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What Is The Relationship Between Reading And Writing? It’s Linear -

What Is The Relationship Between Reading And Writing? It’s Linear - | Future of education | Scoop.it

How Can Schools Produce Better Readers? Write Twice As Much With 1/2 The Rules

contributed by Dennis Pierce

In a wide-ranging interview, ASU researcher Steve Graham noted that reading and writing skills are closely linked—and each helps improve the other. He also revealed four other key insights about writing instruction.

Reading and writing are forever intertwined.

They draw upon shared knowledge bases, and they work together in helping students learn about a particular subject. And it turns out they also help each other, says researcher Steve Graham.

Graham is the Mary Emily Warner Professor in the Division of Leadership and Innovation at Arizona State University’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. For more than 30 years, he has studied how writing develops, how to teach it effectively, and how writing can be used to support both reading and learning.

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5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework

5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework | Future of education | Scoop.it

Digital Literacy is increasingly important in an age where many students read as much on screens as they do from books.

In fact, the very definition of many of these terms is changing as the overlap across media forms increases. Interactive eBooks can function like both long-form blogs and traditional books. Threaded email can look and function like social media. Email and texting and social media messaging are increasingly similar.

This is the modern digital era.

The above framework was developed by Juliet Hinrichsen and Antony Coombs at the University of Greenwich. Explaining its origins, they describe the model as “a framework to articulate the scope and dimensions of digital literacies. It is based on an established model of literacy which is underpinned by critical perspectives (the Four Resources Model of Critical Literacy, after Luke & Freebody). It has been adapted for the digital context.”

The framework is minimalist in design, forgoing any kind of analysis of each dimension, or examples of how readers may use them, but that’s part of its charm: At a glance it refracts digital literacy rather succinctly.

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5 Risks Posed by the Increasing Misuse of Technology in Schools - EdSurge News

5 Risks Posed by the Increasing Misuse of Technology in Schools   - EdSurge News | Future of education | Scoop.it

At any given moment in the day, I am attached to my cellphone, my iPad or my computer. As a writer, I was an early convert to the computer. I began writing on a TRS-80 from Radio Shack in 1983 on wonderful writing software called WordPerfect, which has mysteriously disappeared. I had two TRS-80s, because one of them was always in repair. I love the computer for many reasons. I no longer had to white out my errors; I no longer had to retype an entire article because of errors. My handwriting is almost completely illegible. The computer is a godsend for a writer and editor.

I have seen teachers who use technology to inspire inquiry, research, creativity and excitement. I understand what a powerful tool it is.

But it is also fraught with risk, and the tech industry has not done enough to mitigate the risks.

Risk One: The Threat to Student Privacy
Risk one is the invasion of student privacy, utilizing data by tech companies collected when students are online. The story of inBloom is a cautionary tale. Funded in 2014 with $100 million from the Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation, inBloom intended to collect massive amounts of personally identifiable student data and use it to “personalize” learning to each student.

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30 creative ways to use Padlet for teachers and students | Future Ready School Libraries - Online Marketing Scoops

30 creative ways to use Padlet for teachers and students | Future Ready School Libraries - Online Marketing Scoops | Future of education | Scoop.it
30 creative ways to use Padlet for teachers and students Source: 30 creative ways to use Padlet for teachers and students | Future Ready School Libraries
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How collaborative learning prepares students for life after high school

How collaborative learning prepares students for life after high school | Future of education | Scoop.it
Instead of taking courses randomly as they did in the past, ninth-grade students now choose an academy and take an organized sequence of courses that gives them hands-on experience to prepare them for a specific career path. They also learn soft skills that they need to be successful in the workplace and beyond.

Ernie says today’s employers are looking for people who know how to do the work but also how to identify problems and work together to solve them. “Business and industry representatives tell us that we need to make sure that our students can work collaboratively, be creative and organized and must have critical thinking skills.”
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The Power to Give Anyone, Anywhere the Skills They Need Is Within Reach

The Power to Give Anyone, Anywhere the Skills They Need Is Within Reach | Future of education | Scoop.it

On a recent Friday afternoon, I was summoned to the top floor of a technology accelerator in San Francisco’s Soma neighborhood to meet Tom Impallomeni, a serial entrepreneur who promised to teach me to DJ. His latest project, a VR education company called Tribe VR, aims to teach real-world skills by building virtual training environments. The first application? A VR DJ school.

When I arrived and slipped on the headset, I grabbed the Oculus touch controllers and was soon confronted with a virtual (and complicated looking) DJ controller covered in dials and knobs. Playing music with it was like asking me to land a commercial jumbo jet. I had no idea how the thing worked.

