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Three new picture books worth a read - The Globe and Mail

Three new picture books worth a read - The Globe and Mail | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Three new picture books worth a read The Globe and Mail Marie-Louise Gay has been knocking it out of the park since 1984, publishing more than 25 books and winning the Governor General's Award for children's illustration twice.
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Why children's books are getting darker

Why children's books are getting darker | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
When should parents start introducing concepts of cruelty, poverty, death and disaster in literature? (is children's literature getting too dark?
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Coloring Outside the Lines: The Diversity Gap in Children’s Literature

Coloring Outside the Lines: The Diversity Gap in Children’s Literature | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Lee & Low Books is a children’s book publisher that specializes in multicultural literature.
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Children's literature in English Language Education E-Journal (CLELE journal) | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC - Notlurking.com

Children's literature in English Language Education E-Journal (CLELE journal) | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC - Notlurking.com | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Notlurking - Save, share and get various opinions on your shortened links.
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ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai?

ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai? | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Forget penning odes with a quill and parchment – predictive text is the poetry tool of the future according to Carol Ann Duffy, who believes "the poem is a form of texting ...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:09 AM

Coincidence that I'm finding articles that take me to thoughts of hypocrisy? Dunno, but I'm intrigued by how many very interesting articles I'm finding on the Stylist.co.uK website. A site otherwise devoted to the depths of superficiality to which one can delve in the fashion world.

 

Okay. Maybe fashionista-living will lead one to complete safisfaction with how a life has been spent. I just can't quite get past the lemming-ness of it.

 

Nevertheless, there are quite freguently very intriguing literary articles to be found on the site.

 

This one is a bit on the light side, but I'd bet there'd be some great possibilities for engaged learning here. The article presents the original poems, many often taught in schools, followed by a "translation" into "TEXT SPEAK," the shortcut text that pretty much every cell-phone tethered teen is quite familiar with.

 

I had an interesting thought as I read through these poems and their "translations." My guess is that those of us less "proficient" at TEXT SPEAK might find  a sort of fingernails-on-the-chalkboard (assuming many of us actually remember the sound of fingernails on the chalkboard!) ear-pain as the beauty of the original poetry clashes with our sense of the ugliness of the TEXT SPEAK translation.

 

Yet, in a sense, we might be responding as TSSL (Text Speak as Second Language) speakers. It may be that the disconnect isn't there for native TEXT SPEAKers. I wonder if they might read the TEXT SPEAK version, not only not bothered by the disconnect, but not even noticing it AND thereby potentially as equally moved by the beauty of the poem's sentiments as we might be less capable of appreciating because we are bothered by "poor translation."

 

I taught Candide for decades. I don't speak French, but for the first 2.5 decades, I gave little attention to the quality of the English translation. But, somewhere in the third decade, when ordering replacement copies, the district ordered copies with a different translation. And, I was shocked at what I perceived as the ugliness of the new translation.

 

The translation I'd used for 2.5 decades began...

 

"In Westphalia, in the castle of My Lord the Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckj, there was a young man whom nature had endowed with the gentlest of characters. His face bespoke his soul. His judgment was rather sound and his mind of the simplist..."

 

I loved the phrasing...

"endowed with the gentlest of characters"

"His face bespoke his soul."

"his mind of the simplest"

 

It was so poetic.

 

BUT The new translation! Oh my! It began...

 

"In the country of Westphalia, in the castle of the most noble Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh, lived a youth whom Nature had endowed with a most sweet disposition. His face was the true index of his mind. He had a solid judgment joined to the most unaffected simplicity..." 

 

How dry. How it "didn't sing" to me. How disappointed I was.

 

And then there was the reverse case experience. I'd read Don Quixote (well okay the famous parts anyway) and found it hilarious and a quite wonderful read. Then several years later, a "new translation" by Edith Grossman was published. The translation was heralded as being magnificent. And, it was. It brought a pulse to the read that I had not missed in my previous readings. But recognized immediately when compared to the new translation.

