Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers
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Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers
articles on online comments, cyberbullying, and slander by teachers and students
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Rulings stir harassment questions - Philadelphia Inquirer

Rulings stir harassment questions - Philadelphia Inquirer | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it
Rulings stir harassment questionsPhiladelphia Inquirer17, the US Supreme Court sent a decidedly mixed message: It would allow schools to punish students for peer harassment or bullying online, but not allow punishment for online harassment,...
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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 1:13 PM
This article is the most controversial I think of all the articles I found. On Jan. 17, the U.S. Supreme Court sent a decidedly mixed message: It would allow schools to punish students for peer harassment or bullying online, but not allow punishment for online harassment, denigration, and defamation of administrators. This basically opened the door for students to be able to post anything they wanted about their teachers, principals, and other school administrators onto the internet without any major fear of getting in trouble for it. The US supreme court needed to think this through more I believe because school administrators and teachers need to be protected to from harassment online too. Cyberbullying is cyberbullying no matter the age of the person being attacked. I like how the court thinks students against students is a problem but defaming teachers is just as big and needs to be stopped as well.
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Teacher Sues for Right to Say "N-----" in Class - ABC News

Teacher Sues for Right to Say "N-----" in Class - ABC News | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it
Daily MailTeacher Sues for Right to Say "N-----" in ClassABC NewsTwo weeks later, however, Mason called Brown into his office and accused him of misconduct, specifically abuse of language in front of students and other charges, Brown said.
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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 1:03 PM
In this article a teacher sues for the right to use the word Nigger in his classroom. This I would say is a slander word and follows with Chapter 6 ideas because slander can cause issues in schools as well. The teacher, Lincoln Brown, a sixth-grade writing and social studies teacher at Murray Language Academy, said he turned a bad classroom situation - in which one student wrote a rap calling another student a n***** - into "a teachable moment." I think the teacher was trying to make a statement and show his students how the slang word can be hurtful and is ultimantly a word to put down African American people. Trying to show students that the word shouldn't be used for fun or to call each other that, I think is a good thing and the teacher should be able to use the word in class to teach his students to not use the word and to put the meaning of the word into context.
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Law allows schools to tackle cyberbullying - Massillon Independent

Law allows schools to tackle cyberbullying - Massillon Independent | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it
Law allows schools to tackle cyberbullyingMassillon IndependentBy Erin Pustay School districts have the authority to crack down on bullying of all kinds now that Ohio has adopted a new law regarding cyberbullying.
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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 12:55 PM
In Ohio, the state has adopted a law to crack down on cyberbullying.The new legislation, which takes effect later this year, will require school districts to update their policies against bullying to include cyberbullying. In doing so, the law gives school districts more authority to deal with instances of cyberbullying that occur outside of school hours and school-sanctioned events. I think this is a great law as cyberbullying is a huge problem now with being in the technology age. This law will help with students saying posting slander about other students on the internet. students need to realize even if it is just on the interent that they are posting mean things about other students at school, that they can and will get in trouble for it and tha tit is against hte law now in Ohio.
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Ex-coach Nate Harris seeking $600000 payout from Tulsa Public Schools - Tulsa World

Ex-coach Nate Harris seeking $600000 payout from Tulsa Public Schools - Tulsa World | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it

Ex-coach/teacher Nate Harris seeking $600000 payout from TPSTulsa World

By Andrea Eger & Bill Braun World Staff Writers 

 

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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 12:34 PM
I felt this was a great article to include for this assignment, because Nate Harris is an ex teacher/coach. A lot of teachers both teach and coach sports at the school they work at. This article relates to chapter 6 in our teachers and law book because it is a classic example of teachers being able to sue other educators, including their superiors, for defamatory statements. Both teachers and administrators who make false statements that harm teachers' reputations are liable for defamation. In most situations it all comes down to whether a teacher or administrator was acting in good faith and had a qualified privilege to comment on matters that are within their scope of authority.
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College student's Facebook status reaches Minnesota Supreme Court - Marquette Tribune

College student's Facebook status reaches Minnesota Supreme Court - Marquette Tribune | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it
College student's Facebook status reaches Minnesota Supreme CourtMarquette Tribune“In this instance, however, the student's speech concerned an issue that is very sensitive — the handling of cadavers, bodies that families had donated to the university...
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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 1:09 PM
This case is very crazy and might not fully pertain to Chapter 6, but I thought it is very interesting. The case, involving former Minnesota mortuary science student Amanda Tatro, began in 2009 when Tatro posted Facebook status updates in which she nicknamed a cadaver “Bernie,” referencing a 1980s film, but also made threatening comments regarding the use of knives and laboratory tools in potentially stabbing an individual (who was later found to be Tatro’s ex-boyfriend). She was reported to her professor. the student claims the statements were sarcastic in nature and didn't mean anything. The student committee at the school ruled that the comments were disrespectful and that the student be placed on academic probation and also take a pych evaluation. This is a case where I think looking into it further is a good idea to make sure that the action taken against the student were right and just.
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Jury: Parent defamed Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary principal - Ocala

Jury: Parent defamed Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary principal - Ocala | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it
Jury: Parent defamed Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary principalOcalaHaldin said the six-person jury found Torrey guilty of libel since her statement was written.
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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 12:58 PM
In this article, a jury has ruled that a parent who filed numerous unsuccessful complaints and lawsuits against the School District defamed the character of Dr. N.H. Jones principal Don Raymond in 2008. This again is another classic example of a parent going great lengths to try and defame a school and school administrators name. This is a serious thing and Chapter 6 talks about how defamatory statements can be a major offense if proven in court.
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Teachers dismissed over online slurs begin tribunal challenge - Yorkshire Post

Teachers dismissed over online slurs begin tribunal challenge - Yorkshire Post | Legal Issues Regarding Slander and Libel That Affect Students and Teachers | Scoop.it

Teachers dismissed over online slurs begin tribunal challengeYorkshire PostTeacher Sandra Barnes and teaching assistant Sarah Carter were among four people sacked from Greenacre School in South Yorkshire in 2010 after comments on the popular social internet site Facebook.

 

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Lauryn Kristine's comment, February 25, 2012 12:39 PM
This article again is another example of teachers saying things about students that are shared with the public and come back to haunt them for saying it. these two teachers decided to poke fun at a special ed student on facebook. If teachers knowingly spread false gossip that harms a student's reputation, they can be found to have slandered the student. The only way a teacher can be found not guilty is if the teacher's statements are subject to a qualified privilege if they are made as part of the teacher's professional responsibilites. In this case posting about the student on facebook takes away that it was a teacher's professional responsibility.