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All change for library services

All change for library services | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Flagship libraries open in big cities across England as smaller branches close or are taken over by volunteers...
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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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Iterative and incremental evaluation of what we do in libraries. Movie. –

Iterative and incremental evaluation of what we do in libraries. Movie. – | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Do Australian academic libraries evaluate their learning projects often, in different ways and then act on it?

Today, 14 February 2018, I am presenting at a paper on the topic that I co-wrote with Karen Miller in Melbourne,  at the VALA2018 Libraries, Technology and the Future conference.

If you can’t be in the session, then you may like to watch the movie I made during one of the run-throughs with my slides: Incremental and iterative evaluation of student learning projects in academic libraries

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How Being a Librarian Makes Me a Better Writer

How Being a Librarian Makes Me a Better Writer | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Every year, thousands of hospital patients die due to bloodstream infections introduced by the very central venous catheters that were inserted to help keep them alive. Central venous catheters are the rubber tubes attached to chests or necks that feed medicine and nutrition to critical patients, the floppy boughs between human and machine that telegraph the gravity of a character’s illness in medical dramas. The ports through which the catheters attach to the human body are also perfect little hell-mouths for infection, welcoming in, like baby birds, anything—sustenance or contagion—dropped in for them to feed on, often by medical personnel who didn’t make it through two rounds of the Happy Birthday song when washing their hands after their Panera breaks.

I know this not because I’m an epidemiologist but because I’m an academic librarian, and many of my patrons are panicked nursing students working on the capstone papers standing between them and the career that will immediately land them in a higher tax bracket than me upon graduation. I’m also a fiction writer, which is why I’m as interested in the human fallibility that those central venous catheter infections represent as I am on prevention strategies.
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Tale of 2 polls: What do librarians have that journalists don’t?

Tale of 2 polls: What do librarians have that journalists don’t? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Tale of 2 polls: What do librarians have that journalists don’t?
BY DAVID BEARD · JANUARY 19, 2018

America’s journalists, relentlessly attacked by President Trump, are also taking a beating in public opinion. However, their information-gathering cousins, librarians, are riding a cloud of popularity.

Is there something journalists can learn from librarians?
The Knight Foundation and Gallup gave the latest bad news to journalists on Wednesday, weighing in a mammoth poll showing only 33 percent of Americans have a positive view of the news media. Of 18- to 29-year-olds polled, only 22 percent trust the media.

By huge majorities, Americans see major problems with:
Owners of news outlets attempting to influence the ways stories are reported.
News organizations being too dramatic or too sensational in order to attract more readers or viewers.
Too much bias in the reporting of news stories that are supposed to be objective (only 44 percent can think of a news source that they believe reports the news objectively).

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We have plundered the commons

We have plundered the commons | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Eight hundred years ago, on November 6, 1217, a ten-year-old king, Henry III, watched as his Regent set his seal (he was too young to have one of his own) to a document that was to become a foundation of the British and later the US constitutions, as well as those of other countries. Alongside what became that day the Magna Carta, it was called the Charter of the Forest. Often called the world’s first environmental charter, seeking to balance the need to preserve natural resources with human needs, it was remarkable for reversing 150 years of enclosure of land, returning it to the commons. It was also the first time that the state recognised that all free men had a right to subsistence and the right to make a home in the commons. It also marked a first modest advance for feminism, granting widows the right to refuse to be remarried and a right to subsistence – the right to ‘reasonable estovars’ (necessities) in the commons. The Charter had another distinction, of staying on the statute books for longer than any other piece of legislation, 754 years. Yet while all schoolchildren are taught about the Magna Carta, few hear of the Charter. It is not hard to explain why. From forests to city squares, parks to libraries, our common spaces are under attack, writes Guy Standing. 

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10 of the world’s unique mobile bookshops and libraries

10 of the world’s unique mobile bookshops and libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Books change our lives, expand our horizons, and make us better persons, but it’s not just the authors we have to thank, but also those who facilitate our access to them and instill in us the joy of reading. That’s why we’ve rounded up a list of some of the most ingenious nomadic bookshops and libraries from across the globe.


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The Kindle Changed the Book Business. Can It Change Books?

