Libraries & Archives 101
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Libraries & Archives 101
Everything and anything you ever wanted to know about what's going on in World Libraries & Archives
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Rescooped by Marylène Goulet from The Information Professional
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The Future of Libraries - 7 questions librarians need to answer - Lee Rainie (Slideshare)

"Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, runs through the seven questions libraries need to address as they consider future services and their role for their patrons and communities. He describes how project research about the changing role of technology in people’s lives affects the kinds of issues librarians need to address as they experience the disruptions of technology change."

[...]

1.  What’s the future of knowledge? 2.  What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3.  What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4.  What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5.  What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)? 6.  What’s the franchise?7: Where do you fit on the dashboard?"

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 11, 2014 7:10 AM

Great questions to answer for the profession.

Marylène Goulet's comment, April 20, 2014 8:32 PM
Slide no. 29
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The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found

The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found | Libraries & Archives 101 | Scoop.it

By Ian Anstice:

"The Guardian held one of its online debates on libraries today. The discussion between several library experts (managers, campaigners, councillors) and anyone contributing online. Around 200 comments were made so it’s a little condfusing: I’ve endeavoured to summarise below, although doubtless I have missed some things which some would consider important. Main threads and arguments.

Are libraries declining due to technological change? Libraries are still needed, in some ways more than ever: internet/online access essential and libraries provide the access and skills to those without either or both. Seven million have never used the internet. Wikipedia etc don’t cover all information and are prone to deletion, accidental or otherwise and is also not entirely trustworthy anyway.  Libraries provide quiet study spaces.  Children need the books and everyone needs serendipity that bookshelves allow.  Bookstock is declining due to budget cuts.  It’s not black and white – books and e-books will co-exist. Books are still in demand with 244 million loans in England 2011/12,

Read more: http://www.publiclibrariesnews.com/2013/11/the-future-of-libraries-what-the-guardian-online-debate-found.html


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:40 AM

Main threads and arguments in the discussions! Interesting!

Alexina's curator insight, November 30, 2013 8:00 PM

This is a short summary of an extensive online discussion about public libraries in the UK, but much of the discussion applies to USA libraries too. I like libraries referred to as "Idea stores".

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The League of Extraordinary Librarians: media specialists are leading the way as tech superheroes

The League of Extraordinary Librarians: media specialists are leading the way as tech superheroes | Libraries & Archives 101 | Scoop.it

Meet the latest tech superheroes: school librarians. According to School Library Journal’s 2012 School Technology Survey, media specialists are leading the charge to bring new media, mobile devices, social apps, and web-based technologies into our nation’s classrooms.

 

So far, the results have been pretty impressive: 87 percent of school librarians report that they’re in charge of their library’s technology, with 60 percent adding that they’ve also introduced it into the classroom. Furthermore, 44 percent now serve on their school’s tech team, and in these budget-troubled times, when many library positions are on the line, that role may mean increased job security. In fact, 55 percent of the elementary, middle, and high school librarians that responded to our survey say that their tech skills have increased their value in administrators’ eyes.


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 24, 2013 5:09 AM

Librarians are tech superheroes as well!