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Is Privacy Really Dead?

Is Privacy Really Dead? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Yes, I’m still focused on Michael Hyatt’s book, Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World. Great book! Go read it.
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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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Five tips to help you make the most of reading to your children

Five tips to help you make the most of reading to your children | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Reading to your child is one of the most successful ways of instilling a love of reading in them. But in our recent study, more than one-quarter of primary-school-aged respondents claimed they were never read to at home.

Children typically enjoy being read to, and see educational, social and emotional benefits to the practice. But families are busy, and finding time to read aloud can be eaten up by the demands of everyday life.

Not all parents have been read to themselves as children, so may not have experienced a model they can then follow with their own children. And many adult Australians may be struggling readers themselves.

With this in mind, here are five suggestions that can help make the experience of reading to your children fun, relaxing and educational.

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How to Work out of a Library (No Matter What Size Town You’re In)

Whether your local library is in the heart of a big city or nestled in a small town, it is likely a great place to get some work done.

Libraries are open to all, they come equipped with wifi and business amenities that freelancers, independent professionals and entrepreneurs need, and they provide a quiet place to focus.

Here’s an overview of working out of your local library, no matter what size town you’re in:

Libraries have Wifi

Regardless of your profession, chances are good that you need wifi access. From emails and social media to website development, graphic design and consultation, reliable wifi is a must-have. It has become a core part of library offerings around the world.

Workspace Variety

Some days you may want to work at a community table, while other days you may be heads-down and focused on a project or meeting with a client in a sitting area. Libraries offer a variety of workspaces, depending on what you need on any given day.
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What Does a Library Technician Do - Job Description

What Does a Library Technician Do - Job Description | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

A library technician is one member of a library's staff. He or she may work in public, academic, school, medical, law, or government agency libraries.

Working under the supervision of a librarian, this paraprofessional acquires and organizes materials, lends resources to patrons,  and organizes and reshelves items after patrons or users return them.
The scope of a library technician's duties varies according to the size of the facility.
In some libraries, he or she may answer routine questions, teach patrons or users how to use resources, and plan programs. Many also have clerical duties including answering telephones and filing.

Quick Facts
Library technicians earn a median salary $32,890 annually or $15.81 per hour (2016).
This occupation employs approximately 99,000 people (2016).
Employers include public, school, university, law, medical, and corporate libraries.
About two out of three jobs are part-time positions.
Library technicians can expect a good job outlook according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This government agency expects employment to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations between 2016 and 2026.

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Vancouver Central Library Afternoon Enlightenment

Vancouver Central Library Afternoon Enlightenment | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

There’s an interesting phenomena for anyone walking in late afternoon around 350 West Georgia and going into the central atrium of the Vancouver Downtown Central Library. The sunlight angles come right through into the galleria, creating pattern on pattern, and playing with angles and light.

After a long winter, it is a great sight to see, and a few people deviated from their walking route specifically to walk through the light patterned space.

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Author James Patterson donating $2M to classroom libraries | TribLIVE

Author James Patterson donating $2M to classroom libraries | TribLIVE | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — James Patterson is stepping up his game.

The best-selling author has increased his annual donations for classroom libraries from $1.75 million to $2 million. Scholastic Inc. told The Associated Press on Monday that Patterson is distributing 4,000 gifts of $500 each to teachers around the country. The so-called “Patterson Pledge” was launched in 2015 is run in coordination with Scholastic Book Clubs, which adds book club points to Patterson's contributions.

Over the past few years, Patterson has also given millions of dollars to bookstores and educational programs and endowed thousands of college scholarships for teachers.
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James Patterson to Donate $2 Million Dollars For Classroom Libraries in 2018

James Patterson to Donate $2 Million Dollars For Classroom Libraries in 2018 | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
James Patterson will personally donate $2 million to teachers to build classroom libraries this year, in the fourth year of his School Library Campaign.

In partnership with Scholastic Book Clubs, this year’s Patterson Pledge program focuses once again on teachers: 4,000 individual recipients will receive grants of $500 and 500 Scholastic Book Club Bonus Points to enhance and supplement their classroom libraries.

