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Why laptop runs hot and turns off or freezes?

Why laptop runs hot and turns off or freezes? | Lenovo Technical Support | Scoop.it

My laptop runs very hot and eventually turns off or freezes:–

 

this is one of the most common
complaints I have been receiving from my customer for many years. Why it’s
happening? Is there an easy fix for that?

Most likely this problem is heat related. Take a look at the following
picture.

 

Any laptop has a cooling module which consists of heatsink and cooling fan.
When laptop is working, the processor (CPU) heats up and because of that the
heatsink is getting hot too. At some temperature level, the fan kicks in and
cools down the heatsink.

 

The problem starts when the laptop cooling module collects too much dust
inside. Usually dust collects between the fan and heatsink. Dust clogs the
heatsink and kills normal airflow inside the cooling module. Eventually, the
processor gets very hot and the laptop turns off unexpectedly or freezes. This
problem can be fixed by cleaning the laptop cooling module.

Cleaning laptop cooling module.

 

Some laptops give you an easy access to the heatsink and fan. In laptops
like that you can access the cooling module through the bottom cover.

In my example I had to remove the cooling module. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be
able to remove the fan and access the heatsink. In some laptops you can remove
the fan without separating the heatsink from the CPU.

After I removed the fan, I found a thick layer of dust inside the heatsink.
Cleaning the heatsink should fix any heat related problems.

 

Apply thermal paste on the processor.

If thermal paste on the processor dried out, you should replace it with
fresh thermal paste.

 

Remove old thermal paste from the processor and heatsink using alcohol swab.

WARNING: In some laptops the heatsink also covers the
graphics chip. The part of the heatsink which covers the graphics chip might
have thermal pad on it instead of regular thermal paste. Do not replace thermal
pad with thermal paste! Do not apply thermal paste on the thermal pad! Just
leave thermal pad alone and apply thermal paste only on the processor.

I usually use Shin-Etsu thermal paste which is relatively cheap and performs
well.

 

What if cooling module cannot be accessed easily?

In some laptops the cooling module is buried deep inside the case and cannot
be easily accessed and removed. In order to remove the cooling module it’s
necessary to disassemble the whole laptop but it’s only for experienced users.

 

1. Blow air into the fan grill on the bottom of the laptop.

2. Blow air into the grill on the side of the laptop.

Switch direction a few times until all dust is gone. Most likely this quick
cleaning will fix your laptop overheating problem.

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Laptop Troubleshooting and Repair - Lenovo

Laptop Troubleshooting and Repair - Lenovo | Lenovo Technical Support | Scoop.it

Power
Failure

If your laptop doesn't turn on
when you hit the power button, the power system is a logical place to begin the
troubleshooting process. The laptop power system can be viewed as three
separate parts: The A/C adapter that gets plugged into a power outlet on one
end and into the laptop on the other end, the laptop motherboard or power
regulation daughter card that monitors and distributes power to the laptop
components, and the battery. The vast majority of laptops manufactured these
days can operate without the battery installed. In some cases, the
manufacturers will suggest that you remove the battery and store it somewhere
cool if using the laptop in one location for extended periods of time, as in
weeks or months.

One of the oddities about
troubleshooting laptop power failure as opposed to PC power failure is that the
battery gives the laptop an independent power system for as long as the charge
lasts. If the PC in your home is plugged into a bad power outlet or its power
strip is accidentally switched off you'll quickly figure out why. But if the
power strip gets turned off while you are operating your laptop, or a breaker
trips, or the local power grid suffers a brown out, you might not even notice
until the battery runs down. That's why it's important to not jump to
conclusions about laptop battery failures, and to try charging the battery
under different conditions before giving up and buying a new one. Just because
the battery didn't charge while the laptop was plugged in doesn't mean the
battery is bad.

