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Case studies: How four community information projects went from idea to impact

Case studies: How four community information projects went from idea to impact | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

It’s almost time for our sixth annual Media Learning Seminar, where community and place-based foundations will gather to discuss how to create informed, engaged communities.This year, we’ll give them something new to consider – a case study (download) of how foundations have been able to put together their community information projects.

Why does this matter? Because making positive change in communities requires the free flow of quality news and information. If the news and information environment is in trouble, so is civic life.

 

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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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The New York Public Library Unveils Master Plan for Its Iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building - Archiscene - Your Daily Architecture & Design Update

The New York Public Library Unveils Master Plan for Its Iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building - Archiscene - Your Daily Architecture & Design Update | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library has unveiled a Master Plan for its iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, one of the nation’s leading research libraries, which for over a century has stood as a symbol of open and free access to information and opportunity.
The $317 million plan for the historic Midtown building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street was shared at the Library’s Board of Trustees meeting this evening, and calls for an approximate 20% increase in public space for research, exhibitions, and educational programs.
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5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving

5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving

1.IMLS and LSTA funding is safe for now. 

2. Librarian activists are making a major impact. In addition to advocating for civil liberties and privacy protections, librarians continue to play an active role in preserving and protecting data. 

3. The job market for librarians is looking positive. Library Journal‘s recently released annual Placements and Salaries survey shows full-time librarian salaries are up, as are the number of librarian placements for MLIS students. 

4. People – especially younger generations – are still using libraries..

5. Librarians continue to be wildly creative and funny. 

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New York Public Library's Main Branch to undergo $317mn renovation

New York Public Library's Main Branch to undergo $317mn renovation | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library's Main Branch, known for the two stone lions that guard its imposing entrance, is about to undergo a $317 million renovation. The library, located at 476 Fifth Avenue and popular among tourists, is one of the top research libraries in the US, drawing scholars from across the country, reports Efe news. The renovation of the flagship building, which opened in 1911 and was constructed in the Beaux-Arts architectural style, will not be completed until late 2021. Four years ago, when another renovation project was proposed, a group of scholars threatened to sue the library if it proceeded to remove its century-old book stacks and turn part of the research library into a circulating library. The new renovation project is designed to increase the space available for research, exhibit and study rooms by 20 per cent, as well as adding a coffee house, shop, elevator and terrace. The master plan, however, avoids the touchy issue of the stacks, which were installed in 1911 and do not meet modern preservation standards for temperature, humidity and fire safety
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Five Laws of Library Science

Five Laws of Library Science | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

FIVE LAWS OF LIBRARY SCIENCE ➨ The 5 Laws of Library Science is a theory proposed by S. R. Ranganathan in 1931, detailing the principles of operating a library system. Five laws of library science are called the set of norms, percepts, and guides to good practice in librarianship. Many librarians worldwide accept them as the foundations of their philosophy. Dr. S.R. Ranganathan conceived the Five Laws of Library Science in 1924. The statements embodying these laws were formulated in 1928. These laws were first published in Ranganathan's classic book entitled Five Laws of Library Science in 1931.

These laws are:
Books are for use.
Every reader his / her book.
Every book its reader.
Save the time of the reader.
The library is a growing organism.

These laws of Library Science are the "fundamental laws" of Library Science. These are applicable to any problem in the areas of library science, library service, and library practice. These laws are like pot containing oceans. Prior to their enunciation, the subject of Library Science had no philosophy. These laws gave a philosophical base, guaranteeing an everlasting future to the subject of library science, the profession of librarianship, and the use of libraries. These laws have provided a scientific approach to the subject of library science. Even though S.R. Ranganathan proposed the Five Laws of Library Science before the advent of the digital age, they are still valid and equally relevant today. 

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Salman Haider describes the working of the laws in modern times.
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8 Ways To Make Your Library More Visible Now

8 Ways To Make Your Library More Visible Now | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
When I became a school library media specialist 20 years ago, I had no idea how much time and energy I would devote to promoting my role and media program. As school librarians, our impact isn’t always apparent, and our roles are frequently questioned.
That’s ironic to me because year to year our role evolves more than that of any other faculty member. We must adapt and grow with changes in curriculum, students’ needs, and the expectations of teachers and administrators. What I do in my media program at Brookwood High School (BHS) in Snellville, GA, may be unlike from what happens at the other 20 high schools in my county. Each school offers different courses and electives. Some librarians have additional duties assigned by administrators, and the professional development that we offer varies. Our priorities are student-centered and we strive for their success.
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Mississippi school board pulls 'To Kill a Mockingbird' from reading list

Mississippi school board pulls 'To Kill a Mockingbird' from reading list | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The school board in Biloxi, Mississippi, has pulled "To Kill a Mockingbird" from an eighth-grade reading list after receiving complaints about wording in the book.