[Our emphasis] James Patterson has increased his pledge from $1.75 million in past years to $2 million in 2018 to address the dire need for funding exemplified by last year’s campaign, which drew a record 82,622 applicants – more than three times the amount received in 2015 and 2016 combined.

James Patterson said, “I was humbled to see the overwhelming response to last year’s grant campaign, and I’m happy to to reach even more teachers this time around. I can’t underscore enough how important books and reading are to a child’s development – better readers make better people, and ultimately better citizens. I’m so grateful for the teachers who are doing imperative work with students every day, in every school in the country. These grants are my way of acknowledging their extraordinary efforts.”

The Patterson Pledge was launched in 2015 as part of an ongoing effort to keep books and reading a priority for children in the United States Research from the Scholastic Teacher & Principal School Report: Equity in Education highlights the need for more support in schools as 31% of teachers reported having fewer than 50 books in their classroom libraries and more than half of teachers (56%) use their own money to purchase books.
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School pupils bring the fight for school libraries to Theresa May | The Bookseller

School pupils bring the fight for school libraries to Theresa May | The Bookseller | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
A group of school pupils are to petition the prime minister to save school libraries arguing that "knowledge is not a privilege".

The students, who are also budding librarians, will be making a trip to 10 Downing Street to hand in letters about the importance and value of school libraries to prime minister Theresa May this Friday (16th March).

This follows a letter by library and information association CILIP, co-signed by over 150 authors, including Philip Pullman and Malorie Blackman, calling on the government to halt the decline in school library provision and the numbers of qualified librarians in state-funded schools and colleges in England.

The pupils, finalists for the Pupil Library Assistant of the Year Award, will attend a special ceremony on Friday 16th March at Portcullis House, Westminster before walking the short distance to Downing Street at 4pm. They will be accompanied by authors Tanya Landman and Steve Cole.

In the letters the pupils emphasise that knowledge is "not a privilege" and the right to learn through reading should be available to everyone.

"Knowledge is not privilege, and one cannot penalise those without privilege by taking away the means by which they can build their understanding of planet Earth", said one of the letters.
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Is It Worth 1,000 Words? Mark Sarvas on Writing Art in Fiction | Literary Hub

Is It Worth 1,000 Words? Mark Sarvas on Writing Art in Fiction | Literary Hub | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Like so many readers, my first exposure to a painting in literature came from Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. In our first glimpse of the titular picture, it is described as no more than a “full-length portrait of a young man of extraordinary personal beauty.” We learn more about the picture through dialogue, as Lord Henry Wotton, who thinks it the best work his friend Basil Hallward has ever done, describes its subject:

I really can’t see any resemblance between you, with your rugged strong face and your coal-black hair, and this young Adonis, who looks as if he was made out of ivory and rose-leaves.

As a young reader, I didn’t immediately appreciate how quickly and how fully Wilde allowed me to perceive the canvas in question. If writing about music is like dancing about architecture, what is writing about painting? Unlike music, painting gives us something visual to hang on to but, for all that, it strikes me as only marginally less challenging to write about, moving something from its medium of strength—the visual, the seen—to a compromised secondary language that is forever striving to create, at best, an impression of an original that is always fated to fall short.

Yet literature is full of paintings, once you start looking for them. Most recently, a painting was the center of Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, but the tradition goes far into the past.
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Why is a Harvard Business Professor Studying Independent Bookstores? | Literary Hub

Why is a Harvard Business Professor Studying Independent Bookstores? | Literary Hub | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Why might MBA students care about independent bookstores? A glance at financial news will tell you we are living through an unprecedented shift in the way people shop. "Retail apocalypse" is not just a poetic phrase, but a widely recognized term bandied about on trading floors and boardrooms as brick and mortar
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Books which feature public libraries

Books which feature public libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Adult Books – Fiction

The Abortion: An Historical Romance 1966 – by Richard Brautigan 
Ajax Penumbra – Robin Sloan. 
Among others – Jo Walton. 
Angels and Demons – Dan Brown.
Body in the Library – Agatha Christie.
Book Lady – Malcolm Forsythe. 
Book of Speculation – Erika Swyler.
Book Thief – Marcus Zusak. Features a large personal library.
Borrower – Rebecca Makkai. “
Camel bookmobile – Masha Hamilton.
Camel Club 
Case of the Missing Books – Ian Sansom.
Conan the Librarian 
Crosstalk – Connie Willis.
Dead Virgin – KM Ashman.

