Libel and Slander in schools
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Libel and Slander in schools
Examples of libel and slander in our school systems
Curated by Jase Miller
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Jury: Parent Carolyn Torrey defamed Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary principal Don Raymond

Jury: Parent Carolyn Torrey defamed Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary principal Don Raymond | Libel and Slander in schools | Scoop.it

This lawsuit is important because it shows that educators can sometimes win when it comes to libel and slander. It also shows the support some schools have of their employees by financing the money for the court case. It is also important to know that elected officials can not sue, but unelected positions like prinicipal and teachers can sue. It also shows that since all of her defamation was in the written form the court ruled that she had commited libel.

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Jase Miller's comment, September 1, 2012 3:18 PM
This lawsuit is important because it shows that educators can sometimes win when it comes to libel and slander. It also shows the support some schools have of their employees by financing the money for the court case. It is also important to know that elected officials can not sue, but unelected positions like prinicipal and teachers can sue. It also shows that since all of her defamation was in the written form the court ruled that she had commited libel. If her statements had been oral she would have been accused of slander.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 2, 2012 11:44 PM
Several important principles of libel/slander identified in this case Jase. I have seen this article before, so know about the suit--can you say why this teacher won the case?
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Constitutional - A Former High School Coach Can Sue Parents for Defamation

Constitutional - A Former High School Coach Can Sue Parents for Defamation | Libel and Slander in schools | Scoop.it
A former high school coach may be able to sue his parental tormentors for defamation.

Via Rudy Zacher
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Jase Miller's comment, September 1, 2012 1:42 PM
This article is interesting. It states that coaches and referrees are protected against physical attacks but no state protects them from verbal attacks. This is not true. I am a wrestling referee in Montana and we are protected from both physical and verbal abuse at least while refereeing. This case centers around the high school basketball coach that was fired from his position and would sue the parents for defamation. The courts are currently trying to prove that the statements made by the parents: a) were false, b) were made to a third party, and c) caused him to suffer some loss of reputation or other damages. I for one hope that this coach is reinstated.

Vikki Howard's comment, September 2, 2012 11:49 PM
Coaches (and players) (and officials) suffer terrible abuse by fan(atics), who for some reason feel that they have the right to act uncivilized at any sports venue. I was a student at Ohio State, and after attending my first game and listening to an octogenarian screaming wildly at the 19 year old players on the field throughout the game quit going to games; It will be very interesting to see if this coach prevails--Good summary of principles of law that may be in play in this suit.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 3, 2012 12:06 AM
Coaches (and players) (and officials) suffer terrible abuse by fan(atics), who for some reason feel that they have the right to act uncivilized at any sports venue. I was a student at Ohio State, and after attending my first game and listening to an octogenarian screaming wildly at the 19 year old players on the field throughout the game quit going to games; It will be very interesting to see if this coach prevails-You bring up several important implications of defamation related to sports and social media.
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Former student sues Fla. district for libel over student newspaper photo - SPLC News Flashes

Former student sues Fla. district for libel over student newspaper photo - SPLC News Flashes | Libel and Slander in schools | Scoop.it
Former student sues Fla.district for libel over student newspaper photo...
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Jase Miller's comment, September 1, 2012 3:03 PM
This article shows why it is important for teachers to obtain the students, and parents if minor, before releasing pictures and information about students to the public.
In this case the student argues that his picure in an STD ad has detrimentily harmed his reputation causing him to be a social outcast. In Gonzaga University v. Doe a student sued the school for violating his FERPA rights. The official who released the information did so upon the rumor that he had conducted sexual misconduct with another student.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 2, 2012 11:52 PM
FERPA laws require school officials to be careful with confidential information. In this case, the juxtaposition of a student's photo with an ad seemed to imply that the student was the victim of STDs--is his libel? how?
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Students Using the First Amendment to Slander Their Principals

Students Using the First Amendment to Slander Their Principals | Libel and Slander in schools | Scoop.it
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Jase Miller's comment, September 1, 2012 1:30 PM
This is important because it shows some of the limitations that teachers and administrators may have when it comes to protecting themselves from slanderous materials put forth by a second party about themselves. Schools have the ability to control what students do within their schools but not when the students are outside of school, In Draker v. Shielber, a Texas teacher took two students to court over a slanderous myspace page that the students had created. She filed for intentional defamation, libel per se, and emotional distress, but the court would dismiss her emotional distress plea and then dismiss her other pleas. The justice presiding over the case was disappointed in the initial outcome of the case because she felt that actions of the students were "outragous" and that there was no legal precedent that had already been passed that would help the teacher out.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 2, 2012 11:55 PM
Schools often take action, even when cyberbullying takes place off campus--particularly if there is a nexus--or disruption of the academic environment as a result. However, when teachers and administrators are the victims, the courts have been very stingy about acceding to the claim of defamation. Excellent related case--illustrating the point of difficulty that educators face in this toxic epidemic of cyber assassination