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Two NanoSatisfi CubeSats Deployed from ISS | Parabolic Arc

Two NanoSatisfi CubeSats Deployed from ISS | Parabolic Arc | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station successfully deployed two NanoSatisfi CubeSats named ArduSat-1 and ArduSat-X this morning.  They also deployed a Vietnamese micro satellite, named Pico Dragon from the orbital outpost.

 

The ArduSat spacecraft have pre-built experiments such as measuring the Earth’s magnetic field that can be run by students across the world. Students are also free to design custom experiments and applications.

 

Students of four can purchase a full week to control the satellite for $1,000. “In addition, every seat comes with full access to our online curriculum and Mission Control Center where students can learn about space science, physics and computer programming (with Arduino)—not to mention, control a satellite directly from their Internet browser,” according to NanoSatisfi’s website.

 

 


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Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers - NPR (blog)

Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers - NPR (blog) | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it
NPR (blog)
Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers
NPR (blog)
The chip, known as Arduino, is cheap and easy to use.

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Weekly wrap-up: First open-source satellite goes to space, 3D-printed keys and ... - opensource.com

Weekly wrap-up: First open-source satellite goes to space, 3D-printed keys and ... - opensource.com | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it

Satellite dreams come true. If you’ve ever dreamed of having access to satellites in space, your dream is about to become a reality. San Francisco-based NanoSatisfi is launching the world’s first open source satellites (called "CubeSats") into space this week, reports New Scientist. Those who helped fund the project on Kickstarter will be among the first to run experiments on the satellites, which run Arduino. There may be other time slots available for programming and experimenting.


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#EDCMOOC - Week 1 Scaffolding to Avoid Dropping Out

#EDCMOOC - Week 1 Scaffolding to Avoid Dropping Out | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it
I've dropped out of a MOOC before, so when I started participating in a MOOC (Massive Online Open Course) called E-learning and Digital Cultures last week I wanted to set myself up for success. To ...

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The Learning Verve's insight:

The onlline application used to create the interactive image caught my attention. ThingLink http://www.thinglink.com/learn

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Don't SWETT it Solutions's curator insight, February 5, 2013 9:39 AM

Preparing for a MOOC with purpose! A helpful post By @sorokti using @thinglink

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ArduSat - Your Arduino Experiment in Space

We love Arduino and we love space exploration. So we decided to combine them and let people run their own space experiments! (ArduSat - Un satelite open-source con hardware Arduino en el espacio.

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Send an Arduino to the moon for $300

Send an Arduino to the moon for $300 | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it
We’ve seen Kickstarter campaigns to put a single satellite into space and one to launch your own personalized postage-stamp sized satellite into low Earth orbit. This time, though, you can break the bonds of Earth and send your own Arduino...

 

 

 


Via F. Thunus, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY
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F. Thunus's curator insight, June 30, 2013 5:00 PM

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Space Exploration on the Cheap: Kickstarter Sensation NanoSatisfi will Launch in 2013

Space Exploration on the Cheap: Kickstarter Sensation NanoSatisfi will Launch in 2013 | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it

While information technology may be advancing exponentially—the pace of the space race has seemed glacial since the 1970s. By now, most of us are used to a top-down, monolithic model of space exploration with associated costs liable to make Dr. Evil blush. The message? Space exploration is not for you.

 

But a new generation of space startups is aiming to change all that. It’s the people’s space race, and companies like San Francisco’s NanoSatisfi dream of making space exploration affordable and accessible for students, researchers, and hobbyists. While SpaceX grabs glitzy headlines by lowering launch costs (who doesn’t like rockets?), NanoSatisfi is working the other end of the equation. How to increase the efficiency of every pound we send up—and how to better harness the market to innovate further improvements.

 

If all goes to plan, NanoSatisfi will have supporters of their Kickstarter sensation ArduSat snapping photos, uploading applications, and running experiments from orbit within a year. NanoSatisfi is based out of a collective workspace provided by tech incubator, Lemnos Labs, and situated near the ballpark in downtown San Francisco. Upon arrival, one is greeted by a nondescript front door sporting a few haphazardly labeled buzzers. The team works alongside a number of other tech startups. One group is laboring over hamburger technology. Another has their eye on the perfectly roasted coffee bean. A third is working on commercial unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) tech. And nestled in with the rest, NanoSatisfi is designing and building satellites.

 

Huge satellite projects, years in the making, rarely if ever make the most of the newest technology. Further, they are extremely costly, non-standard, and require highly specialized technical skills to build and operate. NanoSatisfi (and others) aim to tear down these barriers to entry with the CubeSat. CubeSats are standardized small satellites, 10 centimeters to a side and weighing a kilogram or less. They are cheaper to build and launch (by orders of magnitude) than traditional satellites. But CubeSats alone are still fairly expensive—a few hundred grand, all in.

 

So, NanoSatisfi will design, build, and launch their own CubeSat—and here’s the key—with a user-programmable Arduino-based computer and a suite of 20 instruments. Researchers, students, and hackers can then rent satellite time and upload applications to the CubeSat from Earth for a modest sum. Platzer notes, “Disruptive technology makes non-users into users.” Because of the costs and technical hurdles of space exploration there are many, many non-users. Pretty much all of us in fact. But provide an uplink to a pre-fabricated CubeSat already in orbit, and you open the field to thousands. Platzer says NanoSatisfi chose Kickstarter to validate the product in the marketplace and gauge demand. Post-Kickstarter they’ve opened a $1 million angel round to fund the next phase of the business. “The angel round is doing very well. We literally started beginning of last week, and as of today, we are 75% done already.” The firm is searching for advisors and wants to assemble a board rich with experience and talent. “At the end of the day, I’m 100% invested in the success of the company, and if that means we give up a little equity early on, then we do that.” For now, the team is focused on their Kickstarter project, ArduSat—a user controlled Arduino-based computer and sensor array, housed in a GOMSpace 1U CubeSat powered by solar panels.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Aurelien
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The Global Search for Education: What Will Finland Do Next? - Huffington Post (blog)

The Global Search for Education: What Will Finland Do Next? - Huffington Post (blog) | Life Long Love of Learning | Scoop.it
The Global Search for Education: What Will Finland Do Next?
Huffington Post (blog)
2013-01-13-cmrubinworldperuskoulu_16500.jpg.
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