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Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Reaches 100 Million Book Milestone

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Reaches 100 Million Book Milestone | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

From its infancy in Sevier County, Tennessee, to the largest children’s literacy program in the world, Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library has introduced millions of children around the globe to the fun of reading. Yesterday, Parton herself enshrined the 100-millionth book distributed in the program’s existence into the Library of Congress.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180228005041/en/

Dolly Parton enshrined the 100 millionth book distributed from her Imagination Library into the Library of Congress on Tuesday. The 100 millionth book is Dolly Parton's Coat of Many Colors, the adaptation of her hit song of the same name. (Graphic: Business Wire)

In addition to the extraordinary moment for Parton, the Imagination Library and Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced a monthly reading program for young readers at the Library of Congress.

“I always like to say that 100 million books have led to 100 million stories,” Parton said. “I am so honored that our little program has now grown to such a point that we can partner with the Library of Congress to bring even more stories to children across the country.”

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Libraries Are a Space Where Everyone Belongs

Libraries Are a Space Where Everyone Belongs | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people. It is a never-failing spring in the desert.”
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New Changing Landscape™ Report The intrinsic value of libraries as public spaces –

New Changing Landscape™ Report The intrinsic value of libraries as public spaces – | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Changing Landscape™ Report
The intrinsic value of libraries as public spaces

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Yes, Bookmobiles Are Still a Thing. (We Checked.)

Yes, Bookmobiles Are Still a Thing. (We Checked.) | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
MAYFIELD, Ky. — The van comes to a stop just as it reaches the hens. A bleating lamb is the first to greet Sandra Hennessee as she opens the van door and lets in the midday sun.

To get here, on an Amish farm in rural western Kentucky, Hennessee headed west from the small town of Mayfield and drove for miles on a two-lane road, passing churches, farms and open fields. With every bend and bump in the road, the wooden shelves inside the 27-year-old van creaked. With every stop, the hundreds of plastic-wrapped and paperback books on the shelves shifted.

Now on the farm, a woman dressed in a floor-length blue skirt, a black jacket, boots and a bonnet climbs inside. “Hi, honey,” Hennessee says. “What can I help you find?”

As the Graves County Public Library bookmobile librarian, Hennessee says she serves some of the most isolated areas of her community. She delivers books to some of the loneliest widows and some of the poorest children, but, according to her, “it’s not really about the books.”

“I’m a trash taker-outer, I’m a mail-getter, I’m a mechanic, I’m a social worker, I’m a snake killer,” she said. “You do what needs doin.’”
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Charter Schools, Segregation, and School Library Access

Charter Schools, Segregation, and School Library Access | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

While budget cuts in education over the last decade have had a major impact on the numbers of school libraries and librarians, decisions aren’t made in a vacuum. Prioritizing spending on certain activities over others reflects values related to the purpose of schools, revealed by policy decisions over several decades.

Public education policies that have devalued school libraries and librarians include the expansion of choice policies and charter schools, linked to gaping inequity resulting from a lack of desegregation policies. Research shows that choice reforms, such as charters, have perpetuated a deeply inequitable system where students are increasingly segregated by race and socioeconomic status.

The expansion of charter schools and segregation informs the national trends in school libraries—but how? A close data analysis unpacks some of the reasons. In addition, two regional case studies, in Chicago and California, indicate serious racial gaps in access to school libraries, also related to charter policy and school segregation.

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Hundreds Of Rare Items Still Missing From Carnegie Library « CBS Pittsburgh

Hundreds Of Rare Items Still Missing From Carnegie Library « CBS Pittsburgh | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

OAKLAND (KDKA) — The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s main location in Oakland appears to be the victim of a massive theft crime.

