Librarysoul
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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves – In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves – In the Library with the Lead Pipe | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Vocational awe describes the set of ideas, values, and assumptions librarians have about themselves and the profession that result in notions that libraries as institutions are inherently good, sacred notions, and therefore beyond critique. I argue that the concept of vocational awe directly correlates to problems within librarianship like burnout and low salary. This article aims to describe the phenomenon and its effects on library philosophies and practices so that they may be recognized and deconstructed.

by Fobazi Ettarh

Author’s note: I use “librarians” here very broadly. I am not limiting the term to those who have the MLIS because vocational awe affects those who work in libraries at every level. I would argue that it often affects staff more than it does librarians due to the sociodemographics of people in staff level positions as well as the job precarity that many staff positions hold.

Introduction
On June 1st, Mike Newell wrote about Chera Kowalski and other librarians administering the anti-overdose drug Naloxone (more commonly known as Narcan) to patrons in and around McPherson Square Branch in Philadelphia.1 The article went viral and was shared sixteen thousand times. Since then, Kowalski has saved dozens more lives through the administration of Naloxone. More libraries have since followed Philadelphia’s lead in Narcan training. Senator Patrick Maloney of New York introduced the Life-saving Librarians Act2 giving the Secretary of Health and Human Services the authority to award grants for Naloxone rescue kits in public libraries. To Senator Malone, and many librarians, training librarians to be literal life-savers makes sense because it serves the needs of patrons in our communities, and society as a whole. In addition to this core value of service, democracy is another value many believe libraries bring to society. Hillary Clinton, at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, commended Kowalski’s work and also stated, “…You are guardians of the First Amendment and the freedom to read and to speak. The work you do is at the heart of an open, inclusive, diverse society [and] I believe that libraries and democracy go hand in hand.”3
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Why Gen Z needs librarians now more than ever

Why Gen Z needs librarians now more than ever | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Whether guiding research or introducing new tech, today’s librarian gives Gen Z the skills they need to move from ‘getting it right now’ to ‘getting it right.’
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A tribute to librarians, heroes of modern times

A tribute to librarians, heroes of modern times | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

What would we do without librarians? Although very discreet, librarians have had a pivotal role in the information society and in the world at large, a proof that true heroes of modern times are not those who first come to our mind. Both traditional and digital libraries are extensively covered by the media, but what about all those who work there, especially librarians in small or underfunded libraries?

Since the 15th century, after the birth of the printed book, librarians have worked hard, with great conviction and little means, in all kinds of general and specialized libraries. At first, librarians were local historians and had other volunteer roles. After decades of discussions at many levels – local, national, regional, international -, being a librarian has become a job and even a profession.

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The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room

The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Training Rooms in Libraries

Library space, where librarians teach information literacy, should not look like an old-fashioned classroom or a computerized training room which might be found in a computer centre. In a traditional information technology training room or a computer laboratory.  The furniture and its arrangement convey messages to occupants: don’t move, don’t discuss, don’t feel comfortable! Tables are usually placed in rows. There are rarely windows that allow views of the outside world. The computers and large monitors dominate, there might be some digitized displays – but there is limited space for the learners. The students using the facility will become tired very quickly. The following images of traditional training rooms typify the stereotyped and stultifying atmosphere which develops, even if the colours are bright.
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Why librarians (and therefore libraries) will always be better than Wikipedia, by Kimberly Matthews

Why librarians (and therefore libraries) will always be better than Wikipedia, by Kimberly Matthews | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

"As librarians we protect our services, collections, and patrons from censorship and bias. Simply put- We do not allow it. From too much left or right wing material to too much sci-fi or mystery. At our core we begin from a place of balance, equality, representation, and non-censorship.  This is one of librarianship’s inherent characteristics that draw people to join the profession.

Interestingly I found this today:

Wikipedia Countering Systemic Bias Project

The Wikipedia project suffers systemic bias that naturally grows from its contributors’ demographic groups, manifesting an imbalanced coverage of a subject, thereby discriminating against the less represented demographic groups. …
This project aims to control and (possibly) eliminate the cultural perspective gaps made by the systemic bias, consciously focusing upon subjects and points of view neglected by the encyclopedia as a whole."


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 13, 2015 8:45 AM

Librarian's worth!

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The time for Libraries is NOW - Slideshare

Ned Potter:

"This is a call to arms for libraries, inspired loosely by the famous SHIFT HAPPENS deck.

Feel free to embed it anywhere and everywhere, with attribution."


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News Literacy for All

News Literacy for All | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

I’m not really here for discussions about “fake news,” but I’m all for critical information literacy, including critical news literacy, and so are a group of librarians at Washtenaw Community College’s Bailey Library. Meghan Rose, Martha Stuit, and Amy Lee presented a poster recently at the Michigan Academic Library Association’s annual conference on their recent efforts to overhaul a News Literacy Libguide and use it as a springboard for instruction.

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Tattoos and baseball caps: This is What a Librarian Looks Like – in pictures

Tattoos and baseball caps: This is What a Librarian Looks Like – in pictures | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
From Gucci to Prada, so-called librarian chic is huge in fashion. But a new book by Kyle Cassidy reads between the lines to challenge the stereotypes of librarian style – and look at the ways in which they are the champions of our communities
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Librarians across the country protest, resist, and persist » MobyLives

Librarians across the country protest, resist, and persist » MobyLives | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
We’ve already written about the incredible work that librarians are doing on the front lines of the fight against fake news. But their resistance against the current administration is also more immediate, more direct, and more far-reaching than that effort. Elizabeth Flock at PBS NewsHour took a look at what libraries across the country are offering their communities, from protests to sanctuary.

Librarians found the executive orders aimed at immigrants particularly offensive, because, as Massachusetts librarian Elizabeth McKinstry told Flock, “We are huge resources for newcomers to this country, whether it’s for connection to this country, legal resources, testing preparation, citizen tests, services like storytimes or homework help. We are there for the most vulnerable folks in our communities, people on the other side of the digital or language divide.”
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Book Review Site for Librarians in Public Libraries and School Libraries | Booklist Online

Book Review Site for Librarians in Public Libraries and School Libraries | Booklist Online | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Booklist Online: More than 170,000 book reviews for librarians, book groups, and book lovers—from the trusted experts at the American Library Association

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Locating librarianship’s identity in its historical roots of professional philosophies: towards a radical new identity for librarians of today (and tomorrow)

Sara Wingate Gray, Department of Information Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. Email: uczcswi@ucl.ac.ukAbstract

‘Librarian identity’ is a contested arena, seemingly caught up in a values-war between traditional principles of ‘citizenship’ and late 20th century’s shift to a democracy of consumerists. New professionals may be wary of associating with established systems of their own professional hierarchies when professional associations may be perceived as not having paid enough attention to how this shift in values has been effected, yet this is the key question to address: how has this shift towards ‘information management/consumption’; the library member now as ‘customer’; and new models of library provision by private or social enterprises, impacted on the profession’s identity as a whole?..."

 

Full text: http://ifl.sagepub.com/content/39/1/37.full

Full text (pdf): http://ifl.sagepub.com/content/39/1/37.full.pdf+html

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 24, 2013 5:30 AM

Full text article in IFLA journal!