Librarysoul
4.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Trudy Raymakers from Content Curation World
onto Librarysoul
Scoop.it!

The Discoverability Problem: How To Get Out of the Filter Bubble Recommendation Systems?

The Discoverability Problem: How To Get Out of the Filter Bubble Recommendation Systems? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it


Robin Good: Brett Sandusky attacks the "discovery" topic with simple, straight logic, analyzing what all the new startups and the new tech fanatics seem to systematically look over.

 

How can you help me discover new stuff, if you are intentionally limiting your exploratory gathering to algorithms and to, however varied, network of contacts?

 

She writes: "The discoverability problem in books is a challenge. It’s about connecting users to new and interesting titles, that they wouldn’t normally have seen. This last part bears repeating: …that they wouldn’t normally have seen.

 

Ultimately, the problem with all these discoverability sites is this: their algorithms (if they are even using an algorithm) are based on aggregate data in a one size fits all model.


The more people who read something, the more often it shows up in your recommendations. But, that’s not discoverability. That’s the NYT bestseller list. That’s Nielsen Bookscan telling you the top sales of the week.


Just because most of my friends are reading bestsellers (because, duh, whose aren’t? In fact, that seems to just reinforce the concept of the term “bestseller”) does that mean I should only be shown these titles?

 

Obviously, the answer is no. But, how do we get there?"

 

The answer is that we need a) more expert and qualified human intervention to unearth and pick new stuff, and b) behavioral data coupled with data collected on customer preference to allows us to connect those selected materials to the users in the system.

 

 

Rightful. Timely. 8/10

 

Find out: http://www.brettsandusky.com/2012/10/05/discover-me/

 

(Image credit: Josephine Wall - Discovery)

 

 


Via Robin Good
more...
Robin Good's comment, October 14, 2012 3:56 AM
Too bad that it is only in Russian, as I can't make much sense of whether there is real value in there or not. Or is it there a western language edition?
RPattinson-Daily's comment, October 14, 2012 8:20 AM
Robin Good, thank You for attention to my comment. Unfortunately, due to crisis of 2008 plans of creation its western language edition were terminated. However, concept, technologies, business model of such recommendation service for creative goods (books, movies, music) were described in book “The Economics of Symbolic Exchange” by Alexander Dolgin (2006) (http://www.amazon.com/Economics-Symbolic-Exchange-Alexander-Dolgin/dp/354079882X). I was content curator, market researcher and editor of this book.
It can be read by parts/chapters depending on interest (see its Contents in Amazon). For example, chapter 1.3 about consumer navigation in creative industry such as online music market, ch.2.7 – survey of recommender systems. The music industry was first where recommendation systems based on collaborative filtering were implemented (for example Last.Fm, and many others). How well they are working you may check out for music – Last.Fm (www.last.fm), for movies – Netflix (www.netflix.com).
Robin Good's comment, October 14, 2012 9:12 AM
Thank you for clarifying this and having provided these useful references.
Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Net Neutrality at the end of 2017: What libraries need to know. - District Dispatch

Net Neutrality at the end of 2017: What libraries need to know. - District Dispatch | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Millions of internet users have weighed in — including hundreds of libraries and information professionals — to tell FCC Chairman Ajit Pai not to roll back 2015’s Net Neutrality Order. So what happens now? Flying in the face of this widespread and deep public support for strong net neutrality rules, the FCC has signaled it will gut these protections. Here’s what we expect in coming weeks and months:
FCC Vote: The FCC is expected to be voting at their December meeting, set for December 14 on the adoption of the “Restoring Internet Freedom” rule. The draft language for the vote is expected to be released later today. There likely will be a vote of 3 to 2 (along party lines) to reverse Title II reclassification of the internet. The final order is expected to fully reverse the FCC’s 2015 order.
Release of the Order: The full text of the adopted FCC order will almost certainly not be ready the day of the vote. In 2010, the text of the order (which was subsequently overturned by a federal court) was released two days after it was voted on, and in 2015, the full text was released 14 days after the vote.
Publication in the Federal Register: The order must then be published in the Federal Register and will not go into effect until at least 30 days after publication. This is an important date for proponents of strong net neutrality rules, as this is when appeals to the new order can begin.
Legal challenge: There are 60 days to petition for review or appeal the order in the federal court of appeals.
Another front of activity also could play out in Congress. At this point, there are no concrete proposals circulating, and discussion has come mostly from Republican members, with their Democratic colleagues opposed to legislating at this time. Discussions about legislation are likely to ramp up once the FCC’s vote happens.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Carl Sagan on the Power of Books and Reading as the Path to Democracy