Last week, Kenny Holloway, the board's vice president, said there was language in the book that "makes people uncomfortable."

"We can teach the same lesson with other books," Holloway said, according to the The Sun Herald newspaper. "It's still in our library. But they're going to use another book in the eighth-grade course."

The Biloxi School District didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

The book will still be available to check out from the library and is still listed on the school website as part of the eighth-grade English Learning Arts program.

The Sun Herald reported that a reader said the decision stems around the book's use of the n-word. A syllabus posted on the school system's website says questions to focus on include "What does it mean to be racist?" and "What is the difference between tradition and ignorance?"

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, written by the late Harper Lee and published in 1960, centers on racial inequality and injustices in the Deep South. In 2009 and 2011, the American Library Association listed the novel as one of the "Top Ten Most Challenged Books.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Unbelievable. But the book will still be available to check out from the library!!
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Louis L'Amour's Library and Reading List | Art of Manliness

Louis L'Amour's Library and Reading List | Art of Manliness | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Welcome back to our series on the libraries of great men. The eminent men of history were often voracious readers and their own philosophy represents a distillation of all the great works they fed into their minds. This series seeks to trace the stream of their thinking back to the source. For, as David Leach, a now retired business executive put it: “Don’t follow your mentors; follow your mentors’ mentors.”

When digging in to the best novels and authors in the Western genre of literature, there are a few names that pop up over and over again. Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Zane Grey, and of course, Louis L’Amour. Over the course of his prolific career, L’Amour published over 100 books — most of them novels, but also over a dozen short story collections, and one brilliant autobiography, Education of a Wandering Man, which is more of a journal of his prodigious reading rather than a life telling (note: all quotes in this piece are from that book). Amazingly, not a single novel of his was published until 1951 when he was in his early 40s, though he had been writing poems and stories his whole adult life.

Though he’ll rarely be praised for writing beautiful or lyrical prose, L’Amour is one of the top 25 bestselling authors of all time, and when you ask grandpas — yes, as a whole category — about their favorite authors, he seems to almost universally top their lists. L’Amour writes with a realistic quality that isn’t easily matched in the genre, balancing both the romance and realities of Western life. His action scenes are superb, but more striking are his lifelike depictions of the landscape, the horses and horsemanship, the movements and habits of American Indians. Few have ever researched and truly lived the West like L’Amour.
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Talking libraries

Talking libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Leigh Hobbs has been out and about in the media over the past two weeks talking about school libraries and why we still need them. First stop was ABC News Breakfast with Virginia Trioli and Michael Rowland.

Leigh covered topics including what it means to be the Australian Children's Laureate, and most importantly, why we need libraries.


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Melania Trump Tried to Donate Books to a School and Was Rejected by the School Librarian

Melania Trump Tried to Donate Books to a School and Was Rejected by the School Librarian | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

An elementary school librarian in Cambridge, MA wrote a blog post rejecting a collection of Dr. Seuss books donated to the school by the First Lady. For National Read a Book Day, Melania Trump sent out ten Dr. Seuss books to one school in each state.
She seems to have picked a live one with the selection of Cambridgeport Elementary School.


Melania Trump and books have proven to be a volatile combination.
When Melania tweeted in support of National Read a Book Day, the reaction from the Internet was swift and overwhelmingly critical.

Now, the First Lady is in the news again for her National Read a Book Day decisions, this time thanks to a fiery elementary school librarian, Liz Phipps Soeiro. After receiving Melania Trump’s donation of ten Dr. Seuss books for her school, Soerio posted an open letter to the First Lady on the Horn Book’s Family Reading blog, effectively rejecting the books.

“I work in a district that has plenty of resources, which contributes directly to ‘excellence,'” she wrote. “My students have access to a school library with over nine thousand volumes and a librarian with a graduate degree in library science … Meanwhile, school libraries around the country are being shuttered.

“Cities like Philadelphia, Chicago, and Detroit are suffering through expansion, privatization, and school ‘choice’ … Why not go out of your way to gift books to underfunded and underprivileged communities that continue to be marginalized and maligned by policies put in place by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos?”