Last April, 314 extremely rare items were discovered to be missing from the rare books room, or the Oliver Room. That room has never been open to the public; it’s available by appointment only. According to the library, scholars and researchers are the types of people who use it.

According to the library, theft happened over an extended period of time in the Oliver Room where some of the items date back as early as 1477.

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No rhyme or reason for noisy kids' activities in library, frustrated patron says | Stuff.co.nz

No rhyme or reason for noisy kids' activities in library, frustrated patron says | Stuff.co.nz | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Korean Rhymetime has run at Takapuna Library and now runs at Glenfield Library.

One person's "bubble of happiness" is another's "ridiculous child-entertainment", as Wriggle and Rhyme pushes a library patron to the point of making a complaint.

The Takapuna Library user, who frequented the Auckland library to study, contacted Stuff concerned about the volume of the "ridiculous child-entertainment music and movement classes" run in the downstairs children's section of the library.

"It becomes very difficult to concentrate on what I am reading and writing because of the noise of these programmes," he said.

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Library Love: Old Books Make Me Feel Fancy!

Library Love: Old Books Make Me Feel Fancy! | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Guys, you would not believe what I discovered when I was mindlessly browsing the stacks at my university library: Really. Old. Books. Not science textbooks from the 1950's old. Not even first edition The Great Gatsby old. I'm talking about books about Hawaii when Hawaii was still called the Sandwich Islands. Did you even know that? I did, but I'm pretty sure I learned that from 1980's cartoons. Anyway, it was like looking at the history of history. My eyes did that thing where the camera simultaneously zooms in and pulls back and it blew my mind! It also made me feel, well, fancy. More academic than usual. That day, I said no to my bookbag full of Judith Butler and Michel Foucault, donned my extra academic nerd gear, and set off on my own historical journey. Here's what I looked like:
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Copyright Librarians and Other Non-Lawyers as Copyright Managers

Copyright Librarians and Other Non-Lawyers as Copyright Managers | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Copyright librarians are often leaders and managers when it comes to copyright compliance in their organizations.This article discusses the role of librarians and other non lawyers who deal with daily copyright issues. They are often called Copyright Librarians, Copyright Officers or Copyright Specialists though their position titles do not always have the word copyright in it. They

Copyright law is complicated. It’s complicated even for lawyers,  and even for copyright lawyers who deal with copyright issues all the time. What makes it particularly challenging is that it’s the kind of law that individuals with no legal backgrounds must understand an apply to their own situations. Think about all of the issues a nonlawyer must deal with in the area of intellectual property, particularly copyright law:

- protecting content they create and distribute (often online)
- negotiating permissions with others to permit the use of their content
- interpreting licenses for the use of online content owned by third parties
- applying fair use to a variety of situations
- understanding exceptions set out in the copyright law
- determining and researching when a work is in the public domain
- teaching others about complying with copyright law
- answering a variety of copyright questions

With the Internet, often all of these non-lawyers must understand international copyright treaties and foreign copyright laws as well as the copyright laws in their own countries – at least on a practical level.

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Academic Librarianship | Professional Media

Academic Librarianship | Professional Media | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Reviews:

1. Academic Library Management: Case Studies. ALA. 2017. 192p. ed. by Tammy Nickelson Dearie & others. i
Fourteen librarians selected to participate in the 2014 UCLA Library Senior Fellows program share their experience, presenting case studies related to academic library management. 

2. Assessing Library Space for Learning. Rowman & Littlefield. 2017. 274p. ed. by Susan E. Montgomery.
Acutely aware that the physical layout of an institution impacts the user experience, Montgomery has compiled germane essays from academic librarians as well as psychologists, architects, and administrators, who examine the role of space on learning in academic libraries. 