The Kindle Changed the Book Business. Can It Change Books? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

IN 2007, A small team of Amazon employees had been working for a few years on a new ebook reader project they'd eventually call the Kindle. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos was eager to finish and sell the thing; he was certain Apple or Google was working on something similar, and didn't want them to beat Amazon to market. The team, sequestered away in an old law office in Seattle, working among racks of the very books they planned to make obsolete, had already gotten a lot of things right. But one part still eluded them.

At the very beginning, the Kindle's creators wrote a press release about the device. This is standard practice at Amazon: It's meant to ground everything in the ultimate result, to begin with the end in mind and then work backwards. The Kindle's founding documents mentioned that customers would get new content by connecting their device to their PC, and syncing it like an iPod. So that's what they built. But the vision quickly felt too small. "You want to be able to be on a tarmac, think of a book, and get a book in 60 seconds," says Steve Kessel, one of the early leaders of the project.


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People Are Checking Out 'Fire and Fury' From Libraries as Fast as Harry Potter

People Are Checking Out 'Fire and Fury' From Libraries as Fast as Harry Potter | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The enormous demand for author Michael Wolff’s exposé on President Trump’s White House, “Fire and Fury,” has created a scramble for copies as online and physical retailers struggle to supply their customers. The crowded market has led some antsy readers to look in their local libraries instead, but they won’t find much luck there either at the moment.

The New York Public Library, the second-largest public library system in the U.S. behind only the Library of Congress, had 1,174 holds (and rising) on 49 copies of the #1 Amazon best seller, NYPL spokeswoman Ayofemi Kirby told TIME. She said that the library has a two-week checkout period for new books, meaning it will take weeks — maybe months — for patrons to get their hands on “Fire and Fury.” In response, the library ordered 450 more rush copies, Kirby said.

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Top libraries for students in HCM City - News VietNamNet

Top libraries for students in HCM City - News VietNamNet | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Top libraries for students in HCM City
In Ho Chi Minh City, there are numerous libraries providing extra-curricular learning space for students in need of a tranquil venue for study in groups or self-study on the weekend.

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Brattleboro library to host program on contributing to Wikipedia

Brattleboro library to host program on contributing to Wikipedia | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Ever start research with Wikipedia? Learn to contribute the footnotes and references which increase the reliability and accuracy of Wikipedia articles.

Wikipedia’s strength is in the references that support it. Librarians, researchers and information seekers can help improve Wikipedia and make it a better resource for everyone. The annual #1lib1ref campaign (1lib1ref.org) asks every librarian and information seeker to add a reference to Wikipedia, to help ensure that Wikipedia’s information is backed by reliable research.

Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St in Brattleboro, will host a #1lib1ref session, for librarians and information seekers alike. The hashtag #1lib1Ref was a Wikipedia publicity drive that asked librarians to mark the 15th anniversary of the foundation in 2016. Particiants can learn how to add a reference to Wikipedia and discuss the role of Wikipedia in research on Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

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Library Launches “Meet the Author” Series | La Feria News

Library Launches “Meet the Author” Series | La Feria News | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
La Feria’s Bailey H Dunlap Memorial Library is launching an ambitious book-signing series to help promote literacy for our citizens. The program is called “Meet the Author” and features monthly book-signing events with the writers present at the library. This gives people the opportunity to have their personal copy of the book signed by the author themselves. It will be quite a nice program.

The first author in the series was Katelynn Renteria, who signed many copies of her award-winning book, “The Other Side of the Law” for local readers who wanted to meet this young lady author and have her sign their book. The author was gracious and took time to talk with admirers after signing.

Katelynn Renteria is a native of the Rio Grande Valley, and at the age of 15 is already a published author in great demand and an Award winner of the 2017 Silver Literacy Classics Award.
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The Librarian Action Figure is the Hero We Need

The Librarian Action Figure is the Hero We Need | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Who's the real hero in your life? The one who has what you need, who opens up new worlds to you, and who encourages your kids to be the best they can be? Who fights against ignorance and illiteracy every day? Your librarian! And now she's clad in a superhero cape, is she should be. This Librarian Action Figure is based on real librarian Nancy Pearl of the Seattle Public Library. That's some honor. The action figure was first developed in 2003 for Archie McPhee, and had a button you pushed to raise her hand to "shh!" you, but that's apparently been dropped for the newer version. -via Madam Jujujive

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This teacher couple own and maintain one of India's largest private libraries

This teacher couple own and maintain one of India's largest private libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

We live in a digital era where gaining access to books or information is just a few clicks away. It wasn’t the case 50 years ago when people had to travel long and far for the same. It was at that time that Krishnamurthy started his library - Gnanalaya - with just hundred books.