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Volunteers rescue thousands of books from Mosul library destroyed by Islamic State

Volunteers rescue thousands of books from Mosul library destroyed by Islamic State | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

A volunteer effort to save thousands of books and manuscripts from a Mosul university library destroyed by Islamic State has renewed hope for the city after more than two years of occupation.

Volunteers help carry out books from the Mosul library destroyed by Islamic State. (Credit: ABC licensed) 
It was a reading festival. But this is Mosul, and until a few months ago it was crawling with Islamic State militants.
They occupied the city's university library, where last week festival-goers celebrated a rich culture and donated books.
The volunteer effort to save what was left of Mosul University library after it was destroyed by IS has renewed hope for the city after more than two years of occupation.

The library once contained hundreds of thousands of ancient documents, including a ninth-century Koran, before it was burned down in a deliberate attempt to erase culture.
But Mosul local and amateur photographer Ali ِAl-Baroodi, who once taught at the university, has been part of a community campaign led by independent blogger Mosul Eye to restore what remained of the library's collection.
"At the beginning when we went by the library, we couldn't hold back our tears, and we thought it was all over," Mr Al-Baroodi said.

"We thought nothing survived from inside the library. Then we found that some books have survived and some of them are old manuscripts from 100 to 200 years ago.

"So we could save 86,000 books and removed 36,000 surviving beautiful books to a safer place. It was a big accomplishment."

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The Best Library In Every State

The Best Library In Every State | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

HuffPost is hitting the road this fall to interview people about their hopes, dreams, fears ― and what it means to be American today.
No disrespect to your e-reader or anything, but nothing beats curling up with an actual book. There’s just something about the smell of dusty pages, the crack of a new spine and a bookshelf filled with old favorites. Not to mention how a real book will never run out of batteries. Even better? Get yourself a library card and the cost of a new read is totally free. Here, the best library in every state where you’ll definitely want to get lost in the stacks. 

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Rebecca Solnit on the Treasure of Public Libraries • Rhys Tranter

Rebecca Solnit on the Treasure of Public Libraries •  Rhys Tranter | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

I’ve joked for a long time that if you walked up to people in the street and asked them whether we could own our greatest treasures collectively and trust people to walk away with them and bring them back, a lot of people would say that’s impossibly idealistic and some would say it’s socialist, but libraries have been making books free for all for a very long time. They are temples of books, fountains of narrative pleasure, and toolboxes of crucial information. My own writing has depended on public libraries and then university libraries and archives and does to this day. I last used a public library the day before yesterday.”

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Stavros Niarchos Foundation Gives $55 Million To New York Public Library

Stavros Niarchos Foundation Gives $55 Million To New York Public Library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library's largest circulating branch in midtown Manhattan is receiving $55 million to fund a long-awaited renovation thanks to the Stavros Niarchos Foundation.
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NY Public Library To Attempt $317 Million Renovation - Signature Reads

NY Public Library To Attempt $317 Million Renovation - Signature Reads | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The main branch of the New York Public Library is a historic building and hub of research, and has become a destination for tourists worldwide thanks to cameos in films such as “Ghostbusters” (there have been many literary references as well, such as in James Baldwin’s Go Tell It On the Mountain). Keeping the building serviceable as well as glamorous has proven expensive over the years, but the Library has unveiled a new $317 million renovation plan that will expand its public space by 20%. The previous plan was halted when scholars lamented the loss of central stacks – “seven floors of shelving built with the library in 1911” – which are guaranteed to be preserved in this proposal.
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The Libraries Transform Campaign | SensoryEdge Blog

The Libraries Transform Campaign | SensoryEdge Blog | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Why care about libraries. Hey we can get all we need from a smartphone right? Not exactly.

