Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion
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Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion
Featured articles with news and opinions on the world of teaching and learning.
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Lesson Study: The power of three - SecEd

The Japanese Lesson Study approach to teacher enquiry is gaining popularity in the UK. The technique sees three teachers working collaboratively to tackle specific barriers to learning. David Weston explains.
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Challenging Work Is Essential to Deep, Meaningful Learning

Challenging Work Is Essential to Deep, Meaningful Learning | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
Pushing students to go beyond what they think they can do is at the core of good teaching. Challenging tasks keep students engaged and curious to learn more, driving their learning to new depths.
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Making science interesting : Primary

What works in primary science education...

 

Factors that were effective in promoting high achievement in the schools visited were:

accurate evaluation of science outcomes leading to effective improvement strategiesmaking science interestingassessment for learningeffective differentiationsupport for learning beyond lessonstime for learners to develop science practical skills.

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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know - TeachThought

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know - TeachThought | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change. 

 

The human brain.

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Matt Damon: ‘Why Would You Cut Out Educators When You’re Designing Education Policy?"

Matt Damon: ‘Why Would You Cut Out Educators When You’re Designing Education Policy?" | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

"Matt Damon just had an online conversation with Reddit users and he touched on a number of topics, including his opposition to standardized test-based school reform and the exclusion of teachers from the shaping of education policy.

 

He states, 'My mom’s a professor and she’s become increasingly concerned, as have a lot of teachers, about the way policy is being designed in this country. It’s being designed by a bunch of people who aren’t teachers. I’ve always believed that they have to invite teachers into the discussion to help design policy. We would never let business men design warheads, why would you cut out educators when you’re designing education policy? 

 

I think that far too much emphasis has been put on these tests. You’re going to get teachers teaching to the test and you’re not actually giving them the leeway to do their jobs. People get tired of hearing about Finland, but they do it better than anyone, and when you look at how, it’s very simple. They have very highly trained teachers. Fifty percent of teachers here quit within five years.


Via Todd Reimer
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Are Your Students Engaged? Don’t Be So Sure

Are Your Students Engaged? Don’t Be So Sure | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

The revered Indian philosopher and educator, Sri Aurobindo, knew a thing or two about engagement. His three principles for learning still serve as an important guide in designing engaging learning:

Nothing can be “taught” — engagement precedes learning, so students need to actively buy in to their learning, in order to bring discretionary activity to the process (that is, above and beyond the required outcomes)The mind must be consulted in its own growth. Activities need to personally matter to students, tapping in to their values and passions.Work from the near to the far. Make activities relevant to the world students inhabit, but build in intellectual stretch to take them beyond their cognitive “comfort zone.”

So, we know engagement can’t be done to students; we are realizing its importance in improving the life-chances of some of our poorer students; we now know it’s a lot more than just compliance.

 
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Invest in minds not maths to boost the economy - opinion - 23 December 2013 - New Scientist

Invest in minds not maths to boost the economy - opinion - 23 December 2013 - New Scientist | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Instead of trying to educate more scientists or engineers to drive innovation, we should focus on turning out agile thinkers, says Michael Brooks.

 

The ability to process, synthesise and communicate information efficiently is the premium skill of the future. We shouldn't be surprised: it was the premium skill of the past too. John Maynard Keynes once stated that what made Isaac Newton great was his ability to focus on a problem until he had thought his way through it. "I fancy his pre-eminence is due to his muscles of intuition being the strongest and most enduring with which a man has ever been gifted," he said.

 

When he chose to, Newton was also great at communicating ideas. The same can't be said of most STEM graduates: a 2011 UK government study reported the moans of employers that they often lacked communication and organisational skills as well as the ability to manage their time or work in a team.

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Kids Want to Know: How Is Science Relevant?

Kids Want to Know: How Is Science Relevant? | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
In a new poll, many parents said they're worried that schools aren't adequately preparing students for a changing workforce.
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Smithsonian Science Education Center - Science Assessment: the Next Generation

Smithsonian Science Education Center - Science Assessment: the Next Generation | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

The NGSS fuse disciplinary core ideas (facts and concepts within a discipline), practices (skills like argumentation and using models), and crosscutting concepts (ideas that apply across all scientific disciplines) into intertwined performance expectations (PEs). These PEs can be described as statements of “blended knowledge”.

 

Past assessments have typically only targeted subject-specific facts and concepts. How can we develop assessment tasks that accurately and usefully measure blended knowledge?

