Literacy in Social Studies
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Literacy in Social Studies
As teachers prepare for the implementation of Common Core Standards, you will find links about literacy in teaching social studies to expend your thinking!
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Moving toward a literacy action model- social studies

Moving toward a literacy action model- social studies | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

In my November 3 post I wrote about the continuous raw data that flows through Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, forums, and other social media tools. When we look at the data, we have to put in place filters to understand the information that is being presented. As we look at the data being presented, we have to think a different way in order to understand the message that is being communicated.

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Professional Development—A Key to Working with the Common Core Standards

Professional Development—A Key to Working with the Common Core Standards | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it
NCTM serves math teachers, math educators, and administrators by providing math resources and professional development opportunities. Working for more and better math for all students.

 

When the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) were released last year, a Joint Task Force of NCTM, NCSM, ASSM, AMTE was appointed to make recommendations to assist our respective members in implementing and assessing the new standards. Five priority recommendations made by that Joint Task force included the following recommendation:

Convene a panel of professional development experts to develop a conceptual framework for teacher professional development systems to support implementation of the Common Core State Standards at the school, district, and state levels.

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Common Core State Standards Initiative | Myths vs. Facts

Myths vs. Facts

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Why is Social Studies Text So Difficult to Read?

Why is Social Studies Text So Difficult to Read? | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

Social Studies textbooks are usually boring! They are often not a good fit for our learners today. Students feel that the study of old events and dead people have little relevance in their lives. Students find little emotional connections when events, facts, timelines, and dead people are taught. Too often historical topics are taught with little context of how past events and historical figures are related today’s issues.

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Who will teach kids to climb

Who will teach kids to climb | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

Here I shared some notes from watching this video with David Coleman talking about the shifts in literacy with the full implementation of Common Core Standards. Hearing David in this video allowed brough fresh and renewed eyes to my thinking about CCS. Two shifts have have caused lots of deep thinking and wonderings.

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Let’s make it real! Literacy in Social Studies

Let’s make it real! Literacy in Social Studies | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

I can count on one hand the things I remember learning in history. I learned that in 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue, that there was once a thing called slavery and it was abolished, that there have been several wars and battles, For me history was a lot of dates, strange names, places, and events presented as points on a line. The goal of history was to memorize all of these facts and dates, recite them on a test, and repeat the process the following week. Sadly, that was about it. It wasn’t until adulthood until I started listening to stories that were told by my father and other local historians. My dad told me a few stories of his time in WWII and I always wanted to hear more.

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Literacy in Social Studies: KWL revisited

Literacy in Social Studies: KWL revisited | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

It was 18 years ago that the KWL chart was introduced to me and it took me 10 years of teaching to figure out why using a KWL chart is an important thinking tool. It was four years ago I discovered it was a thinking tool rather than a graphic organizer. I hope to encourage you to revisit your thinking of why this tool is important. A KWL chart should be used to support what students know, what they are puzzled about, and think about what they are learning. The structure of this one tool can be helpful to help students support their own thinking during a unit of study. I want to revisit this thinking structure as thinking activity at the beginning of a unit.

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Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Common Core, Informational Text, and Reading

There's an overt belief in the Common Core State Standards (ELA) that reading a lot of informational text is the way one learns how to comprehend such text. To that end, the Standards specify the percentage of text types that learners must annually read:

Literary Informational

By Grade 4 50% 50%
By Grade 8 45% 55%
By Grade 12 30% 70%

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The Fischbowl: Just Write Poorly. In Public. Every Day.

Social Studies teachers should be writing daily. All teachers should write daily!

 

This begs the question, of course, about how much our teachers are writing. Particularly our Language Arts teachers, but really all of our teachers. If it's so important for our students to write, how come we're not modeling it?

Do you write every day? In public? Why or why not?

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10 Must Like Facebook Pages for Social Studies Teachers « History ...

10 Must Like Facebook Pages for Social Studies Teachers « History ... | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it
10 Must Like Facebook Pages for Social Studies Teachers. November 22, 2011 by glennw. It seems like everyone has a Facebook page. Companies, organizations, schools. I'm pretty sure my Jack Russell terrier has her own page.
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The Charleston Archive Challenge (Part 1)

The Charleston Archive Challenge (Part 1) | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

Thirty-four Berkeley County elementary school teachers passed archival boot camp at The Citadel on October 8. With guidance from area archivists and historians, the teachers learned the nuts and bolts of historical research, drawing on the documentary riches of Charleston’s archives. After being divided into groups of five, the K-5teachers were assigned topics, dispatched to various archives across the city, and tasked with designing a power point presentation—all in less than four hours.

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Why is digital writing so complex and challenging both for teachers ...

Why is digital writing so complex and challenging both for teachers ... | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it
Teachers who have mastered these tools and other social media tools see the importance and the relevance they play K-12 education. These teachers essentially are using these tools for their own professional ...
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Charleston Archival Challenge (part 3)

Charleston Archival Challenge (part 3) | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

I hoped Saturday was as much fun for you as it was for me. I had fun watching you learn. I watched how you shifted from being motivated extrinsically by the challenge (plus being a requirement for a graduate course) to watching how your intrinsic motivations took over. Your own curiosity took over.