Carl Sagan on the Power of Books and Reading as the Path to Democracy | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Someone reading a book is a sign of order in the world,” wrote the poet Mary Ruefle. Four centuries earlier, while ushering in a new world order, Galileo contemplated how books give us superhuman powers — a sentiment his twentieth-century counterpart, Carl Sagan (November 9, 1934–December 20, 1996), echoed in his shimmering assertion that “a book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.”

Shortly before his death, Sagan expounded on this passionate conviction in an essay titled “The Path to Freedom,” co-written with Ann Druyan — creative director of the Golden Record project and the love of Sagan’s life. It was published in The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (public library) — the indispensable volume that gave us Sagan on moving beyond us vs. them, science as a tool of democracy, and his increasingly needed Baloney Detection Kit for critical thinking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Curator, Manuscripts, Archives & Rare Books. Full-Time job New York, New York

Job Description

• Department: SCM Schomburg Manuscripts, Archives & Rare Books
• Job location: Manhattan, New York
• Job type: Full-Time Regular
• Job ID: 9985

Curator, Manuscripts, Archives & Rare Book

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Job description of a curator - responsibilities, qualifications needed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Library of Congress Card Catalog

Library of Congress Card Catalog | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

For decades, an elegant card catalog occupied a central spot in the Library of Congress Main Reading Room. Before computerization, it was as central to the research process as a search engine in the present day.

When the Main Reading Room was closed for renovation in 1987 the Library returned the room to its original form with desks in a full circle. This meant moving the card catalog to desks adjacent to the Main Reading Room on the first floor of the Jefferson Building. No cards have been added since 1980, but the catalog is still used by researchers and librarians.

The Library of Congress card catalog system dates back to 1898. By 1901 the LC Card Division was producing vast quantities of them for sale to libraries across the country. Every book in the collection had a standardized card listing, relevant metadata, and cross-referenced topics.

There’s something undeniably interesting about perusing the rows of cards, taking in the subtle variations in typography and handwriting on each one. The cards are pleasantly tactile, and the paper has the faint smell of old book. It’s the same physical power that keep some book lovers from ever making the switch from hardcover to ebook, convenience be damned. The Main Reading Room is open to the public twice a year for an open house. Adults visitors often venture in to the catalog area and breathe in deeply as they remember the smell of the library they grew up with.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

London’s most beautiful libraries

London’s most beautiful libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

London is full of libraries. Big libraries, tiny libraries and aesthetically-pleasing libraries, all bursting with books to borrow and read. From historic lending archives that have been used by academics for centuries to modern and symmetrical celebrations of the written word, these beautiful London libraries are worth shouting about. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the graveyard of rare books, also known as the Saulat Public Library, Rampur

Welcome to the graveyard of rare books, also known as the Saulat Public Library, Rampur | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

I have spent much of the past week digging through piles of books at the Saulat Public Library in the city of Rampur in Uttar Pradesh. I am looking for a single manuscript: Muhammad Sanaʾullah Panipati’s Khawass-i Hizb al-Bahr, an 18th century Persian commentary, written in Delhi, on the occult properties of a famous prayer formulae compiled by Abu al-Hasan al-Shadhili, the Maghribi mystic of the 13th century. It is, very likely, the only copy of the commentary in the world.

I know it is somewhere in the library because it appears in Abid Reza Bedar’s 1966 catalogue, but despite my excavations and those of Mazhar Muin Khan, the endlessly patient librarian, the manuscript remains hidden.