3.Oakleaf, Megan. Academic Library Value: The Impact Starter Kit. ALA. 2017. Provides 52 practical exercises to help with the daunting but necessary task of proving an academic library’s worth to stakeholders and administrators

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7 Insidious Myths About Libraries and Reading (the first two kill me)

A list of untruths about libraries and reading that even library lovers believe.
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Do not be silenced. How opinion formers gives the library debate diversity and more voices

Do not be silenced. How opinion formers gives the library debate diversity and more voices | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The Danish Union of Librarians has made a bold and important move, which I want to share with you. But first, let me tell you a story some of you might already know:

President John F. Kennedy was visiting NASA headquarters for the first time, in 1961. While touring the facility, he introduced himself to a janitor who was mopping the floor and asked him what he did at NASA. The janitor replied, “I’m helping put a man on the moon!”

I like this little story because it reminds me that we are all ambassadors for telling the purpose and value of our institutions, from top management to the janitor who mops the floor. However, it is not enough to know the vision and the value of libraries or whatever institutions you are a part of – it is crucial that we also got the skills and the tools to communicate it to the surrounding world. In the daily tsunami of information and a jungle of communication channels, that does not necessary come easy. It takes courage, awareness and a certain skill-set to stand up and communicate a case so people listen and understands your message.

The Danish Union of Librarians has taken responsibility for trying to bridge their members with methods and skills to influence the public debate by establishing an “Education for Opinion Formers” (sorry, no English version of the program available at this time that I can link to).

The Education for Opinion Formers is a three-day course aiming at giving librarians and library workers the skills, tools, insight and courage to participate and interact in the public debate on behalf of libraries. The Opinion Formers will learn to:

Write piece of debate to newspapers and other medias with clear points and language
Get tools to communicate to others from the standpoint at one’s own profession and values
Tell stories so people listen
Grow a network of peers who want to join the voice for libraries
The education is developed in collaboration with the Think Tank Cevea that also facilitates the program.

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It's the library users without gloves I worry about | Ian Anstice | Public Leaders Network | The Guardian

It's the library users without gloves I worry about | Ian Anstice | Public Leaders Network | The Guardian | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Photograph: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images


In this cold weather, public libraries are warm and open to all. The idea of them no longer being here gives me the shivers

Ian Anstice- Librarian- Sat 3 Mar 2018 10.09 GMT Last modified on Sat 3 Mar 2018 

In this cold weather, public libraries are warm and open to all. 
There are a lot more homeless people using libraries these days. They will come in and stay in for hours and hours. Those who are dressed warmly are doing comparatively OK, but I wonder what those without gloves will do after the library closes. I hope they have a homeless shelter or somewhere else warm. We do what we can to help – sometimes we’ll phone the council hotline to try and find somewhere for them to stay. Many are so grateful when something is arranged.

The great thing about libraries is that everyone can sit down and be part of our community. The homeless people that visit us will see families, the young and old and, hopefully, feel part of normal human life. That’s just as important as the books and computers we offer.

Library closures mean lonely people will be left out in the cold.

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An unquiet realization about libraries - CSMonitor.com

An unquiet realization about libraries - CSMonitor.com | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

FEBRUARY 28, 2018 —The irony didn’t dawn immediately. Only on the way home. The book I had just returned to our local library was called “Unquiet Landscape: Places and Ideas in 20th Century English Painting,” by Christopher Neve. He ranged across his subject and widened my view.

But the ironic word for me in his book’s title, I realized, was “unquiet.” It applied not to the landscape but to our local urban library. I have visited again since then, and my conclusion is much the same: This is no longer a quiet place.

On both of my visits the library was packed with small children, and they were doing rather a lot of small-children things, such as dancing in circles, chattering, singing, chanting nursery rhymes, jumping up and down, and so forth. Various adults dotted around were clearly not discouraging them – rather the opposite.

I wasn’t exactly shocked. But I have to say that my perception of library behavior and purpose shifted somewhat.

All my upbringing vis-à-vis libraries was that they were sanctums, monastic in their reverence, silent escape places in a noisy and riotous world. If one so much as cleared one’s throat in a library, one was likely to be subjected to an inundation of purse-lipped librarians dramatically shushing – not to mention the disapproval of fellow library users profoundly enjoying their post-lunch nap (sometimes known as “research”) and now rudely and indignantly awake.


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