 

My point? Perhaps we see a degradation in going from an original version of the poems in this article to the TEXT SPEAK versions and thereby do not or can not appreciate the "translation" as I was never quite able to appreciate the "new" translation of Candide. While at the same time our students who are more comfortable with TEXT SPEAK are in a position more similar to my experience with Don Quixote in that the quality of the poorer earlier translations did not hamper my appreciation of the story at all and perhaps never would have hampered my appreciation had I not chosen to reread the book in its newer and better translation.

 

What if a students is moved by reading...

 

how do i ♥ thee? lt me count d ways.

i ♥ thee2 d depth & breadth & h8t

my soul cn reach, wen fEln out of site

4 d ends of bn & ideal grace.

 

He or she might be as moved as we were when we first read...

 

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.

 

I dunno why, but I think it might be easier for a student who loved the TEXT SPEAK version to transition to the traditional version and thereby find even more to appreciate (as I did moving from old Don Quixote to new Don Quixote translation) than it was for me to move the other direction as was the case when I moved from old Candide to new Candide.

 

We might be wary of how we express our opinion about what our kids read and enjoy and by doing so miss a great opportunity to move their existing appreciation to even higher levels by sharing the "better" translation.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Electric.com | Gatsby Explained

Lavishness and decadence stand as long-running motifs from F. Scott Fitzgerald's timeless classic,

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 18, 2013 9:55 AM

I remember when I discovered that F. Scott Fitzgerald lived the spitting image of the life style he criticized in The Great Gatsby.

 

I remember the song "I'm Easy" from the film Nashville being a quite moving love song written and performed by Keith Carradine) whose character in the film was a complete "player/hypocrite" in his own love life.


And of course there is  the long list of authors whose personal lives seemed to be tragically flawed in spite of the wisdom expressed in their work.


This article takes an interesting look at the comparison of the lifestyle of the actor and the character he or she portrayed in the recent adaptation of The Great Gatsby.


No. I don't suppose actors are hypocrites if they are very like the unlikeable characters they might play in their films. But this particular infographic provides for some amusing contemplations nevertheless.



 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature

Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Writing a novel (or a story, for that matter) is confusing work. There are just so many characters running all over the place, dropping hints and having revelations. So it's no surprise that many a...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 17, 2013 10:56 AM

Didn't anybody teach these people proper outlining formats???

 

I've noticed that the format of my notes often makes no difference at all. In fact, I frequently never reread my notes anyway; at least not thoroughly. Yet I take extensive notes. 

 

The value? The very pausing to capture an idea in the middle of a thought, abbreviating those thoughts, and scribbling those ideas frequently is enough to let those contemplations find a sticking place in my mind.

 

Ironically, traditional notetaking almost always never really worked for me. I'd spend so much time worrying about whether I was formatting my thoughts correctly that the contemplations and ideas I was trying to capture were fleeing in different directions while I was worrying about whether I was on a I., A., i, or a. level idea. And too often by the time I had decided whether a new thought ought to be enter as a I., B. level idea or whether it was a II., A level idea much of the idea had managed to successfully evade capture.

 

 I guess, Some things works wonders for some and Some things don't for others.

 

And, don't get me started on Robot Writing; you know the Five Paragraph Essay? The one that kids and college professors groan so much about.

 

Though in the case of the formal outline and the Five Paragraph Essay, they certainly have value in transitioning from chaos to the value of at least some level of ordered thinking. But, we should keep in mind and help our students come to understand that less chaos is not the only goal of ordered thinking. And, that Robot Thinking is only the lowest level of ordered OR Creative Thinking.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

 

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Is Contemporary Literature Post-Christian? | Mockingbird

Is Contemporary Literature Post-Christian? | Mockingbird | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
An essay in last week's NYTimes written by Paul Elie grabbed my attention, prodded me in the gut, and provoked some mixed reactions on my behalf. Written with a sensitivity to the oft-referenced 'post-Christian society,' Elie ...
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Kill Your Idols: A Case for Contemporary Literature

When I go out to eat, I often eavesdrop on the conversations of my fellow diners. Not long ago, I listened in on a particularly interesting discussion that involved two teachers. They were discussing a familiar quandary among ...
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Changing notions of identity and place in Central Asia - UCLA Asia Institute

Changing notions of identity and place in Central Asia - UCLA Asia Institute | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
UCLA Asia Institute
Changing notions of identity and place in Central Asia
UCLA Asia Institute
Naomi Caffee, who recently completed her Ph.D.
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Project MUSE - Children's Literature Association Quarterly-Volume ...