Because 5 million students can’t access broadband at home
Because collaboration empowers teachers
Because today’s gamer could be tomorrow’s inventor
Because school is a time to think, create, share and grow
Because libraries make leaders
Because ISPS shouldn’t have VIPS’s
Because the internet shouldn’t have a slow lane
Because audiobooks turn commutes into adventures
Because librarians have been helping people fact check since forever
Because 0 and 1 add up to infinite possibilities
Because blue state or red state, everyone benefits from an enlighten state
Because the summer slide isn’t playground equipment
Because the expert in the library is you
Because librarians know information is the best medicine for healthcare questions
Because the best search engine in the library is the librarian
Because librarians get an A+ for ensuring kids excel in reading
Because fake news can have real world consequences
Because access equals opportunity
Because hands on learning builds stronger brains
Because free wi-fi shouldn’t require a receipt
Because a little know how can make a smart phone smarter
Because you might take an interest in Gardening at 3 A.M.
Because a library card is the most important school supply of all
Because students who read during the summer, end up on the honor roll in the Fall
Because learning starts before kindergarten
Because it’s 3 A.M. and you need to read Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
Because txt rfine, but srsly, ppl also need 2 c real sentences
Because 5 out of 5 doctors agree, reading aloud to children supports brain development
Because adding Minecraft to curriculum may inspire more future engineers than mathematics alone
Because learning to read comes before reading to learn
Because there are more than 14,400,000 search results for the 2016 presidential election
Because more than a quarter of U.S. households don’t have a computer with an internet connection
Because why shouldn’t you be able to bring your grande caramel snickerdoodle macchiato?
Because students can’t afford scholarly journals on a ramen noodle budget
Because employers want candidates who know the difference between a web search and research
Because punctuation without imagination makes a sentence, not a story
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'Open the doors and let these books in' - what would a truly diverse reading list look like?

'Open the doors and let these books in' - what would a truly diverse reading list look like? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Following student calls for university English literature syllabuses to be ‘decolonised’, Hanif Kureishi, Arundhati Roy, Kamila Shamsie and other authors reflect on the debate and choose essential books by black and minority ethnic writers
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Against Amazon: Seven Arguments, One Manifesto

Against Amazon: Seven Arguments, One Manifesto | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

AGAINST AMAZON: SEVEN ARGUMENTS, ONE MANIFESTO
"AMAZON APPROPRIATED OUR BOOKS. WE WILL APPROPRIATE AMAZON LOGIC."

November 15, 2017  By Jorge Carrión Share:

I.
Because I don’t want to be an accomplice to symbolic expropriation.

For 55 years that building in Barcelona, one of city’s few examples of modern industrial architecture, was the head office of the publishers Gustavo Gili. Now, after a refurbishment costing several million euros, it has become Amazon’s local center of operations. Thanks to the technology of efficiency and immediacy it houses, Barcelona is now one of the 45 cities in the world where the company guarantees delivery of products in an hour. The Canuda bookshop that shut in 2013 after over 80 years’ of existence is now a gigantic Mango. The Catalònia bookshop, after over a hundred, is now a McDonald’s with a kitsch modernist decor. Expropriation is literal and physical, but also symbolic.

If you enter “Amazon bookshop” on Google, dozens of links appear to Amazon pages that sell bookshelves. As I will never tire of repeating: Amazon is not a bookshop, it is a hypermarket. Its warehouses store books next to toasters, toys or skateboards. In its new physical bookshops books are placed face up, because they only display the 5,000 best-selling books most sought after by their customers, a lot less than the number on the shelves of genuine bookshops that are prepared to take risks. Amazon is now considering whether to repeat the same operation with a chain of small supermarkets. As far as it is concerned there is no difference between a cultural institution and an establishment that sells food and other goods.

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee taken off Mississippi school reading list

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee taken off Mississippi school reading list | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee’s classic novel about racism and the American south, has been removed from a junior-high reading list in a Mississippi school district because the language in the book “makes people uncomfortable”.

Why Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird endures to tell its tale of radical change
The Sun Herald reported that administrators in Biloxi pulled the novel from the eighth-grade curriculum this week.

Kenny Holloway, vice-president of the Biloxi school board, told the newspaper: “There were complaints about it. There is some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable, and we can teach the same lesson with other books. It’s still in our library. But they’re going to use another book in the eighth-grade course.”

A message on the Biloxi schools website said To Kill a Mockingbird teaches students that compassion and empathy do not depend upon race or education.

Published in 1960, Lee’s Pulitzer-winning novel deals with racial inequality in a small Alabama town, in the aftermath of an alleged rape of a white woman for which a black man is tried. It has sold more than 40m copies and it was made into a film in 1962, winning three Oscars.

An email to the Sun Herald from a concerned reader referred to the book’s use of the word “nigger” when it said the school board’s decision was made “mid-lesson plan”.

“The students will not be allowed to finish the reading of To Kill a Mockingbird,” the email said “… due to the use of the ‘N’ word.”

