Life on a small rock
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Rescooped by Stephen Stokes from Life on a small rock
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Build a Diverse Group of Friends

Build a Diverse Group of Friends | Life on a small rock | Scoop.it
To grow as a person, it's important to go beyond our "comfort zone" of people and seek relationships with those who are wildly different from us.

Via Sharrock, Stephen Stokes
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Sharrock's curator insight, March 27, 2013 11:43 AM

We educators have difficulties expanding our horizons, networking for real professional growth. Maybe this is true for people, in general. After all, the author indicates what almost all of us believe, that “Every single person we choose to associate with brings out a different side of us. Therefore, the more diverse our group of friends is, the more dynamic and flexible we become as an individual.” But the proof is "in the pudding." We don't do this, really. there is even a name for our behavior: the similarity attraction effect. The author provides excellent instruction, "Be interested in people in general. Everyone has their own stories and peculiarities. When you approach everyone with the intent to get to know them and understand them, you’ll often find that most people are pretty damn awesome in their own way."

 

 

Rescooped by Stephen Stokes from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Scoop.it!

Build a Diverse Group of Friends

Build a Diverse Group of Friends | Life on a small rock | Scoop.it
To grow as a person, it's important to go beyond our "comfort zone" of people and seek relationships with those who are wildly different from us.

Via Sharrock
more...
Sharrock's curator insight, March 27, 2013 11:43 AM

We educators have difficulties expanding our horizons, networking for real professional growth. Maybe this is true for people, in general. After all, the author indicates what almost all of us believe, that “Every single person we choose to associate with brings out a different side of us. Therefore, the more diverse our group of friends is, the more dynamic and flexible we become as an individual.” But the proof is "in the pudding." We don't do this, really. there is even a name for our behavior: the similarity attraction effect. The author provides excellent instruction, "Be interested in people in general. Everyone has their own stories and peculiarities. When you approach everyone with the intent to get to know them and understand them, you’ll often find that most people are pretty damn awesome in their own way."