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Forgetting history: State shouldn't leave social studies behind

Forgetting history: State shouldn't leave social studies behind | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it
Notably absent were history and social studies teachers. This is not unusual, given the traditional place of these disciplines at the bottom rung of the academic priority list. However, anyone who carefully reads the common core standards will realize that the exclusion of these teachers is misguided.

 

History and social studies are indeed an integral component of the common core, which posits an interdisciplinary approach to literacy. The common core standards address the persistent myth that only English teachers are responsible for teaching literacy by stating that "college and career readiness overwhelmingly focuses on complex texts outside of literature," and that "these standards also ensure students are being prepared to read, write, and research across the curriculum, including in history and science." They note further that this is best achieved "by ensuring that teachers in other disciplines are also focusing on reading and writing to build knowledge within their subject areas."
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PLAYBACK: Tweeting History, Literature and Politics, and the Future of News | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning

Tweeting History: The New York Times covers historical reenactments on Twitter this week with a story about@RealTimeWWII, which has grown to more than 15,000 followers since it started this past August. Alwyn Collinson, a recent Oxford University history graduate, has been live tweeting the events of World War II as they unfold in real time.

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Clickable Print.org + Printernet Publishing

Let me start by explaining how my recent inquiry has been motivated by three things. First, I’ve noticed over the last couple years that I rarely pull a History Primary Source Reader off the shelf for my students. Instead, I find excellent sources online. I just can’t find a Reader that gives my students all the relevant primary sources the World Wide Web can. Second, my department is engaged in a curriculum review process this year that has taken us to some very fundamental questions, like: should we attempt to cover the whole history of all human time between 7th and 11th grade (when our required courses end)? should we be focused on “coverage” or on “meaning-making”? what should students know and be able to do upon graduation? is it more important they know a lot of historical facts or that they can think like historians?

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Literacy in Social Studies: Sentence-Phrase-Word

Literacy in Social Studies: Sentence-Phrase-Word | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

We should get students to read during history class or any content class. With the resources that of massive amount of text at our finger tips, the Internet is a jewel for finding articles, primary source documents, images, etc. that connect to anything we are studying. When students are asked to read during history class, it is my job to scaffold the text for those struggling readers and promote even higher thinking to the other readers on the opposite end of the spectrum and to those in the middle.

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Education Week: More Argument, Fewer Standards

Mike Schmoker and Gerald Graff write that the new common-core standards in English/language arts are bloated and lacking a focus on an essential skill: argument.

 

If we want record numbers of students to succeed in postsecondary studies and careers, an ancient, accessible concept needs to be restored to its rightful place at the center of schooling: argument. In its various forms, it includes the ability to analyze and assess our facts and evidence, support our solutions, and defend our interpretations and recommendations with clarity and precision in every subject area. Argument is the primary skill essential to our success as citizens, students, and workers.

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Literacy in Action – Fear (Social Studies- Part 2)

Literacy in Action – Fear (Social Studies- Part 2) | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

In any period of rapid change (real or perceived) fear drives our emotions that add to our reluctance of change. I see this over and over as schools and school districts think about or don’t think at all about the role of social media for students, teachers and school administrators. Page 10 Exhibit 1.3 in Piercy and Piercy’s book Disciplinary Literacy is a list of new items over the last few years that drove fear in this country. Below I have added to that list:

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NWP and the Common Core Standards - National Writing Project

NWP and the Common Core Standards - National Writing Project | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

NWP is developing a variety of resources and online spaces to help educators provide the professional development necessary to implement the work of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

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I get talker’s block, too…….but i get writer’s block too…. and i can make blunders…

I get talker’s block, too…….but i get writer’s block too…. and i can make blunders… | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

Should we  not be giving out students more opportunity to write in our history classrooms?

 

I have learned that I am a better writer for the opportunity to write so poorly publicly. When I write those internal emails, I am so much better with grammar, word choice, and tone. (and i have learned too that it is so much better to pick up the phone and call people instead of an email).

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Sharing the Process: a (literally) hands-on approach to the literary essay « Universe As Text

Sharing the Process: a (literally) hands-on approach to the literary essay « Universe As Text | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

I’ve been working a lot with my AP Literature and Composition students on their writing skills. Writing about literature has many aspects that can be troublesome for student writers. One of the most difficult parts for my students has been learning to formulate an argument about a fictional work, and–in particular–using quotes in order to further the argument that they create, instead of inserting irrelevant narrative quotes to illustrate a glorified summary. Part of this, I think, has been due to their tendency to write an essay without quotes first, before going back and trying to “plug in” a quotation here and there. When done right, quotations should be the framework of the piece, upholding and elaborating the claims of the student writer.

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What's Global about the Common Core Standards?

What's Global about the Common Core Standards? | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it
by Margaret Reed Millar The Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) partnered together to define global competence and the skills and abilit (RT @Avenues_org How common core standards might...
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How can information literacy impact social capital? « International ...

The role of libraries in lifelong learning is examined, with specific reference to information literacy. The paper discusses the concept of social capital and the significance of lifelong learning to theories of social capital, which ...
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Archivist Challenge

Archivist Challenge | Literacy in Social Studies | Scoop.it

It has been a few weeks since the Charleston Archival Challenge and now I am thinking about the things I want to take away from such a professional development.

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