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bookofjoe: Library Sound Archives

bookofjoe: Library Sound Archives | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The incredible record libraries where you can listen to vast archives for free — the way we like it.
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Melissa Jacobs Takes Top Library Position at NYC Department of Education

Melissa Jacobs Takes Top Library Position at NYC Department of Education | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Attracting more educators into the library profession, expanding maker spaces in schools, and creating more opportunities for librarians in public and nonpublic schools to learn from one another are among Melissa Jacobs’s priorities as the New York City Department of Education’s (NYCDOE) new director of library services.

Named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker in 2015, Jacobs has led a variety of efforts designed to encourage librarians to take leadership roles in their schools and in national organizations. .
Sue Kowalski, a librarian in the East Syracuse Minoa School District, calls Jacobs a “human connector.”

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Chris Selley: Libraries feel the heat on freedom of speech

Chris Selley: Libraries feel the heat on freedom of speech | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The Canadian Federation of Library Associations’ position paper on intellectual freedom clearly lays out libraries’ “core responsibilities” in that regard. One is “to safeguard and facilitate access to constitutionally protected expressions of knowledge, imagination, ideas, and opinion, including those which some individuals and groups consider unconventional, unpopular or unacceptable.” Another is to “make available their public spaces and services to individuals and groups without discrimination.”

In an era when free speech scrambles for purchase on university campuses, one wonders how long it will last in libraries. In June, Toronto’s excellent public library system came under heavy fire for a paid room-booking that turned out to be a memorial event for Barbara Kulaszka, a lawyer best known for representing alleged Nazi war criminals in Canada and their supporters, notably Ernst Zundel.
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Public library hosts second Black Ink book festival

Public library hosts second Black Ink book festival | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The second Black Ink book festival, slated for 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23, at the main branch of the Charleston County Public Library, features keynote speaker Kwame Alexander and 50 other authors, most from the Charleston area.

The mission of “Black Ink: A Charleston African American Book Festival” is to support local black writers by “creating a space for them to share their work, discuss their craft and expose readers all ages to the great variety of African American authors in the area.” Though organizers say the festival has much to offer people of all ages and races.

Admission is free and includes author exhibits, featured author sessions, workshops and seminars and entertainment. A full schedule is available at CharlestonLibraryFriends.org.

Alexander won the Newberry Award in 2015 for his book of poetry, “The Crossover,” the story of a young basketball player. He is scheduled to speak at 2 p.m. Saturday.

Other authors include Bernard Powers and Herb Frazier who co-wrote, along with Marjory Wentworth, “We Are Charleston,” an examination of the Emanuel AME Church shooting set in the context of Charleston history, as well as authors of romance, young adult fiction, children's literature and more.

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Why you're probably reading the wrong books — and missing the point

Why you're probably reading the wrong books — and missing the point | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
If we limit our reading to books by writers who resemble ourselves, aren't we missing the point, asks Nicola Heath.
Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Check it and correct if if so. Libraries need to check on bias too.
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Rebecca Solnit on a Childhood of Reading and Wandering

Rebecca Solnit on a Childhood of Reading and Wandering | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

.The United States’s public libraries sometimes seem to me the last refuges of a democratic vision of equality, places in which everyone is welcome, which serve the goal of an informed public, offering services far beyond the already heady gift of free books you can take home, everything from voter registration to computer access. I’ve joked for a long time that if you walked up to people in the street and asked them whether we could own our greatest treasures collectively and trust people to walk away with them and bring them back, a lot of people would say that’s impossibly idealistic and some would say it’s socialist, but libraries have been making books free for all for a very long time. They are temples of books, fountains of narrative pleasure, and toolboxes of crucial information. My own writing has depended on public libraries and then university libraries and archives and does to this day. I last used a public library the day before yesterday

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New York Public Library Receives $55 Million Gift to Renovate Mid-Manhattan Library, 2nd Largest Gift in History of NYPL

New York Public Library Receives $55 Million Gift to Renovate Mid-Manhattan Library, 2nd Largest Gift in History of NYPL | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The Foundation’s transformational $55 million gift will support the creation of a modern, central branch to hold the Library’s largest circulating collection and offer countless programs for children, teens, and adults. In addition, it will help establish an inspiring “Midtown campus” that will reconnect the circulating library with the Library’s iconic research center, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, across Fifth Avenue.
The gift also establishes an endowment for programming at the renovated library.
The Mid-Manhattan Library renovation is expected to be complete in 2020, when the building will reopen as The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL).
In total, the Foundation has supported the Library with grants of over $60 million. The Library’s Board of Trustees Executive Committee approved the renaming at a recent meeting, and it was announced at the full Board of Trustees meeting this evening.
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