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The EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic

The EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
The Must-Have EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic.
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Beyond Student Engagement: Achieving a State of Flow

Beyond Student Engagement: Achieving a State of Flow | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

"Think about a time when you were really engaged in something, the kind of engagement where you lose track of time and experience feelings of joy and satisfaction. You may have felt acutely focused, physically, mentally, and emotionally absorbed in a task.

 

I've felt this most often while writing, reading, teaching, and coaching -- always signaled by the moment when I notice the clock and, feeling dazed, wonder where the hours have gone. The feelings are pleasant and there are always outcomes, a chapter written, or a complicated dilemma unraveled, for example.

 

It wasn't until I heard about the work of the Hungarian psychologist, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, that I learned that this notion has a name: Flow. 


Via Todd Reimer
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Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American

Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is a teachable skill best taught outside the K–12 classroom
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Tech to help foster science vocations early | Euroscientist Webzine

Tech to help foster science vocations early | Euroscientist Webzine | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
In my experience of developing the eduvee educational multimedia and social platform for secondary school education in the UK, I have noticed that many of the today’s school age students would not consider a career in science. However, if you ask pupils if they want to work for a Facebook, Google or Apple, they would jump at the chance. What can be done? And what is going wrong? Our classroom research shows that it is often difficult for students to make the connection between theory and the relevance to them. For example, if we consider a typical question from a student: “Miss, why do I need to know about the physics of mechanics?” A good question. All the teacher needs to do is to explain that Angry Birds—one of the most popular games ever in the app store—is based on motion of projectiles. This provides the “aha” moment for the student and shows how projectiles are relevant and the game itself encourages scientific experimentation.
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How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information?

How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information? | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Perhaps one of the most powerful expectations of students in an environment of scarcity is that they not question the source of the information. As the modern classroom has become connected, the amount of information available to both teachers and students has exponentially increased. Where teachers once lectured about important ideas and events, or shared their acquired knowledge with their students, today’s classrooms can see every key primary source document, the actual notes of great scientists, and a limitless amount of literary criticism. For students, this abundance of information means not only a changing role from the traditional classroom, but also a drastically different set of skills and expectations.

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EducationInvestor - Article: Bouncing back

EducationInvestor - Article: Bouncing back | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Interactive whiteboard (IWB) firms have been one of the great anti-success stories of the last five years. If you’d invested $1,000 (£610) in Smart Technologies, the Canadian IWB firm, when it first hit the stock exchange in July 2010, you’d now have the princely sum of $126. Since its own IPO the previous March, Promethean stock, too, has lost seven-eighths of its value. Revenues at both firms have plummeted. People just weren’t buying whiteboards in the quantities they were.

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10 Amazing Jobs You Could Land With the Right STEM Education

10 Amazing Jobs You Could Land With the Right STEM Education | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
Science, technology, engineering and math have earned a "nerdy" reputation, but these jobs are proof that STEM is a killer career choice.

 

When you think of someone who codes, you might picture a person hunched over a laptop in a dark garage. But that was the stereotype of yesteryear. Today, STEM careers have taken on a wildly different perception, and some of the coolest jobs around require a background in science, technology, engineering and math. After all, someone had to build and program all of the apps and gadgets you can't live without, right?

 

Below, we highlight 10 cool STEM jobs you should be jealous of.

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The Problem With Thinking ‘Content Is King’ In Education

The Problem With Thinking ‘Content Is King’ In Education | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

"For decades, in science, math, and history policymakers, researchers, teacher educators, practitioners, and parents have argued over what kind of content should be taught in classrooms, playing down the inevitable presence of pedagogy or how the subject should be taught.

 

Well-intentioned but uninformed, these reformers have ignored how knotted and twisted together they are. Knowing content is one strand and how to teach it is the other. 

 

Recently, educational researchers have acknowledged this age-old marriage by calling it 'pedagogical content knowledge.' They have expanded it to include knowledge of how students learn, the context in which teaching occurs, and other areas. Alas, this idea has yet to crack the mindset of reform-minded policymakers.


Via Todd Reimer
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Poverty school failure link 'a myth'

Poverty school failure link 'a myth' | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

There is nothing inevitable about the weaker academic performance of poorer pupils, says an analysis of Pisa tests by the OECD's Andreas Schleicher.

 

Mr Schleicher, who runs the tests, says the high results of deprived pupils in some Asian countries shows what poor pupils in the UK could achieve.