I am sure that Muhammad Sanaʾullah Panipati would have understood my search: just as words have occult sympathies with the material world, so too does this hidden manuscript exercise its power, drawing me to the library day after day although it remains unseen, buried beneath thick layers of dust, cobwebs and mouldering pages. As I dig through the stacks, I can’t help but call to mind the hadith qudsi: “I was a hidden treasure that loved to be known.”The disappearance of a single manuscript, though serious in itself, is part of a far larger problem at Saulat Library: one of India’s richest archives of Urdu, Persian and Arabic works, it has fallen into a state of absolute desuetude.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

NY Public Library To Attempt $317 Million Renovation - Signature Reads

NY Public Library To Attempt $317 Million Renovation - Signature Reads | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The main branch of the New York Public Library is a historic building and hub of research, and has become a destination for tourists worldwide thanks to cameos in films such as “Ghostbusters” (there have been many literary references as well, such as in James Baldwin’s Go Tell It On the Mountain). Keeping the building serviceable as well as glamorous has proven expensive over the years, but the Library has unveiled a new $317 million renovation plan that will expand its public space by 20%. The previous plan was halted when scholars lamented the loss of central stacks – “seven floors of shelving built with the library in 1911” – which are guaranteed to be preserved in this proposal.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

The Libraries Transform Campaign | SensoryEdge Blog

The Libraries Transform Campaign | SensoryEdge Blog | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Why care about libraries. Hey we can get all we need from a smartphone right? Not exactly.

Because 5 million students can’t access broadband at home
Because collaboration empowers teachers
Because today’s gamer could be tomorrow’s inventor
Because school is a time to think, create, share and grow
Because libraries make leaders
Because ISPS shouldn’t have VIPS’s
Because the internet shouldn’t have a slow lane
Because audiobooks turn commutes into adventures
Because librarians have been helping people fact check since forever
Because 0 and 1 add up to infinite possibilities
Because blue state or red state, everyone benefits from an enlighten state
Because the summer slide isn’t playground equipment
Because the expert in the library is you
Because librarians know information is the best medicine for healthcare questions
Because the best search engine in the library is the librarian
Because librarians get an A+ for ensuring kids excel in reading
Because fake news can have real world consequences
Because access equals opportunity
Because hands on learning builds stronger brains
Because free wi-fi shouldn’t require a receipt
Because a little know how can make a smart phone smarter
Because you might take an interest in Gardening at 3 A.M.
Because a library card is the most important school supply of all
Because students who read during the summer, end up on the honor roll in the Fall
Because learning starts before kindergarten
Because it’s 3 A.M. and you need to read Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
Because txt rfine, but srsly, ppl also need 2 c real sentences
Because 5 out of 5 doctors agree, reading aloud to children supports brain development
Because adding Minecraft to curriculum may inspire more future engineers than mathematics alone
Because learning to read comes before reading to learn
Because there are more than 14,400,000 search results for the 2016 presidential election
Because more than a quarter of U.S. households don’t have a computer with an internet connection
Because why shouldn’t you be able to bring your grande caramel snickerdoodle macchiato?
Because students can’t afford scholarly journals on a ramen noodle budget
Because employers want candidates who know the difference between a web search and research
Because punctuation without imagination makes a sentence, not a story
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

'Open the doors and let these books in' - what would a truly diverse reading list look like?

'Open the doors and let these books in' - what would a truly diverse reading list look like? | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Following student calls for university English literature syllabuses to be ‘decolonised’, Hanif Kureishi, Arundhati Roy, Kamila Shamsie and other authors reflect on the debate and choose essential books by black and minority ethnic writers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Against Amazon: Seven Arguments, One Manifesto

Against Amazon: Seven Arguments, One Manifesto | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

AGAINST AMAZON: SEVEN ARGUMENTS, ONE MANIFESTO
"AMAZON APPROPRIATED OUR BOOKS. WE WILL APPROPRIATE AMAZON LOGIC."

November 15, 2017  By Jorge Carrión Share:

I.
Because I don’t want to be an accomplice to symbolic expropriation.

For 55 years that building in Barcelona, one of city’s few examples of modern industrial architecture, was the head office of the publishers Gustavo Gili. Now, after a refurbishment costing several million euros, it has become Amazon’s local center of operations. Thanks to the technology of efficiency and immediacy it houses, Barcelona is now one of the 45 cities in the world where the company guarantees delivery of products in an hour. The Canuda bookshop that shut in 2013 after over 80 years’ of existence is now a gigantic Mango. The Catalònia bookshop, after over a hundred, is now a McDonald’s with a kitsch modernist decor. Expropriation is literal and physical, but also symbolic.

