Learning Theorists
1.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Learning Theorists
From Donald Clark's Plan B Blog
Curated by Ian Guest
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days

Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Why no heroes?
Over the next 50 days I plan to blog 50 separate pieces on learning theorists. Despite education and training’s central role in society, its intellectuals are not well known. Few can name more than a handful of candidates for the Hall of Fame. Unlike sport, politics, philosophy, literature, music, painting, film, business or science, learning practitioners have a sketchy idea of the contributions and theories of their intellectual leaders.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Gardner Multiple Intelligences or school subjects mirrored?

Gardner Multiple Intelligences or school subjects mirrored? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences is opposed to the idea of intelligence being a single measurable attribute. His is a direct attack on the practice of psychometric tests and behaviourism, relying more on genetic, instinctual and evolutionary arguments to build a picture of the mind. He also disputes the Piaget notion of fixed developmental stages, claiming that a child can be at various stages of development across different intelligences.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Honey & Mumford All styles no substance?

Honey & Mumford All styles no substance? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Learning styles theories, in general, have been diagnosed as being flaky and faddish. They have an intuitive appeal but, given the proliferation of these theories, with success based more on marketing than evidence, it is a largely discredited field. In practice, it tends to be a dodgy diagnosis without any real carry through to treatment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Bandler NLP: No Longer Plausible: training’s shameful, fraudulent cult?

Bandler NLP: No Longer Plausible: training’s shameful, fraudulent cult? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

NLP propelled itself into the heart of the training world. Yet NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) has little to do with serious neuroscience or linguistics, and is not taken seriously by academics in either field

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Calvin (1509-1564) teachers as preachers, sin ...

Calvin (1509-1564) teachers as preachers, sin ... | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Calvin’s influence on education through universal schooling has been immense, as is his influence on attitudes towards education as a deficit model, where the students are seen from the start as a flawed creatures. This led to methods of teaching that are only now being re-examined. In a sense Calvin has been a curse and a blessing, with his emphasis on the virtues of education combined with the vices of, for example, teachers as preachers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Bloom (1913-1999) one e-learning paper you must read plus his taxonomy of learning

Bloom (1913-1999) one e-learning paper you must read plus his taxonomy of learning | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Bloom is far better known for his hugely influential classification of learning behaviours and provided concrete measures for identifying different levels of learning. His taxonomy includes three overlapping domains;

Cognitive (knowledge)

Psychomotor (skills)

Affective (attitude)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Gagne (1916 - 2002) Universal recipe for learning (9 steps)

Gagne (1916 - 2002) Universal recipe for learning (9 steps) | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Gagne was one an early learning theorists who provided some simple and practical advice on instructional design, which in some way accounts for his success. Although his instructional model is not applicable to all types of learning, and can be seen as a restriction, he brought a certain method to design which produced lots of solid learning experiences and content.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Kandel (1929 - ) Nobel Prize winning learning theorist

Kandel (1929 - ) Nobel Prize winning learning theorist | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Learning, for Kandel, is the ability to acquire new ideas from experience and retain them as memories (a simple fact often overlooked).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Baddeley (1934) complexity of ‘working’ memory

Baddeley (1934) complexity of ‘working’ memory | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Working memory is the door through which all learning must enter, so it is important to know what it is and its limitations. Baddeley looked specifically at ‘encoding’. to unpack what he called ‘working memory’ to replace the previous, simpler ‘short-term’ memory model. This is important as a working knowledge of ‘working’ memory can lead to better teaching and learning. By designing material which is optimised for getting through working memory to long-term memory, significant improvements are theoretically possible.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Miller (1920 - ) Magic number 7 plus & minus 2 - chunking

Miller (1920 - ) Magic number 7 plus & minus 2 - chunking | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Miller started by identifying relevant studies that show we remember ‘chunks’ of information. But what is a ‘chunk’? We can remember, on average, seven randomised numbers but only six letters and four or five words. Miller’s solution was to posit clusters of chunks e.g. a word is a cluster of letters, a phrase a cluster of words. But Miller’s definition proved inadequate. This problem, that we remember different types of content differently giving variable sizes of chunks, was to open up a whole field of experimental work that began to reveal how short-term memory works. The concept of a ‘chunk’ has proved enduring and useful in memory research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Donald Clark Plan B: Ignatius (1401-1556) Jesuit zeal, Latin and child-abuse

Donald Clark Plan B: Ignatius (1401-1556) Jesuit zeal, Latin and child-abuse | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

The primary function of education for the Jesuits was religion, specifically the teachings of the Catholic Church, so that moral character and religious devotion became habitual. This was not done through direct religious instruction but through a religious approach to all learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Confucius (551-479BC) 2500 years of order, state, meritocratic assessment

Confucius (551-479BC) 2500 years of order, state, meritocratic assessment | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Like Plato and Aristotle, Confucius had his own school, started in 552BC. Despite a period of exile, like Freire, he became a very influential official and adviser but it was through his four texts, especially The Analects, that he has had an immense and constant influence on education in the China and the East over an astonishing 2500 years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Donald Clark Plan B: Seymour Papert – Logo, Lego and constructionism - RIP

Donald Clark Plan B: Seymour Papert – Logo, Lego and constructionism - RIP | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Kirkpatrick 4-levels of evaluation: Happy sheets? Surely past its sell-by date?