... and Journal Content on Project MUSE. OR. Books and Journals, Books, Journals. Browse > Literature > Children's Literature > Children's Literature Association Quarterly. From: Children's Literature Association Quarterly.
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50 Best Children's Literature Blogs - Zen College Life

50 Best Children's Literature Blogs - Zen College Life | Children's Literature | Scoop.it

"Inasmuch as we may like to reminisce about some of the books we read ourselves as children, this guide to the 50 Best Children’s Literature Blogs is more about modern books which young adults and teachers may want to incorporate into young lives in an educational way."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:28 AM

A quick listing of 50 Children's literature blogs with short preview comments and direct links. Way faster than having to find so many good leads oneself.

 

Just might be a great resource for teachers and their students' parents.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Monique German's curator insight, April 25, 2013 7:43 AM

Some of these blogs are already in my Feedly reader.  It looks like I may need to explore a few more. 

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Resources for Excellent Children's Literature ‹ Story Warren

Resources for Excellent Children's Literature ‹ Story Warren | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
I commend to you the following resources. Every home should own a copy of these books. Buy them for baby presents. Give them as Christmas and birthday gifts. Their pages are full of inspiration, exhaustive book lists, and ...
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Para trabajos sobre canon

 

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Children's books on the refugee experience are crucial reading - The Conversation

Children's books on the refugee experience are crucial reading - The Conversation | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Children's books on the refugee experience are crucial reading
The Conversation
But this personal angle, and the sympathy and understanding that it promotes, is hard to come by, especially in young children.
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In translation: nine authors pick their favourite children's fiction - The Guardian

In translation: nine authors pick their favourite children's fiction - The Guardian | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
The Guardian
In translation: nine authors pick their favourite children's fiction
The Guardian
This has been one of my favourite children's books for years.
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Children's literature in English Language Education E-Journal (CLELE journal) | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC

Children's literature in English Language Education E-Journal (CLELE journal) | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Children's literature in English Language Education E-Journal TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC http://t.co/TDbuiHVGyu via @sharethis
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Reviews of New Graphic Novels

Reviews of New Graphic Novels | Children's Literature | Scoop.it

The Children’s Literature and Reading Special Interest Group of IRA has taken a look at some of the newly published graphic novels this year and provided descriptions and teaching ideas to use in classrooms or to recommend for summer reading.


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dilaycock's curator insight, June 16, 2013 8:37 AM

Let's stick to calling graphic novels a format, not a genre. Varied use of the latter only causes confusion.

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Children's Literature | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Jonathan Jarc, GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:57 AM

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

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Storyville: 3 Essential Books You Should Read in Every Major Genre

Storyville: 3 Essential Books You Should Read in Every Major Genre | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Here are three essential books you should read in every major genre.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 17, 2013 1:10 PM

I remember being shocked when I discovered that the authors of published articles do not often get to title their articles. The reason being that unlike titling books, articles that are published in newspapers, magazines, and often online must live within layout restraints. 

 

Tradition has it that the best titles are as close to the same length as the line space in which it sits. One line titles with only a word or two and lots of white space on the right end of the line look like empty space as opposed to the much desired white space. This is particularly important when the layout  has the article text in multiple columns and the headline doesn't reach across the columns.

 

Okay that was a digression intended as a set up for my problem with this article's headline. The good news is that it demonstrates the desire to "fill the space." However, it does not accurately reflect the important point being made in the article and thereby implies something that happens to annoy me a bit.

 

The author does not say that he considers some books to be essential books for the article's readers. In fact, his very first sentence says that the list is subjective. And, his second sentence says that they happen to be the books he mentions because they were important to HIM. He even goes on to suggest that he doesn't address "Every Major Genre" in spite of what the headline says, pointing out that he has no listing for "Romance" writing because personally it isn't an important genre for him. He even ends the article by making the point that even though it's a personal list of HIS FAVORITES, his thesis is not that they are essential for everyone, but rather for an audience of people who happen to write in any of the genres he does include.