If you enter “Amazon bookshop” on Google, dozens of links appear to Amazon pages that sell bookshelves. As I will never tire of repeating: Amazon is not a bookshop, it is a hypermarket. Its warehouses store books next to toasters, toys or skateboards. In its new physical bookshops books are placed face up, because they only display the 5,000 best-selling books most sought after by their customers, a lot less than the number on the shelves of genuine bookshops that are prepared to take risks. Amazon is now considering whether to repeat the same operation with a chain of small supermarkets. As far as it is concerned there is no difference between a cultural institution and an establishment that sells food and other goods.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee taken off Mississippi school reading list

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee taken off Mississippi school reading list | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee’s classic novel about racism and the American south, has been removed from a junior-high reading list in a Mississippi school district because the language in the book “makes people uncomfortable”.

Why Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird endures to tell its tale of radical change
The Sun Herald reported that administrators in Biloxi pulled the novel from the eighth-grade curriculum this week.

Kenny Holloway, vice-president of the Biloxi school board, told the newspaper: “There were complaints about it. There is some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable, and we can teach the same lesson with other books. It’s still in our library. But they’re going to use another book in the eighth-grade course.”

A message on the Biloxi schools website said To Kill a Mockingbird teaches students that compassion and empathy do not depend upon race or education.

Published in 1960, Lee’s Pulitzer-winning novel deals with racial inequality in a small Alabama town, in the aftermath of an alleged rape of a white woman for which a black man is tried. It has sold more than 40m copies and it was made into a film in 1962, winning three Oscars.

An email to the Sun Herald from a concerned reader referred to the book’s use of the word “nigger” when it said the school board’s decision was made “mid-lesson plan”.

“The students will not be allowed to finish the reading of To Kill a Mockingbird,” the email said “… due to the use of the ‘N’ word.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

bookofjoe: Library Sound Archives

bookofjoe: Library Sound Archives | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The incredible record libraries where you can listen to vast archives for free — the way we like it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Melissa Jacobs Takes Top Library Position at NYC Department of Education

Melissa Jacobs Takes Top Library Position at NYC Department of Education | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Attracting more educators into the library profession, expanding maker spaces in schools, and creating more opportunities for librarians in public and nonpublic schools to learn from one another are among Melissa Jacobs’s priorities as the New York City Department of Education’s (NYCDOE) new director of library services.

Named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker in 2015, Jacobs has led a variety of efforts designed to encourage librarians to take leadership roles in their schools and in national organizations. .
Sue Kowalski, a librarian in the East Syracuse Minoa School District, calls Jacobs a “human connector.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Incheon opens library for blind people

Incheon opens library for blind people | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Incheon opened its first Braille library in Nam-gu last month. More than 13,000 blind people live in Incheon, accounting for 10 percent of registered disabled people in the city. The district government spent 2.1 billion won ($1.93 million) establishing the three-story, 766-square-meter building. It has 3,673 books in Braille and 18,000 other books. The library also transcribes books into Braille using a Braillo 400SR machine. Once the books are in Braille, they are also made into audio books.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Mini Free-For-All Library Set Up in Downtown Cairo

Mini Free-For-All Library Set Up in Downtown Cairo | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Photo credit: Khaled Al- Safty/Egypt Independent
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Library closures mean lonely people will be left out in the cold this Christmas time

Library closures mean lonely people will be left out in the cold this Christmas time | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
n my eight years working in libraries across the country, I have known librarians trudge nearly ten miles through the snow because the roads were closed rather than leave library visitors stranded in the cold.

Librarians across the country are pulling together to make positive changes out of challenges
I have seen library staff cancel their plans to meet a friend or get a haircut in order to cover their sick colleagues and ensure that it is business as usual at the library. And I have kept my family waiting at home, with my dinner going cold, to detour from my evening commute to the doorstep of a lady who said, “without my books I am just sitting around waiting to die”. For many people in the communities we serve, the library service is a lifeline.