The most disadvantaged pupils in Shanghai match the maths test results of wealthy pupils in the UK.

 

Mr Schleicher says it "debunks the myth that poverty is destiny".

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How Do Parents Think ‘Educational’ Screen Time Affects Learning?

How Do Parents Think ‘Educational’ Screen Time Affects Learning? | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it
TV is still very much king of media in most homes. Kids watch way more educational TV — an average of 42 minutes a day — than they interact with other educational content, like mobile devices (5 minutes), computers (5 minutes) or video games (3 minutes).
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Has the ‘MOOC Revolution’ Drifted Off Course?

Has the ‘MOOC Revolution’ Drifted Off Course? | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

If 2012 was the “Year of the MOOC,” as The New York Times famously called it, 2013 might be dubbed the year that online education fell back to earth. Faculty at several institutions rebelled against the rapid expansion of online learning — and the nation’s largest MOOC providers are responding.

 

A recent University of Pennsylvania studyconfirmed a massive problem: MOOCs have painfully few active users. About half who registered for a class ever viewed a lecture, and completion rates averaged just 4 percent across all courses.

 

What was missing, many students complained, was a human connection beyond the streamed lecture.

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Ten Most Popular Educational YouTube Videos in 2013

Ten Most Popular Educational YouTube Videos in 2013 | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Check out YouTube's top trending educational videos in 2013.


Mostly from asapScience and minutephysics.

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Education in Finland: Pisa isn't the full story

Education in Finland: Pisa isn't the full story | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Despite Finnish education's strong performance in Pisa, it isn't all perfect – science and maths standards are declining and top-performing students aren't being pushed enough.

 

To address these fault lines, we should maximise the use of the possibilities of technology in the classroom. Studies have shown that theuse of tablet computers in the classroom improves learning, while some video games have been shown to improve brain function.

 

More use of the flipped classroom model, where instruction is delivered online and homework is moved into the classroom, allows students to learn at their own pace. It would also allow us to economise the expensive resource of teacher time for direct interaction with students. Another benefit is that instruction is given by those best qualified in a given subject.

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11 Foreign Policies That Could Transform American Schools

11 Foreign Policies That Could Transform American Schools | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

"We learned the results of the latest PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) last week, and American students performed the same on the well-regarded international exam as they have for the past ten years -- completely stagnant, smack dab in the middle of the spectrum. They scored slightly above average in reading, average in science and below average in math. Meanwhile, students in the Chinese province, Shanghai, dominated the exam, earning the top spot in all three categories. It could be time for our country to look at some of the specific protocols and methods that top-performing countries are using to educate their children. Here, we have highlighted 11 education policies from highly-ranked countries that seem to be working for them. Read up America, it's time to take some notes." | by Renee Jacques 


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Beyond Student Engagement: Achieving a State of Flow

Beyond Student Engagement: Achieving a State of Flow | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Csikszentmihalyi has identified three conditions necessary to achieve a state of flow:


The goals are clear (i.e. design an experiment which demonstrates xyz, write a persuasive essay, paint the ceiling of the chapel)The goals are attainable and within one's skillset and ability; and the challenge level and skill level are both highYou get clear and immediate feedback so you can adjust your course
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How the Power of Interest Drives Learning

How the Power of Interest Drives Learning | Learning, Teaching and Classroom Theory and Opinion | Scoop.it

Interest is at once a cognitive state and an affective state, what Silvia calls a “knowledge emotion.” The feelings that characterize interest are overwhelmingly positive: a sense of being energized and invigorated, captivated and enthralled. As for its effects on cognition: interest effectively turbocharges our thinking. When we’re interested in what we’re learning, we pay closer attention; we process the information more efficiently; we employ more effective learning strategies, such as engaging in critical thinking, making connections between old and new knowledge, and attending to deep structure instead of surface features.

 

The great educator John Dewey wrote that interest operates by a process of “catch” and “hold”—first the individual’s interest must be captured, and then it must be maintained. The approach required to catch a person’s interest is different from the one that’s necessary to hold a person’s interest: catching is all about seizing the attention and stimulating the imagination.

 

The research of Paul Silvia suggests that to be interesting, material must be novel,complex, and comprehensible. That means introducing ourselves or others to things we haven’t encountered before (or novel aspects of familiar things), and calibrating their complexity so that these things are neither too hard nor too easy to understand.

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