Video
Failure

Assuming that the video processor
on the motherboard is working properly and sending the LCD instructions as to
which colors to allow through in which screen points (pixels), the most common
failure for laptop displays is a dead or intermittent inverter. When you can
only see a very, very faint image of your operating system desktop on the
screen, it means that the video system is working, but the LCD isn't getting
any backlighting. The usual culprit if you don't have an LED backlight is the
inverter, especially if you didn't note any strange tinting to the laptop
display in recent operation, but it's not easy for the do-it-yourselfer to
determine with 100% accuracy whether the failure is the CCFL lamp or the
inverter.

Some display problems aren't
difficult to troubleshoot at all. If you notice an inky stain slowly spreading
across your LCD over days or weeks that you can't wipe off, the LCD itself is
failing. Dead and stuck pixels often appear on LCDs over time causing point
failures in the display. There's nothing you can do to fix them, so just
tolerate them if possible. If the laptop is fairly new, the LCD may be under
warranty and the manufacturer normally has a specification for how many dead
pixels a LCD can accumulate before they have to repair it. Other physical
problems that may require LCD replacement are cracks and chips on the surface.
Horizontal or vertical lines or swathes of either a single color or dead pixels
usually mean the LCD will have to be replaced.

Laptop screen flickers between bright
and dim

Refurbishing a Lenovo Inspiron 1200, was missing its power
supply. I purchased another one from a third party and when I use it the
screen brightness goes from bright to dim rapidly, flickering. Now I know
what you're thinking, the power supply doesn't fit tight and the laptop keeps
going between battery power and outlet power. Here's the thing, it does this
for about 30 seconds to 1 minute (regardless of it sitting on a desk or a
lap), then stops. Occasionally it won't do it at all, sometimes it will do it
continuously. When it doesn't stop, turning it off with it plugged in then
turning it on fixes the problem. Also I've done a complete discharge and
recharge of the battery and it never has a problem recharging. This system
has been totally wiped clean and resinstalled with numerous OS's (windows and
linux). Any suggestions

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Laptop Troubleshooting and Repair - Lenovo

Laptop Troubleshooting and Repair - Lenovo | Lenovo Technical Support | Scoop.it

 Power Failure

 If your laptop doesn't turn on
 when you hit the power button, the power system is a logical place to begin the
 troubleshooting process. The laptop power system can be viewed as three
 separate parts: The A/C adapter that gets plugged into a power outlet on one
 end and into the laptop on the other end, the laptop motherboard or power
 regulation daughter card that monitors and distributes power to the laptop
 components, and the battery. The vast majority of laptops manufactured these
 days can operate without the battery installed. In some cases, the
 manufacturers will suggest that you remove the battery and store it somewhere
 cool if using the laptop in one location for extended periods of time, as in
 weeks or months.

 One of the oddities about
 troubleshooting laptop power failure as opposed to PC power failure is that the
 battery gives the laptop an independent power system for as long as the charge
 lasts. If the PC in your home is plugged into a bad power outlet or its power
 strip is accidentally switched off you'll quickly figure out why. But if the
 power strip gets turned off while you are operating your laptop, or a breaker
 trips, or the local power grid suffers a brown out, you might not even notice
 until the battery runs down. That's why it's important to not jump to
 conclusions about laptop battery failures, and to try charging the battery
 under different conditions before giving up and buying a new one. Just because
 the battery didn't charge while the laptop was plugged in doesn't mean the
 battery is bad.

 

Video Failure

Assuming that the video processor
on the motherboard is working properly and sending the LCD instructions as to
which colors to allow through in which screen points (pixels), the most common
failure for laptop displays is a dead or intermittent inverter. When you can
only see a very, very faint image of your operating system desktop on the
screen, it means that the video system is working, but the LCD isn't getting
any backlighting. The usual culprit if you don't have an LED backlight is the
inverter, especially if you didn't note any strange tinting to the laptop
display in recent operation, but it's not easy for the do-it-yourselfer to
determine with 100% accuracy whether the failure is the CCFL lamp or the
inverter.