That is why we who work in the libraries are so passionate about providing the best, most accessible service we can. Yet there will be people this Christmas for whom the local library doors will be closed. And there will be isolated individuals sitting at home longing for a mobile library or home library visit that will never come.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A Welsh Library Where You Can Stay the Night

A Welsh Library Where You Can Stay the Night | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Falling asleep in a library is typically the hallmark of an overstressed student, slumped over a desk piled with books in a fit of exam-induced exhaustion. But at this library in a small Welsh village, sleeping among the books is part of the appeal. Top Places in Wales Gladstone Library is the only residential library in the United Kingdom. After browsing the more than 150,000 items in its collection and spending the day snuggled atop the plush chairs, stayover guests can retire to one of the 26 boutique bedrooms on site. Guests have access to the reading rooms until 10 p.m., a full five hours after they close to the public. They can even bring a book back to their room with them (except for those in the Gladstone Foundation Collection) for a bit of bedside reading.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Bring innovative libraries to 100,000 Africans

Bring innovative libraries to 100,000 Africans | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Well-trained librarians can help improve low literacy rates, improve education for thousands, and promote community development. However, Africa's librarians lack support. This project will train 20 librarians in leadership, innovation, and information, communications, and technology (ICT) through the International Network of Emerging Library Innovators-Sub-Saharan Africa (INELI-SSAf) program. This program has the potential to impact 100,000 individuals and advance libraries in Africa.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

The New York Public Library Unveils Master Plan for Its Iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building - Archiscene - Your Daily Architecture & Design Update

The New York Public Library Unveils Master Plan for Its Iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building - Archiscene - Your Daily Architecture & Design Update | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library has unveiled a Master Plan for its iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, one of the nation’s leading research libraries, which for over a century has stood as a symbol of open and free access to information and opportunity.
The $317 million plan for the historic Midtown building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street was shared at the Library’s Board of Trustees meeting this evening, and calls for an approximate 20% increase in public space for research, exhibitions, and educational programs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving

5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

5 Library Things to be Grateful for this Thanksgiving

1.IMLS and LSTA funding is safe for now. 

2. Librarian activists are making a major impact. In addition to advocating for civil liberties and privacy protections, librarians continue to play an active role in preserving and protecting data. 

3. The job market for librarians is looking positive. Library Journal‘s recently released annual Placements and Salaries survey shows full-time librarian salaries are up, as are the number of librarian placements for MLIS students. 

4. People – especially younger generations – are still using libraries..

5. Librarians continue to be wildly creative and funny. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

New York Public Library's Main Branch to undergo $317mn renovation

New York Public Library's Main Branch to undergo $317mn renovation | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library's Main Branch, known for the two stone lions that guard its imposing entrance, is about to undergo a $317 million renovation. The library, located at 476 Fifth Avenue and popular among tourists, is one of the top research libraries in the US, drawing scholars from across the country, reports Efe news. The renovation of the flagship building, which opened in 1911 and was constructed in the Beaux-Arts architectural style, will not be completed until late 2021. Four years ago, when another renovation project was proposed, a group of scholars threatened to sue the library if it proceeded to remove its century-old book stacks and turn part of the research library into a circulating library. The new renovation project is designed to increase the space available for research, exhibit and study rooms by 20 per cent, as well as adding a coffee house, shop, elevator and terrace. The master plan, however, avoids the touchy issue of the stacks, which were installed in 1911 and do not meet modern preservation standards for temperature, humidity and fire safety
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Five Laws of Library Science

Five Laws of Library Science | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

FIVE LAWS OF LIBRARY SCIENCE ➨ The 5 Laws of Library Science is a theory proposed by S. R. Ranganathan in 1931, detailing the principles of operating a library system. Five laws of library science are called the set of norms, percepts, and guides to good practice in librarianship. Many librarians worldwide accept them as the foundations of their philosophy. Dr. S.R. Ranganathan conceived the Five Laws of Library Science in 1924. The statements embodying these laws were formulated in 1928. These laws were first published in Ranganathan's classic book entitled Five Laws of Library Science in 1931.