Kirkpatrick 4-levels of evaluation: Happy sheets? Surely past its sell-by date? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Kirkpatrick has for decades been the only game in town in the evaluation of training, although hardly known in education. In his early Techniques for evaluation training programmes (1959) and Evaluating training programmes: The four levels (1994), he proposed a standard approach to the evaluation of training that became a de facto standard.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Eysenck (1916-1997) Bad ass of assessment?

Eysenck (1916-1997) Bad ass of assessment? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

IQ theorists like Eysenck tended to focus on logical and mathematical skills, to the detriment of other abilities, leading some to conclude that education has been over-academic. This, they argue, has led to a serious skew on curricula, assessment and the funding of education to the detriment of vocational and other skills

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Fleming VAKuous learning styles?

Fleming VAKuous learning styles? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Despite reports funded but Government, academic institutions and professional psychologists, decrying learning styles theory, and VAK in particular, it persists across the learning world, promulgated by poor teacher training and ‘train the trainer’ courses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Seligman (1942 - ) Pied-piper of ‘positive’ psychology but at expense of realism?

Seligman (1942 - ) Pied-piper of ‘positive’ psychology but at expense of realism? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Seligman’s work has led to a re-examination of the purpose of education, training and social aims beyond their tendency to focus on deficit models. The well-being of the person and learner has been brought into the equation, with sensitivity around positive traits and the teaching of social and emotional skills beyond the academic curriculum.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Maslow (1908 - 1970) Hierarchy of needs. 5 or 7 levels? Useful or useless?

Maslow (1908 - 1970) Hierarchy of needs. 5 or 7 levels? Useful or useless? | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Maslow has been almost omnipresent in education and training. However, it is not clear that his theory has had any real effect in real education and training.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Kolb - Experience & learning: a 4 stage cycle, also learning styles (doomed to succeed!)

Kolb - Experience & learning: a 4 stage cycle, also learning styles (doomed to succeed!) | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Kolb is a refreshing alternative to the overemphasis on academic, knowledge-based learning and the idea of cyclical learning informed by experience is sound, as is the importance of formative experiences themselves in learning.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Mager – Mr learning objectives. In this course you will…..yawn, yawn!

Mager – Mr learning objectives. In this course you will…..yawn, yawn! | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

His aim was to produce a more rigorous and precise approach to the design of learning experiences based on competences and assessment that relate to defined learning or performance objectives.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Tulving (1927 - ) Cue memory: episodic & semantic memories and, encoding

Tulving (1927 - ) Cue memory: episodic & semantic memories and, encoding | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Endel Tulving, in 1972, made an important distinction in our long-term memory between episodic memory (remembered experiences and events in time and space) and semantic memory (facts, ideas, concepts, rules independent of time and space). This was largely based on an analysis of internal memory states, and the experimental testing of memories, an anathema to pure behaviourists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Atkinson & Shiffrin - three-stage model of memory (sensory, STM, LTM)

Atkinson & Shiffrin - three-stage model of memory (sensory, STM, LTM) | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

As memory research moved away from the purely behaviourist, stimulus- response (S-R) model, and its offspring the stimulus- organism -response (S-O-R) model towards information processing, psychologists started to think of memory in term of information processing. This proved to be useful in determining models for memory, models that could be tested in laboratory experiments. Although distinctions between different types of memory had been present in the literature, Atkinson & Schiffrin, in 1968, laid down the first solid schema for memory that acted as a solid foundation for further research and refinement.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Ebbinghaus (1850-1909) memory genius: forgetting curve, spaced practice, primacy & recency

Ebbinghaus (1850-1909) memory genius: forgetting curve, spaced practice, primacy & recency | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Hermann Ebbinghaus published a landmark book in 1885, Uber das Gedachtis (On Memory), translated into English in 1913. In this he put the study of memory on a sure, scientific footing using rigorous experiments, exploring retention and the effects of sequencing and patterns of practice on memory. Indeed, most subsequent research into learning and memory has been footnotes to his work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

Black & Wiliam Don’t praise the child! Formative feedback is key to better learning.

Black & Wiliam Don’t praise the child! Formative feedback is key to better learning. | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

Feedback is seen as a key feature of good teaching, yet precise research and theory is hard to find. Black and Wiliam published a well-researched and influential paper, Inside the Black Box, that recommended methods of feedback, making it more focused and potent. William claims that this is the sweet spot in improving productivity in schools, even beyond lower class sizes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ian Guest
Scoop.it!

White (1934 - ) What is education for? Autonomy

White (1934 - ) What is education for? Autonomy | Learning Theorists | Scoop.it

What is education for? This key question still elicits puzzled looks, ill-formed answers, even platitudes, from students, parents, policy makers and even learning professionals. Few can fully articulate the purpose of education.

more...
No comment yet.