Suddenly, a popup with text and an arrow instructed me to pick up any of the vinyl records on a nearby table. Next, I was shown where to place a record on the controller, how to press play, and soon enough I was playing music. After that, I learned the more difficult part of using the dials and knobs.

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15 Addictive Apps to Learn Languages and Never Stop | FluentU Language Learning Blog

15 Addictive Apps to Learn Languages and Never Stop | FluentU Language Learning Blog | Future of education | Scoop.it
Apps to learn languages can be seriously addictive—in a good, productive way. Start using one of these 15 addictive apps and you'll never stop learning!
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The Key Benefits of Content Curation – Content Curation Official Guide – Medium

If you search on Google for the benefits of content curation, you will find tens of articles that praise the advantages that curation can bring to the world of marketing and specifically to the universe of content production.

But besides the doubtful truthfulness of their claims, none of them, is written by a content curation expert. They are all written by “interested” parties. Either by content marketers with little or no experience in practicing curation, or by founders or stakeholder in companies that sell “content curation tools” as a service.

I started noticing this pattern of bloggers and content marketers heavily promoting content curation as a cure-for-all medicine, when I saw that among the key benefits listed, there were always three totally misleading promises:

a) curation can save significant time (to those who do it).

b) curation is a piece of cake. Easy to do. Anyone can do it.

c) curation will automatically increase your online visibility and reputation.

None of them is true. They are false promises made to lure individuals and organizations interested in those three benefits.

Although curation can save very significant time to those who benefit from it, it positively does not save any time at all to the curators who exercise it. It does to those who benefit from it.

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Learning FOMO: How curation can help prevent you from missing out on the development you expect

Learning FOMO: How curation can help prevent you from missing out on the development you expect | Future of education | Scoop.it
There’s been a lot of talk in recent years about the effect that our on-demand, social-media-fueled culture is having on our collective psyche. It’s nearly impossible to escape being inundated with information about the lives of our network—new jobs, promotions, weddings, parties, concerts, trips. While these events may be carefully curated for sharing, they can lead to the feeling that everyone else is experiencing the glorious wonders of something you are not. This phenomenon, called FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), not only arises in our personal lives but is also showing up in the workplace—particularly related to employees’ expectations to build and develop new skills and engage in new experiences. While careful curation may contribute to FOMO in our personal lives, it can actually help avoid FOMO in learning while improving learning effectiveness.
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The case for the new role of a Modern Learning Advisor – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine

The case for the new role of a Modern Learning Advisor – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine | Future of education | Scoop.it

The biggest innovation in workplace learning will not come from new technology but from supporting people to learn continuously
and to manage their own learning.”
Jane Hart, 2017

In a number of previous articles in the MWL Magazine, I have explained how modern professionals now recognise that they learn in many different ways at, through and for work.

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10 Trends Disrupting Digital Learning: Bersin’s Review and our Take | Anders Pink

10 Trends Disrupting Digital Learning: Bersin’s Review and our Take | Anders Pink | Future of education | Scoop.it


Digital Learning has changed. 10 years ago the default model was buy an LMS and load courses into it. But that’s not enough any more, if it ever was. In a recent review, veteran analyst Josh Bersin called out the trends that are disrupting the digital learning landscape. We share our take on them here, and what they means for Learning Professionals.

Change has come quickly
If you’re a buyer or vendor in corporate learning, change probably feels quite low. But as Josh points out, things have changed very quickly. We’ve moved from a fixed view of courses and platforms to a model of continuous digital learning, where people access whatever content they want, on any device, at any time:

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Lifelong Learning Is Good for Your Health, Your Wallet, and Your Social Life

Lifelong Learning Is Good for Your Health, Your Wallet, and Your Social Life | Future of education | Scoop.it

In 2015 Doreetha Daniels received her associate degree in social sciences from College of the Canyons, in Santa Clarita, California. But Daniels wasn’t a typical student: She was 99 years old. In the COC press release about her graduation, Daniels indicated that she wanted to get her degree simply to better herself; her six years of school during that pursuit were a testament to her will, determination, and commitment to learning.

Few of us will pursue college degrees as nonagenarians, or even as mid-career professionals (though recent statistics indicate that increasing numbers of people are pursuing college degrees at advanced ages). Some people never really liked school in the first place, sitting still at a desk for hours on end or suffering through what seemed to be impractical courses. And almost all of us have limits on our time and finances — due to kids, social organizations, work, and more — that make additional formal education impractical or impossible.