These laws are:
Books are for use.
Every reader his / her book.
Every book its reader.
Save the time of the reader.
The library is a growing organism.

These laws of Library Science are the "fundamental laws" of Library Science. These are applicable to any problem in the areas of library science, library service, and library practice. These laws are like pot containing oceans. Prior to their enunciation, the subject of Library Science had no philosophy. These laws gave a philosophical base, guaranteeing an everlasting future to the subject of library science, the profession of librarianship, and the use of libraries. These laws have provided a scientific approach to the subject of library science. Even though S.R. Ranganathan proposed the Five Laws of Library Science before the advent of the digital age, they are still valid and equally relevant today. 

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Salman Haider describes the working of the laws in modern times.
more...
Jane Cowell's curator insight, November 28, 1:55 PM
Described for modern libraries
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

8 Ways To Make Your Library More Visible Now

8 Ways To Make Your Library More Visible Now | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
When I became a school library media specialist 20 years ago, I had no idea how much time and energy I would devote to promoting my role and media program. As school librarians, our impact isn’t always apparent, and our roles are frequently questioned.
That’s ironic to me because year to year our role evolves more than that of any other faculty member. We must adapt and grow with changes in curriculum, students’ needs, and the expectations of teachers and administrators. What I do in my media program at Brookwood High School (BHS) in Snellville, GA, may be unlike from what happens at the other 20 high schools in my county. Each school offers different courses and electives. Some librarians have additional duties assigned by administrators, and the professional development that we offer varies. Our priorities are student-centered and we strive for their success.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Mississippi school board pulls 'To Kill a Mockingbird' from reading list

Mississippi school board pulls 'To Kill a Mockingbird' from reading list | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

The school board in Biloxi, Mississippi, has pulled "To Kill a Mockingbird" from an eighth-grade reading list after receiving complaints about wording in the book.

Last week, Kenny Holloway, the board's vice president, said there was language in the book that "makes people uncomfortable."

"We can teach the same lesson with other books," Holloway said, according to the The Sun Herald newspaper. "It's still in our library. But they're going to use another book in the eighth-grade course."

The Biloxi School District didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

The book will still be available to check out from the library and is still listed on the school website as part of the eighth-grade English Learning Arts program.

The Sun Herald reported that a reader said the decision stems around the book's use of the n-word. A syllabus posted on the school system's website says questions to focus on include "What does it mean to be racist?" and "What is the difference between tradition and ignorance?"

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, written by the late Harper Lee and published in 1960, centers on racial inequality and injustices in the Deep South. In 2009 and 2011, the American Library Association listed the novel as one of the "Top Ten Most Challenged Books.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Unbelievable. But the book will still be available to check out from the library!!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Louis L'Amour's Library and Reading List | Art of Manliness

Louis L'Amour's Library and Reading List | Art of Manliness | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Welcome back to our series on the libraries of great men. The eminent men of history were often voracious readers and their own philosophy represents a distillation of all the great works they fed into their minds. This series seeks to trace the stream of their thinking back to the source. For, as David Leach, a now retired business executive put it: “Don’t follow your mentors; follow your mentors’ mentors.”

When digging in to the best novels and authors in the Western genre of literature, there are a few names that pop up over and over again. Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Zane Grey, and of course, Louis L’Amour. Over the course of his prolific career, L’Amour published over 100 books — most of them novels, but also over a dozen short story collections, and one brilliant autobiography, Education of a Wandering Man, which is more of a journal of his prodigious reading rather than a life telling (note: all quotes in this piece are from that book). Amazingly, not a single novel of his was published until 1951 when he was in his early 40s, though he had been writing poems and stories his whole adult life.

Though he’ll rarely be praised for writing beautiful or lyrical prose, L’Amour is one of the top 25 bestselling authors of all time, and when you ask grandpas — yes, as a whole category — about their favorite authors, he seems to almost universally top their lists. L’Amour writes with a realistic quality that isn’t easily matched in the genre, balancing both the romance and realities of Western life. His action scenes are superb, but more striking are his lifelike depictions of the landscape, the horses and horsemanship, the movements and habits of American Indians. Few have ever researched and truly lived the West like L’Amour.
more...
No comment yet.