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Are #Pharma Brand drug Names Designed to Inform or to Confuse?

Are #Pharma Brand drug Names Designed to Inform or to Confuse? | Life Sciences | Scoop.it

Apparently, the branding of prescription pharmaceuticals is close to rocket science in complexity. The FDA has veto power over the monikers attached to all brand-name prescription drugs sold in the United States. (Generic drug names, which are often even more bizarre than their brand-name counterparts, go through a different and much more complicated approval process.)

 

When considering a brand name for approval, FDA reviewers run tests to see how likely it is that a proposed name could be mistaken for an already existing drug with a similar-sounding or similar-looking name. They do tests to catch names that might look alike when scribbled out on a prescription pad in the inscrutable handwriting of physicians.

 

They also reject any names that could be seen as a boast about the drug’s power or efficacy, which is why you won’t see any drugs named Cholesterol Busters, or Angina-B-Gone (too bad, I’d love to see a commercial for that one).

 

The net result of all this intense regulatory scrutiny is written in the bizarre names of those prescription drugs in the marketplace. The profusion of really strange names leaves consumers in a quandary. As one prominent medical professor put it, “Pharmaceutical product naming is designed to confuse, not to inform.”

 

We are truly blessed by all the drugs out there. They are expensive to develop, expensive to test, expensive to market, and sometimes very expensive to produce, but often they make our lives better or at least more bearable.

 

However, when it comes naming these products, I would suggest to the FDA that “simpler is better and simplest is best.” Sadly, all too often it seems the drug names can be much more complex and exotic than the disease itself.


Via Pharma Guy
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, December 8, 2014 6:35 AM


I must admit that some names like farxiga are not only confusing, but darn near impossible to pronounce. I think the DTC commercials on TV for this product should come up with a nifty way to help consumers remember how pronounce the name -- like this video by Boehringer that helped me learn how to pronounce its name: How DO You Pronounce "Boehringer Ingelheim"? After all, if the goal is to get the consumer to ask their patient for the drug, they should know how to pronounce it. I've seen the commercial several times, and still am not sure of the proper pronunciation.

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Transparency trends, regulations push sponsor commitment to publish clinical trial results

Transparency trends, regulations push sponsor commitment to publish clinical trial results | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Clinical trial sponsors plan to release more trial results summaries over the next year as part of patient engagement efforts, according to a recent survey.

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Clinical trial studying e-cigs

Clinical trial studying e-cigs | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
When he runs into a burning building with an oxygen mask on, Ryan Moss feels like a hypocrite because he's filled his lungs with tobacco smoke for 17 years.
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Why Clinical Trials Should Be At The Forefront of Public Science Knowledge

Why Clinical Trials Should Be At The Forefront of Public Science Knowledge | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
I originally wrote this post as a guest feature on 'An Anxious Scientist'. The piece was originally published at the beginning of August, and I’ve republished it here with permission from Rebecca who runs An Anxious Scientist. Make sure you take a look at her blog for brilliant posts explaining complex science concepts in engaging…
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Cancer vaccines, long considered failures, are hot again

Cancer vaccines, long considered failures, are hot again | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Successful sister fields of cancer research have spurred scientists and investors to give cancer vaccines another look.
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NIH controversy: Should human mind and brain research be considered clinical trials | Genetic Literacy Project

NIH controversy: Should human mind and brain research be considered clinical trials | Genetic Literacy Project | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Scientists studying human behaviour and cognitive brain function are up in arms over a plan by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) to classify most
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Medical Affairs Teams Typically Start Company-Driven Medical Education Programs During Registration and Launch

Medical Affairs Teams Typically Start Company-Driven Medical Education Programs During Registration and Launch | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
New analysis of over a dozen life science firms found that 60% of surveyed teams begin company driven medical education activities during the registration and
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Synlogic Receives Fast Track Designation in U.S. for Lead Candidate, SYNB1020

Synlogic Receives Fast Track Designation in U.S. for Lead Candidate, SYNB1020 | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Synlogic granted Fast Track Designation from the FDA for investigational Synthetic Biotic medicine, SYNB1020, as a treatment for urea cycle disorders.
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2017 Marketing News Marketing For Pharma And Retail Industries