As we age, though, learning isn’t simply about earning degrees or attending storied institutions. Books, online courses, MOOCs, professional development programs, podcasts, and other resources have never been more abundant or accessible, making it easier than ever to make a habit of lifelong learning. Every day, each of us is offered the opportunity to pursue intellectual development in ways that are tailored to our learning style.

So why don’t more of us seize that opportunity? We know it’s worth the time, and yet we find it so hard to make the time. The next time you’re tempted to put learning on the back burner, remember a few points:


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Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative

Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative | Future of education | Scoop.it
THE RECEPTION AREA contains a segment of a decommissioned Underground train carriage, where visitors wait to be collected. The surfaces are wood and glass. In each room the talk is of code, web development and data science. At first sight the London office of General Assembly looks like that of any other tech startup.
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Eigen creativiteit verslaat uitgewerkte lesactiviteiten

Eigen creativiteit verslaat uitgewerkte lesactiviteiten | Future of education | Scoop.it

5.000 Deense kleuters (Bleses et al.,2018)
Ik wil het hebben over de uitkomst van een groot Deens taalonderzoek om bij 5.000 kleuters de mondelinge taalvaardigheid en de beginnende geletterdheid te verhogen. Zo’n grootschalig project, dat is wat voor ervaren mensen: bekende Amerikaanse onderzoekers en ervaren Deense onderzoekers werkten samen. Ze vroegen zich af of ze hun eerdere successen ook op grote schaal konden herhalen.

Je zou nu denken dat zulke experts perfect weten wat de belangrijkste ingrediënten van hun eerder successen zijn. Maar zelfs voor hen is het soms maar gissen. Elk taalproject bevat immers een mix van diverse ideeën waarvan we geloven dat ze de taalontwikkeling van kleuters positief beïnvloeden. Achteraf is het heel moeilijk te achterhalen welke component nu het meest effectief was.

Onderzoekers zouden geen onderzoekers zijn als ze niet voortdurend meer willen weten. Daarom besloten ze om verschillende varianten van hun eerder taalproject met elkaar te vergelijken. Om helemaal eerlijk te spelen, kregen de kleuterscholen geen keuze over de variant waarin ze terecht zouden komen.

De test: grote groep versus kleine groep, uitgewerkte lesjes versus open variant
Centraal stond een programma dat de mondelinge taal en de beginnende geletterdheid bevordert met de naam LEAP. Het programma bevat 40 speelse uitgewerkte lesjes om 2x per week uit te voeren. Drie varianten werden vergeleken:

 De variant in kleine groep, waarbij alle activiteiten met ongeveer 5 kleuters uitgevoerd werden
De variant in grote groep, waarbij alle activiteiten met de hele klas uitgevoerd werden
De open variant, waarbij de leerkrachten de uitgewerkte lesjes niet kregen, maar wel op hun eigen manier twee maal per week in kleine groep aan de voorgeschreven doelen mochten werken
Daarnaast was er nog een controlegroep.

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Minerva: The Intentional University | Getting Smart

Minerva: The Intentional University | Getting Smart | Future of education | Scoop.it

The blueprint is detailed in a new book, Building the Intentional University: Minerva and the Future of Higher Education edited by Chief Academic Officer Stephen M. Kosslyn and CEO Ben Nelson and with a foreword by Senator Bob Kerrey.

At Minerva, now the most selective university in the world, Kosslyn created a focus on active learning, “where every student is expected to be actively involved in every class.” Minerva students build “practical knowledge” aiming at global contribution.

The book is part of an active campaign to challenge higher education to adopt this intentional design or devise something better.

“The literature is crystal clear in showing that students learn best when they have to use the material, not simply sit passively and hear it described,” observed Kosslyn, the former Harvard dean of Social Sciences.

Kosslyn’s graduate training at Stanford focused on the intersection of cognitive psychology and Artificial Intelligence. He is co-author of Cognitive Psychology: Mind and Brain (one of 14 books he’s written or co-authored) and is one of the most respected learning scientists in the world.

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3 Necessary Skills for Educators in the Era of A.I. | Getting Smart

3 Necessary Skills for Educators in the Era of A.I. | Getting Smart | Future of education | Scoop.it

By now, we’ve all heard the warnings: artificial intelligence is on its way, and it’s going to radically change education, business, healthcare, and every other sector.
It’s time we considered the increasing impact of AI in education. Educators have already previewed examples of the changes coming their way. Automation technology has been introduced for a variety of basic teaching tasks.