 

Okay. So what bothers me besides the misleading headline? The use of the word "essential." That's what bothers me.

 

The term reeks of the long held belief that the only literature of any merit worthy of being in the curriculum was that of "dead white guys."

 

That's sort of like refusing to think outside the small, hertetically sealed box.

 

There are many paths to gaining the benefits of literary reading. Shakespeare may or may not be essential for all. For many Neruda might serve a very similar purpose.

 

How many adults have become truly great thinkers without ever having read a single word of Shakespeare? And, conversely, hom many adults have become truly great thinkers specifically because they had encountered the wisdom of Shakespeare?

 

In the real world, it is often not a simplistic either / or situation. There can be many right answers and many right answers that are not right for everyone.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

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When Children's Literature is Not Defined by "Innocence" - Religion Dispatches

When Children's Literature is Not Defined by "Innocence" - Religion Dispatches | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
When Children's Literature is Not Defined by "Innocence"
Religion Dispatches
Jodi Eichler-Levine is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. She holds a joint appointment with the Women's Studies Program.
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Contemporary literature and traditional literature

Contemporary literature and traditional literature | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Please guys help me with this question i real need to know what's the different between traditional and contemporary definition of literature and what implications does each definition have for classroom literature teaching ...
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Confessions of a displaced hedgehog: How children's literature ...

I had a reason recently to look back at my early studies of children's literature, and it struck me that when I took my first undergrad course in Stockholm in 1982, some of the standard works you find today on any syllabus had ...
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Call for Papers: Scottish Children's Literature in the Nineteenth ...

The proposed volume, Scotland and Children's Literature in the Nineteenth Century, aims to freshly reconfigure the imaginative and cultural narratives of Scotland and children's literature in the long nineteenth century.
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Imagine There's No Gender: The Long History of Feminist Utopian Literature - The Atlantic

Imagine There's No Gender: The Long History of Feminist Utopian Literature - The Atlantic | Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Imagine There's No Gender: The Long History of Feminist Utopian Literature The Atlantic Cybernetics will eliminate the need for work; new reproductive technologies will eliminate the need for giving birth ("Pregnancy is barbaric...the temporary...

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What Kids Are Reading, In School And Out : NPR

What Kids Are Reading, In School And Out : NPR | Children's Literature | Scoop.it

 

Walk into any bookstore or library, and you'll find shelves and shelves of hugely popular novels and book series for kids. But research shows that as young readers get older, they are not moving to more complex books. High-schoolers are reading books written for younger kids, and teachers aren't assigning difficult classics as much as they once did.

 

At Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., the 11th-grade honors English students are reading The Kite Runner. And students like Megan Bell are reading some heavy-duty books in their spare time. "I like a lot of like old-fashioned historical dramas," Bell says. "Like I just read Anna Karenina ... I plowed through it, and it was a really good book."

 

But most teens are not forging their way through Russian literature, says Walter Dean Myers, who is currently serving as National Ambassador for Young People's Literature. A popular author of young-adult novels that are often set in the inner city, Myers wants his readers to see themselves in his books. But sometimes, he's surprised by his own fan mail.

 

"I'm glad they wrote," he says, "but it is not very heartening to see what they are reading as juniors and seniors." Asked what exactly is discouraging, Myers says that these juniors and seniors are reading books that he wrote with fifth- and sixth-graders in mind.

 

And a lot of the kids who like to read in their spare time are more likely to be reading the latest vampire novel than the classics, says Anita Silvey, author of 500 Great Books for Teens. Silvey teaches graduate students in a children's literature program, and at the beginning of the class, she asked her students — who grew up in the age of Harry Potter — about the books they like.

 

"Every single person in the class said, 'I don't like realism, I don't like historical fiction. What I like is fantasy, science fiction, horror and fairy tales.' "

 

Those anecdotal observations are reflected in a study of kids' reading habits by Renaissance Learning. For the fifth year in a row, the educational company used its Accelerated Reader program to track what kids are reading in grades one through 12.

 

Click headline to read more or listen to this NPR segment--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Ness R. Cuevas's curator insight, June 13, 2013 3:26 AM

Will publish also what my students in Grade 10 are reading.