Pharma and device logistics medical devices packaging pharmaceutical retail technology webinars. 24 feb 2017 1 (january 2017) of pharma marketing news. D
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Open your bedroom window at night to prevent obesity and type 2 diabetes, says Oxford prof 

Open your bedroom window at night to prevent obesity and type 2 diabetes, says Oxford prof  | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Opening your bedroom window at night to allow in a cool breeze could be simple, if chilly, way of preventing obesity and Type 2 diabetes, an Oxford University academic has suggested.
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Medicine safety tips that could save your life

Medicine safety tips that could save your life | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Learn about important medical safety tips that could save your life.
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Direct-to-Consumer #Pharma Drug Ad Spending at an All-Time High

Direct-to-Consumer #Pharma Drug Ad Spending at an All-Time High | Life Sciences | Scoop.it

Spending on direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical ads rose 9% to $5.6 billion in 2016 [see note below], in part fueled by a 16% boost in spending from Bristol-Myers Squibb, according to data from Nielsen.

Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb again took the two top spots among drugmakers, spending $1.1 billion and $458 million, respectively, on DTC ads. AbbVie, Eli Lilly, and Allergan rounded out the top five DTC spenders. The Nielsen figures include business to business, outdoor, cinema, television, magazine, newspaper, and radio media spend, but not digital.

Newer brands to the top 20 list in 2016 include Novartis' heart-failure drug Entresto ($122 million), Novo Nordisk's diabetes treatment Victoza ($128 million), Celgene's psoriasis drug Otezla ($96 million), and Eli Lilly's diabetes drug Trulicity ($184 million).

The Celgene ad is under scrutiny by regulators. The drugmaker received an untitled letter from the FDA's Office of Prescription Drug Promotion last year over its DTC ad for Otezla, which said the ad's use of loud music and attention-grabbing visuals downplayed the risk information presented therein (here).

When broken down by channel, pharma companies spent less on cinema, newspaper, and radio media last year but sharply increased their investment in outdoor media by 552%. Business to business, television, and magazine media spend also grew, by 31%, 11%, and 6%, respectively.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 6, 2017 10:33 AM

Note: The 2016 data comes from Neilsen. The data in my chart for 2014 and 2015 comes from Kantar Media, which generally reports slightly higher numbers. In 2015, for example, Kantar estimated the DTC spend to be $5.4 billion whereas Neilsen estimated it to be around $5.2. Whatever the source, it is clear that DTC ad spending is at an all-time high. I included data from AARP regarding its estimate of % price increase for drugs used by older Americans.

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The long-term effect of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: A randomized clinical trial

The long-term effect of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: A randomized clinical trial | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Physician Assistant Article: The long-term effect of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: A randomized clinical trial
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Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D3 with narrow-band UV type B light: Effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional prof...

Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D3 with narrow-band UV type B light: Effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional prof... | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Physician Assistant Article: Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D<sub>3</sub> with narrow-band UV type B light: Effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional profiles of skin and blood
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Go Vitamin D!
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7 big benefits to social media clinical trial recruitment

7 big benefits to social media clinical trial recruitment | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Social media clinical trial recruitment may cause wariness to companies in a highly regulated industry. But it is a valuable tool with big benefits.
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Avon Lifesciences to table results

Avon Lifesciences to table results | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Read more about Avon Lifesciences to table results on Business Standard. On 14 September 2017
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GSK's potential blockbuster shingles vaccine earmarked for US approval

GSK's potential blockbuster shingles vaccine earmarked for US approval | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Drugmaker GSK has received a boost after its potential blockbuster vaccine for shingles was earmarked for approval by US regulators.
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Managing the new NIH requirements for clinical trials – Coffeehouse

Managing the new NIH requirements for clinical trials – Coffeehouse | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
If you work on an NIH funded study that involves biomedical or behavioral variables, you should be paying attention to the new requirements about clinical trials. Read more →
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New flu drug performs well in early clinical trial

New flu drug performs well in early clinical trial | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Researchers are reporting that a phase 1 clinical trial of the drug radavirsen, an drug to fight influenza, is safe and well-tolerated in healthy individuals.
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Alnylam Reports New Positive Clinical Results for Givosiran (ALN-AS1), an Investigational RNAi Therapeutic for the Treatment of Acute Hepatic Porphyrias