Though Gnanalaya was started in 1959, it did not belong to any one city or district. Krishnamurthy, a government school teacher, took his collection of books wherever he got a transfer of job. It was only after his retirement that he decided to settle down in Pudhukottai, Tamil Nadu.

Interestingly, it was love for books that united Dorothy and Krishnamurthy and now the couple own and maintain Gnanalaya - Tamil Nadu's second largest and one of India's largest private libraries. Talking about the reason behind his fascination with books, he said,

My father was passionate about reading and he read a lot. My obsession with books was inspired by him and I started the library in 1959 with 100 books.

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3 Reasons to Celebrate World Read Aloud Day | Knowledge Quest

3 Reasons to Celebrate World Read Aloud Day | Knowledge Quest | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
World Read Aloud Day is an annual event where people all over the world read aloud as a way to advocate for literacy. This event is run by a nonprofit organization called LitWorld. Their mission is to provide reading and writing opportunities to young children around the world.  This year World Read Aloud Day takes place on February1. Below are three reasons why and how we celebrate.
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The Art of Unpacking a Library

The Art of Unpacking a Library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

By Alberto Manguel February 1, 2018 ARTS & CULTURE

THE HOME LIBRARY OF WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST.

I would argue that public libraries, holding both virtual and material texts, are an essential instrument to counter loneliness. I would defend their place as society’s memory and experience. I would say that without public libraries, and without a conscious understanding of their role, a society of the written word is doomed to oblivion. I realize how petty, how egotistical it seems, this longing to own the books I borrow. I believe that theft is reprehensible, and yet countless times I’ve had to dredge up all the moral stamina I could find not to pocket a desired volume. Polonius echoed my thoughts precisely when he told his son, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be.” My own library carried this reminder clearly posted.

I love public libraries, and they are the first places I visit whenever I’m in a city I don’t know. But I can work happily only in my own private library, with my own books—or, rather, with the books I know to be mine. Maybe there’s a certain ancient fidelity in this, a sort of curmudgeonly domesticity, a more conservative trait in my nature than my anarchic youth would have ever admitted. My library was my tortoise shell. 

Sometime in 1931, Walter Benjamin wrote a short and now famous essay about readers’ relationship to their books. He called it “Unpacking My Library: A Speech on Collecting,” and he used the occasion of pulling his almost two thousand books out of their boxes to muse on the privileges and responsibilities of a reader. Benjamin was moving from the house he had shared with his wife until their acrimonious divorce the previous year to a small furnished apartment in which he would live alone, he said, for the first time in his life, “like an adult.” Benjamin was then “at the threshold of forty and without property, position, home or assets.” It might not be entirely mistaken to see his meditation on books as a counterpoise to the breakup of his marriage.

Packing and unpacking are two sides of the same impulse, and both lend meaning to moments of chaos. “Thus is the existence of the collector,” Benjamin writes, “dialectically pulled between the poles of disorder and order.” He might have added: or packing and unpacking.

Unpacking, as Benjamin realized, is essentially an expansive and untidy activity. Freed from their bounds, the books spill onto the floor or pile up in unsteady columns, waiting for the places that will later be assigned to them. In this waiting period, before the new order has been established, they exist in a tangle of synchronicities and remembrances, forming sudden and unexpected alliances or parting from each other incongruously. Lifelong enemies Gabriel García Márquez and Mario Vargas Llosa, for instance, will sit amicably on the same expectant shelf while the many members of the Bloomsbury group will find themselves each exiled to a different “negatively charged region” (as the physicists call it), waiting for the wishful reunion of their particles.