 

Some display problems aren't
difficult to troubleshoot at all. If you notice an inky stain slowly spreading
across your LCD over days or weeks that you can't wipe off, the LCD itself is
failing. Dead and stuck pixels often appear on LCDs over time causing point
failures in the display. There's nothing you can do to fix them, so just
tolerate them if possible. If the laptop is fairly new, the LCD may be under
warranty and the manufacturer normally has a specification for how many dead
pixels a LCD can accumulate before they have to repair it. Other physical
problems that may require LCD replacement are cracks and chips on the surface.
Horizontal or vertical lines or swathes of either a single color or dead pixels
usually mean the LCD will have to be replaced.

Laptop screen flickers between bright
and dim

Refurbishing a Lenovo Inspiron 1200, was missing its power
supply. I purchased another one from a third party and when I use it the
screen brightness goes from bright to dim rapidly, flickering. Now I know
what you're thinking, the power supply doesn't fit tight and the laptop keeps
going between battery power and outlet power. Here's the thing, it does this
for about 30 seconds to 1 minute (regardless of it sitting on a desk or a
lap), then stops. Occasionally it won't do it at all, sometimes it will do it
continuously. When it doesn't stop, turning it off with it plugged in then
turning it on fixes the problem. Also I've done a complete discharge and
recharge of the battery and it never has a problem recharging. This system
has been totally wiped clean and resinstalled with numerous OS's (windows and
linux). Any suggestions

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Troubleshooting Laptop Hard Drive Failure

Troubleshooting Laptop Hard Drive Failure | Lenovo Technical Support | Scoop.it

Note that these steps correspond
with decision points on the flowchart and are reached through the interactive
diamond symbols. The text below cannot be read sequentially.

Is the LCD or monitor live? The
first step in troubleshooting hard drive problems is determining whether or not
you are dealing with a hard drive failure or something else entirely. Some
non-technical people will refer to the any computer part that isn't a monitor
as "the hard drive." If your LCD screen won't light up, the problem
almost certainly isn't related to the hard drive.

Return to
Diagnostic Chart

Does Windows or whatever
operating system you are using boot? Does the laptop start up normally, get you
all the way to the desktop? If the OS boots, unless you are dealing with a
noise issue, the problem you're having is either software related or an accumulation
of errors on the drive. If you're getting very flaky errors, having difficulty
when connected to the Internet, are seeing large scale file corruption or data
loss, the problem is more likely due to malware (bad software such as a
computer virus, spyware, trojans) than electronic or mechanical failure.
However, if the operating system disk maintenance software, such as ScanDisk,
is reporting errors every time you run it, if you see text messages about
"write failures" or if successive surface scans report a large number
of errors, your hard drive is actually failing. If you believe the hard drive
is failing, back-up all of the data that can be read and replace the drive.

Return to
Diagnostic Chart

Will the laptop boot with AC
power adapter attached? If the laptop boots up with the AC power adapter
plugged in, the problem is with the battery, not the hard drive. Proceed to the
battery troubleshooting flowchart. If you notice the hard drive performance
seems to degrade badly when you are running on battery power, it means the
power management is turning off the hard drive after too short of a delay on no
activity, probably just a minute or two. You can change the power management setting
to increase the shut-down delay for the hard drive or to ensure the hard drive
remains spun up as long as the laptop is turned on.

Return to
Diagnostic Chart

Does the laptop boot if you remove all external connections? If
you have any external devices plugged into your notebook, printers, cameras, PC
Cards (the replacement for PCMCIA cards), external keyboards or mice, network
cables, monitors, unplug them all. If the laptop is sitting in a docking
station, remove it. If the laptop boots when all of the external connections
are removed, the problem isn't the hard drive, it's a faulty external device or
signal. You can determine which device is preventing the OS from booting by process
of elimination. The problem isn't necessarily an hardware failure, it could be
the driver for that device is so unfriendly or corrupted that it's stalling the
boot process when called to manage it's client

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