Alnylam Reports New Positive Clinical Results for Givosiran (ALN-AS1), an Investigational RNAi Therapeutic for the Treatment of Acute Hepatic Porphyrias | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.&nbsp;(Nasdaq:ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today new positive interim results from Part C, coh
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Meet the dogs with OCD

Meet the dogs with OCD | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Curiously, and perhaps eagerly, I am looking at a bull terrier named Sputnik, searching for a resemblance.
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Progress towards bionic eye implants

Progress towards bionic eye implants | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Silicon nanowires and wireless technology combine to produce potential high-resolution implant to restore sight
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University of Miami's Miami project successfully completes SCI clinical trial

University of Miami's Miami project successfully completes SCI clinical trial | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, recently announced the publication in the February issue of the Journal of Neurotrauma its first Food and Drug Administration approved Phase I clinical trial involving Schwann cells used to repair the damaged spinal cord.
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FDA Lifts Clinical Hold on Seattle Genetics Trials | GEN Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News - Biotech from Bench to Business | GEN

FDA Lifts Clinical Hold on Seattle Genetics Trials | GEN Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News - Biotech from Bench to Business | GEN | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Company will resume two Phase I trials affected by the clinical hold, while a Phase I/II study will not continue due to “challenges of developing therapies in this specific setting
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Because of Potential Abuse, Orphan Drug Act Might Need to Be “Repealed & Replaced”

Because of Potential Abuse, Orphan Drug Act Might Need to Be “Repealed & Replaced” | Life Sciences | Scoop.it

Building on weeks of mounting pressure to address high prescription drug prices, three influential U.S. senators have asked the government's accountability arm to investigate potential abuses of the Orphan Drug Act.

 

In a letter to the U.S. Government Accountability Office, Sens. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Tom Cotton, R-Ark., raised the possibility that regulatory or legislative changes might be needed "to preserve the intent of this vital law" that gives drug makers lucrative incentives to develop drugs for rare diseases.

 

"While few will argue against the importance of the development of these drugs, several recent press reports suggest that some pharmaceutical manufacturers might be taking advantage of the multiple designation allowance in the orphan drug approval process," the letter published Friday states.

 

In January, NPR published a Kaiser Health News investigation that found the orphan drug program is being manipulated by drug makers to maximize profits and to protect niche markets for medicines being taken by millions (read “Orphan Drug Sales Offer a Glimpse of ‘Sheer Greed’”; http://sco.lt/9ErY1p).

 

Congress overwhelmingly passed the 1983 Orphan Drug Act to motivate pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs for people whose rare diseases had been ignored. Drugs approved as orphans are granted tax incentives and seven years of exclusive rights to market drugs that are needed by fewer than 200,000 patients in the U.S.

 

In recent months, reports of five- and six-figure annual price tags for orphan drugs have amplified long-simmering concerns of abuse of the law. The senators' call for a GAO investigation reflects that sentiment.

 

The senators asked the GAO for a list of drugs approved or denied orphan status by the Food and Drug Administration. It also asked whether resources at the FDA, which oversees the law, have "kept up with the number of requests" from drug makers and whether there is consistency in the department's reviews.

 

The Kaiser Health News investigation found that many drugs that now have orphan status aren't entirely new. More than 70 were drugs first approved by the FDA for mass-market use. Those include cholesterol blockbuster Crestor (read “#Pharma Welfare: ‘Orphan’ Blockbuster Drugs on Rise - Including Crestor!; http://sco.lt/4pauhN), Abilify for psychiatric disorders and rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira, the world's best-selling drug.

 

Others are drugs that have received multiple exclusivity periods for two or more rare conditions. About 80 drugs fall into this category, including cancer drug Gleevec and wrinkle-fighting drug Botox.

 

Further Reading:

“Orphan Drug Sales: An Enduring Prospect for #Pharma Profits”; http://sco.lt/5oCT1V"Orphan Drugs Now Where the Money Is"; http://bit.ly/pgdaily111113-3A ;        

 


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Results of Many Clinical Trials Take Years to Publish - MedicineNet

Results of Many Clinical Trials Take Years to Publish - MedicineNet | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Medical researchers conducting the majority of clinical trials in the United States fail to report their results in a timely manner, new research reveals.
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