Tools like Gradecam and Gradescope can take over grading. AI makes it possible for these tools to read handwriting and score exams efficiently.
Educational software like IBM’s Watson teaches by adapting to every student’s experience, needs, and learning style.
Amy is an AI-powered app that tutors math lessons.

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How to become a connected educator

How to become a connected educator | Future of education | Scoop.it


By reaching beyond school walls and connecting with colleagues from around the globe, many educators have discovered vibrant learning communities in which teachers and leaders share ideas and propel each other to grow. See the 6 points below. Perhaps a good New Year’s resolution for educators around the world. I read this on the ISTE – web page. Perhaps I would have liked to see some reference to educators in other countries as well, but these are points that are valid wherever you are. Let’s connect and learn togehter!

1. Dedicate time for networking.
2. Participate in ed chats.
3. Join a network.
4. Attend conferences and edcamps. 

5. Share your ideas. 

6. Ask a connected educator for help.

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Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online

Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online | Future of education | Scoop.it

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Alarmed by the proliferation of false content online, state lawmakers around the country are pushing schools to put more emphasis on teaching students how to tell fact from fiction.

Lawmakers in several states have introduced or passed bills calling on public school systems to do more to teach media literacy skills that they say are critical to democracy. The effort has been bipartisan but has received little attention despite successful legislation in Washington state, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Mexico.

Several more states are expected to consider such bills in the coming year, including Arizona, New York and Hawaii.

I don't think it's a partisan issue to appreciate the importance of good information and the teaching of tools for navigating the information environment," said Hans Zeiger, a Republican state senator in Washington who co-sponsored a bill that passed in his state earlier this year. "There is such a thing as an objective source versus other kinds of sources, and that's an appropriate thing for schools to be teaching.

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Putting Empathy and Digital Citizenship at the Center of our Classrooms

Putting Empathy and Digital Citizenship at the Center of our Classrooms | Future of education | Scoop.it
Many teachers and students on our middle school campus rely on free resources from Scratch.mit.edu, a site developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, to introduce students to coding and engage them in creative projects. Some of our teachers include Scratch in their annual Hour of Code offerings; two teachers offer Scratch coding as part of their Design Lab classes; students in my English classes further their study of narrative by designing and coding Scratch games; another teacher uses Scratch in his Robotics and Engineering class; our librarian hosts a coding club in the library; and many of our students continue to build their coding skills with Scratch on their own. On any given day, one can expect to see some of our students working on Scratch coding projects.
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How Early Should Kids Begin STEM Education?

How Early Should Kids Begin STEM Education? | Future of education | Scoop.it

Current research results are in favor of early childhood experiences for students, especially those who are disadvantaged. This education is the great equalizer because it provides a rich, common foundation for children who may have diverse backgrounds and experiences. So what does that mean? Students are capable of learning far more than you think they can. Most teachers will tell you that children will rise up to the standard you set, so you may as well elevate the bar for learning. And that brings us to STEM education in early childhood. That’s right – early childhood is the perfect time 

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Kickstart curation in your workplace | LearnGeek

Kickstart curation in your workplace | LearnGeek | Future of education | Scoop.it

Curation is more than a trendy topic. It’s an old-school idea with the renewed power to shift L&D mindset and enable learning and problem solving in more scalable, personalized ways. It can help you keep up with the needs of the business by shifting L&D’s focus from creation to connection. Sure, we’ll still create plenty of materials, but, with a curation mindset, our first instinct becomes the activation the subject matter expertise across the organization. To summarize, curation is a good idea. If you need more of an argument to that point, David Kelly has you covered.

So if curation is such a good idea, why hasn’t it transformed the way information is shared in the workplace yet? Why is the company intranet still a mess of unsearchable folders filled with dated PowerPoint presentations? Why is all of the best information still saved on your employees’ personal drives? Well, just because it’s a good idea doesn’t mean people are going to just start doing it on their own. While we benefit from simple curation behaviors in everyday life (browser favorites, aggregation tools, social networks, Netflix, etc.), most orgs haven’t been able to transfer those behaviors into the workplace at scale. Instead, they continue to focus on technology and assume people will just naturally shift their behavior. Unfortunately, most of the tech is still bad, and people just don’t change that quickly without a clear WIIFM.

To that end, here are 3 practical steps you can take to kickstart curation in your organization.

Install a Curator
I firmly believe curation cannot have the impact desired without putting a skilled person at the helm. Clutter, confusion and the recreation of the wheel are the very nature of complex organizations. Someone must be formally installed as the “company curator” and charged with making information and insight easier to find, share and apply.