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(82) Fingal Libraries - Startpagina

(82) Fingal Libraries - Startpagina | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

How fantastic do our Mobile Libraries look? We have one more event left today to celebrate their launch. Join us at 4pm for ‘Stories from Around the World’ with Róisín Murphy �

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Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence

Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence https://the-digital-reader.com/2018/01/04/infographic-almost-every-western-literary-movement-history-literature-summed-single-sentence.

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The Library Lifecycle - NEA Today

The Library Lifecycle - NEA Today | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
From young children at story hour to retirees learning second career job skills, the library “ecosystem” serves the needs of our community members throughout their lives. NEA Today spoke with John Chrastka, Executive Director of EveryLibrary — the only national organization dedicated to building voter support for libraries by promoting public, school, and college libraries — to talk the ecosystem about school and public library partnerships.

What is the library “ecosystem” and how do the parts work together?

John Chrastka: The ecosystem includes different ages and stages of people using public, school, and university and college libraries. It has no beginning or end. In Pre-K, public libraries play with parents and care givers as a place for stories and music and movement as well as play. The children’s librarian at a public library is one of the first educators for our children. As children enter elementary school, the school library along with the public library supports children learning to read and reading to learn. The wraparound of literacy support continues throughout the school year and break time
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Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves – In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves – In the Library with the Lead Pipe | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Vocational awe describes the set of ideas, values, and assumptions librarians have about themselves and the profession that result in notions that libraries as institutions are inherently good, sacred notions, and therefore beyond critique. I argue that the concept of vocational awe directly correlates to problems within librarianship like burnout and low salary. This article aims to describe the phenomenon and its effects on library philosophies and practices so that they may be recognized and deconstructed.

by Fobazi Ettarh

Author’s note: I use “librarians” here very broadly. I am not limiting the term to those who have the MLIS because vocational awe affects those who work in libraries at every level. I would argue that it often affects staff more than it does librarians due to the sociodemographics of people in staff level positions as well as the job precarity that many staff positions hold.

Introduction
On June 1st, Mike Newell wrote about Chera Kowalski and other librarians administering the anti-overdose drug Naloxone (more commonly known as Narcan) to patrons in and around McPherson Square Branch in Philadelphia.1 The article went viral and was shared sixteen thousand times. Since then, Kowalski has saved dozens more lives through the administration of Naloxone. More libraries have since followed Philadelphia’s lead in Narcan training. Senator Patrick Maloney of New York introduced the Life-saving Librarians Act2 giving the Secretary of Health and Human Services the authority to award grants for Naloxone rescue kits in public libraries. To Senator Malone, and many librarians, training librarians to be literal life-savers makes sense because it serves the needs of patrons in our communities, and society as a whole. In addition to this core value of service, democracy is another value many believe libraries bring to society. Hillary Clinton, at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, commended Kowalski’s work and also stated, “…You are guardians of the First Amendment and the freedom to read and to speak. The work you do is at the heart of an open, inclusive, diverse society [and] I believe that libraries and democracy go hand in hand.”3
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American reams: why a ‘paperless world’ still hasn’t happened

American reams: why a ‘paperless world’ still hasn’t happened | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

ld Mohawk paper company lore has it that in 1946, a salesman named George Morrison handed his client in Boston a trial grade of paper so lush and even, so uniform and pure, that the client could only reply: “George, this is one super fine sheet of paper.” And thus Mohawk Superfine was born.

This premium paper has been a darling of the printing and design world ever since. “Superfine is to paper what Tiffany’s is to diamonds,” Jessica Helfand, co-founder of Design Observer magazine once said. “If that sounds elitist, then so be it. It is perfect in every way.

Mohawk tells the Superfine origin story every chance it gets: on their website, in press releases, in promotional videos and in their own lush magazine, Mohawk Maker Quarterly. And now Ted O’Connor, Mohawk’s senior vice president and general manager of envelope and converting, is telling it again. He sits on an ottoman in a hotel suite on the 24th floor of what a plaque outside declares is “The Tallest Building in the World with an All-Concrete Structure”. It’s day one, hour zero of Paper2017 in Chicago, the annual three-day event at which the industry, its suppliers and its clients come together to network and engage in “timely sessions on emerging issues”. Attendees are rolling in and registering, and the Mohawk team is killing time before wall-to-wall meetings.

