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Emergency Preparation in Early Education Programs

Emergency Preparation in Early Education Programs | Lessons Learned | Scoop.it
Many families make emergency preparedness a priority in the home, explaining to small children what to do in case of a fire, devising “family reunification plans,” and stocking up on supplies in ca...
DelValle Institute's insight:

A piece based on a Save The Children annual report that graded America's overall family preparedness as "unsatisfactory" while pointing out that only 54% of states (including Washington DC) require detailed plans from child care centers on how to care for children with special health needs in the event of an emergency. An interactive map in the body of the article allows you to view states and their individual requirements. 

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DelValle Institute's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:56 AM

A piece based on a Save The Children annual report that graded America's overall family preparedness as "unsatisfactory" while pointing out that only 54% of states (including Washington DC) require detailed plans from child care centers on how to care for children with special health needs in the event of an emergency. An interactive map in the body of the article allows you to view states and their individual requirements. 

 

 

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Experts Hope to Use Lessons of Sandy to Deal with Bigger Storms

Experts Hope to Use Lessons of Sandy to Deal with Bigger Storms | Lessons Learned | Scoop.it
Hurricane experts fear that something far worse than Sandy, blamed for $50 billion in damage, is brewing.
DelValle Institute's insight:

This piece discusses the increase in the number of large scale "superstorms" like Hurricane Sandy, and their impact on affected communities. One of the primary drivers of the increased cost of repairing the damage caused by these storms stems from the larger concentrations of people and infrastructure present along the coasts as population expansion forces communities to expand beyond their capacity. Coupled with rising sea levels, the article posits that the cost of repairing the damages caused by hurricanes, tornados, and other natural disasters will continue to grow, forcing emergency managers to work on mitigation techniques aimed at reducing structural damage during landfall.

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Reunification - Keeping Families Together in Crisis

Reunification- Keeping Families Together in Crisis
DelValle Institute's insight:

Published in: Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine (Volume 10, Issue 3)

 

Date Published: September, 2009

 

Pages: 12 (pp 195-206)

 

 

Planning and practice focuses on family and household level preparedness including discussions, resource inventory, and having a plan of action in the event of a separation. This section also discusses schools, as 67 million children are enrolled in kindergarten, schools, and daycare facilities, but only 15 states require reunification plans, and less than half of all American schools fail to meet the minimum requirements for reunification. A survey of 2,100 superintendents reveals that 30% have never conducted an evacuation drill, 22% have no plan for children with special healthcare needs, and 43% have never met with local emergency management officials to discuss planning.

 

The clinical services section discusses the issues at the hospital and triage level with regard to pediatric patients, with a special emphasis on psychological care and environmental safety. A 2000 study based on reported instances of child abuse showed that there is a large spike in abuse and mistreatment of children in the aftermath of hurricanes and earthquakes, and discusses the need for a system that allows constant tracking from the initial point of contact through the reunification process to mitigate these concerns.

 

Ancillary support points to the need for greater coordination between hospitals and partners during emergencies and the use of designated areas for specified services such as unification. These areas should be adequately staffed, and have ample supplies including food, blankets, and other materials that allow for sequestration. This section also discusses the need for interaction with the media in order to provide timely updates that families can rely on.

 

Transportation and accommodation goes into the importance on maintaining a dedicated tracking system that uses a centralized dispatch system. The importance of establishing protocols prior to an emergency are also emphasized, as the introduction of responders from neighboring cities or states may cause operational issues due to variances in standard operating procedures.

 

Communication and identification discusses the issues that arise during the transportation phase of an event, where victims may be hastily transported across long distances. Specifically, in the days following Hurricane Katrina, 5,068 children were separated from their families, with some being taken out of state and sent to shelters. With the proper levels of communication and a dedicated tracking system integrated with the NCMEC as well as state and local law enforcement, these issues can be minimized.

 

Psychological support describes the emotional toll that child separation can cause, and mentions the NCMEC’s multi-purpose call center that can be activated in an emergency and used to coordinate reunification. Additionally, grief counselors and trained mental health professionals able to address some of the non-physical injuries brought on by disasters.

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