The last season of Halt and Catch Fire included an interesting example of this premise. As the characters were building what was likely an early version of Yahoo, they found it increasingly difficult to organize rapidly-expanding web content. Therefore, they hired a chief ontologist (scene below). She brought a unique perspective on how to make information more accessible and useful to a burgeoning internet audience.

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"The urgent challenge to HR leaders is to apply a consumer and a digital lens to the HR function."

"The urgent challenge to HR leaders is to apply a consumer and a digital lens to the HR function." | Future of education | Scoop.it

Jeanne Meister is the founder of HR advisory and research firm Future Workplace. In 2015, Jeanne was named to the list of the top 50 Influencers in Corporate Human Resources and Recruiting by Glassdoor. She will be keynoting at Learning Live on September 6th and 7th on what employees will look for in the future workplace and what this means for organisations.

Jamie Lawrence, Managing Editor, TrainingZone: What's  your advice to organisations who don't know if Millennials are different or whether differences have been magnified to date?
Jeanne Meister, Founding Partner, The Future Workplace: By 2025, millennials (born between 1982 and 1993) will comprise more than three quarters of the global workforce. In the United  States, millennials became the largest generational cohort in the workforce, but this is not the case in Europe.

According to Pew Research, millennials are the European Union's minority population with Eurostat estimating that the retirement age population in European countries will be larger than the working age population by 2040. But in India, the demographics are quite different. Morgan Stanley estimates that India's millennial population is at 407 million today, the largest Millennial cohort in the world, and this is estimated to grow by another 100 million by 2020.

But the question continues: are millennials different from the rest of the generations or are they representative of young people at this stage of life? At a macro level, millennials want what we all want from work: flexibility to work where, when and how they want, purposeful work and access to continuous on-demand learning.

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Satisfaction with Learning Technology Is Inextricably Linked to Strategy and Planning

Satisfaction with Learning Technology Is Inextricably Linked to Strategy and Planning | Future of education | Scoop.it
In a relatively short period of time, the learning technology landscape has exploded from a set of well-defined tools, such as a learning management system (LMS) or authoring tools, to a vast array of solutions aimed at delivering a variety of learning experiences and content across a spectrum of devices and media.

Organizations used to have one line item in the budget for technology, but today there potentially could be dozens of different platforms being deployed at once.

The complexity of the technology landscape means that organizations need to be highly prepared to navigate if they want to be sure they are deploying the right solutions to execute on their learning strategy. Unfortunately, nearly two-thirds of companies have either a poorly defined technology strategy, or—worse—no strategy at all, according to Brandon Hall Group’s 2017 Learning Technology Study.

Only about one-third of the companies have a mature strategy for their technology and have integrated it with other systems, according to the research. And while these companies are better positioned to take advantage of their available technology, even fewer (12 percent) have the data analysis in place to draw sound conclusions about learning’s impact on the business. And while large companies (10,000-plus employees) are more likely to have technology in place, the maturity levels remain about the same, with only 15 percent (compared with 12 percent overall) at what we call an “optimized” learning technology maturity level.
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Lifelong learning helps people, governments and business. Why don't we do more of it?

Lifelong learning helps people, governments and business. Why don't we do more of it? | Future of education | Scoop.it

Research shows the benefits of learning throughout life, but our education systems aren't being changed to support it.

Learning throughout life makes sense. Research shows it is good for your health, your wealth, your civic engagement and your family’s future prospects. It prolongs your independent life and enriches your quality of life. For companies, investing in worker skills makes sense too – it promotes flexibility and creativity, problem-solving, teamwork and an increased sense of agency among staff, making them happier and more productive. These are, of course, exactly the traits needed as companies face of the challenges of the latest industrial revolution. For governments, supporting learning in later life helps to delay the onset of dependency among rapidly ageing populations; plays an important role in overcoming inequality and exclusion; and supports inter-generational learning, creating more resilient families and communities. More broadly, learning fosters improved well-being.

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Make Learning a Lifelong Habit

Make Learning a Lifelong Habit | Future of education | Scoop.it

I recently worked my way through Edmund Morris’s first two Teddy Roosevelt biographies, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt and Theodore Rex. Roosevelt wasn’t without flaws, but he was by nearly all accounts fascinating and intellectually voracious. He published his first book, The Naval War of 1812, at 23 and continued to write on everything from conservation to politics and biography. According to Morris, at certain periods he was rumored to read a book a day, and all this reading and writing arguably made him both charismatic and uniquely equipped to engage the host of topics he did as president: national conservation efforts, naval expansion, trust regulation, and a variety of others.

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