way, with pages and not pixels.

The finding comes from American University linguistics professor Naomi S. Baron, author of the book "Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World." Baron led a team that asked 300 college students in the United States, Slovakia, Japan and Germany how they preferred to read.

Via Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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