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Must-see objects at the Bodleian Treasures

Must-see objects at the Bodleian Treasures | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
This exhibition contains 21 pairs of carefully selected items. Most of these are manuscripts, but there are also a few other objects; together, they feature some of the Bodleian Libraries’ best collections.
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Literature Links: National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature - TPS-Barat Primary Source Nexus

Literature Links: National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature - TPS-Barat Primary Source Nexus | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The Library of Congress, the Children’s Book Council and Every Child a Reader today announced the appointment of Jacqueline Woodson, four-time Newbery Honor Medalist, Coretta Scott King Book Award winner and former Young People’s Poet Laureate for her memoir-in-verse “Brown Girl Dreaming,” as National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature.

The program was established by the three organizations in 2008 to emphasize the importance of young people’s literature as it relates to lifelong literacy, education and the development and betterment of the lives of young people.
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A Fragile Biblical Text Gets a Virtual Read

A Fragile Biblical Text Gets a Virtual Read | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

In a basement laboratory of the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, an X-ray scanner is pumping invisible beams into a clump of charred parchment leaves that looks as delicate as a long dead flower.

The leaves are the remains of a severely scorched early book, or codex, which was written in southern Egypt some time between 400 and 600 A.D. It contains the Acts of the Apostles, one of the books of the New Testament, possibly bound with another work. The writing is Coptic, the language of Egypt before the Arab conquest in 642 A.D.

The charred codex was purchased by the Morgan Library in 1962. But no one has opened it for fear of destroying it: The brittle pages have been fused together by a cinder that sank through much of the book, congealing the parchment fibers. Unlike famous codices that have their own names, like the Codex Sinaiticus, this one is known humbly as M.910, its accession number at the library.

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The Library of Things | American Libraries Magazine

The Library of Things | American Libraries Magazine | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The Library of Things
More than ever, libraries are offering nontraditional items for checkout.

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Essay on Library of Congress's Twitter archive

Essay on Library of Congress's Twitter archive | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The Library of Congress has the reputation of holding a copy of every book ever published, or at least every book published in the United States -- a reputation that is invalid, however, and that persists in spite of the institution’s efforts to correct it. The collection is huge, a bibliomane's utopia, but it has never claimed to be exhaustive. Indiscriminate accumulation is a sign of hoarding, not of librarianship.

But an exception was made over the past seven years as the LC tried to create a repository of every public posting to Twitter. That experiment is now over. Henceforth, according to a white paper issued in late December, the library will “acquire tweets but will do so on a very selective basis,” in accord with its wider digital-collections policy. A lot goes unsaid in the document, which is perhaps best understood as a sign that the LC is finally getting its bearings again after a long period of erratic leadership.

As noted in this column a few weeks after the project was announced in April 2010, Twitter's initial gift to the library was a complete set of public posts from the social media platform's first four years -- some 21 billion tweets. (Private messages between users were not included.) Going forward, the collection would be supplemented by new batches of tweets that could be made available to library patrons at least six months after they had been tweeted. At that stage about 30 million users had Twitter accounts and produced an average of 50 million new tweets per day. Both figures have increased tenfold since then. And while there is no way to know how many human beings are actually behind the accounts, or how much of the content is computer generated, Twitter itself has grown so ubiquitous as to be a factor in the lives even of people who never use it. We will remember 2017 as the year when a Twitter message leading to war began to seem like a matter of time.
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Walker: The value of a library card

Walker: The value of a library card | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Sometimes people do not know the value of having a library card. Whether you live in Fremont city limits and get a free library card, or if you are a non-resident and pay $35 a year for a card, you have access to the same wonderful resources. Too often I hear that community members are not aware of what resources we provide or why they should have a library card. I wanted to take a minute to go over a few of the benefits of having a library card.

Our biggest value to our patrons is the ability to checkout and read whatever print books they want. They can read Adult Fiction, Large Type books, Young Adult, Children’s, Non-fiction, Spanish, and magazines. We keep classics, New York Times’ Best Sellers, self-help, and instructional. If we don’t have these materials in our library, we can always Interlibrary Loan materials from libraries all across the country. We are encouraging patrons to request books and we are purchasing those items as part of our patron-driven acquisitions mode
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