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ICT teacher takeover: a week to discuss computer science and ICT in schools

ICT teacher takeover: a week to discuss computer science and ICT in schools | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
"What happens when an ICT teacher is let loose on the Guardian Teacher Network? You get a whole week dedicated to exploring the subject." - "The teaching of ICT, now computing, has always entailed organic changes to the subject from year to year. Since the wholesale shift in focus towards computing, however, the future heralds even greater upheaval. There are few who doubt the importance of ICT, but how it fits into schools is open for debate. It is without doubt that teachers of ICT are daunted by all these changes. As such, we have devoted this week to helping you implement the adjustments and the arguments that surround them. The week opens with a great piece from Miles Berry and Chris Leach. Each of them tackle the subject change from different positions, do you agree with Miles that computer science 'provides a unique lens through which to understand the world'? Or do you stand with Chris that 'changing the name of the subject from ICT to computing is limiting the subject and would narrow our curriculum'?"
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WE KNOW WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT - The Boston Globe

WE KNOW WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT - The Boston Globe | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
He will be a man, or maybe still a boy.

He will have a semiautomatic rifle — an AR-15, or something like it — and several high-capacity magazines filled with ammunition.
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America, what is left of it, is slipping away - It's like F.D.R. doing nothing in response to Pearl Harbor

America, what is left of it, is slipping away - It's like F.D.R. doing nothing in response to Pearl Harbor | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"Donald Trump has turned the political world upside down, again and again, like a kid flipping a coin. Every day we wake up to either a new scandal or several lingering ones. 


It is astounding. It is maddening. It is numbing. 


At this moment, he is embroiled in a scandal of a six-figure payment to a porn star who goes by the name Stormy Daniels and who, at one point, gave an interview in which she claimed that the two were engaged in an extramarital sexual affair. 


He is also embroiled in a scandal over why a top aide, Rob Porter, accused of physically assaulting his two ex-wives, was allowed to remain on the White House staff even after these allegations had been brought to the attention of the White House by the F.B.I. 


Exacerbating this scandal is the fact that the official White House timeline about the events leading to Porter’s resignation turned out to be a lie, according to sworn testimony on Tuesday by the F.B.I. director Christopher Wray. It is also exacerbated by the fact that after Porter resigned, Trump praised him, and initially failed to say anything about domestic violence in general, reserving that condemnation for a week later, when he said, “I’m totally opposed to domestic violence of any kind.” 


And of course, there is the omnipresent issue of Russia attacking our elections in 2016 and the investigation into whether anyone in the Trump orbit colluded or cooperated with the Russians, conspired to commit a crime, lied to officers or tried to obstruct justice. 


That’s just the big three at the moment. We also mustn’t forget that the president has never released his tax returns, he refused to sever ties with his businesses, and he is burning through our money going to golf courses or his properties with decadent regularity. He also defended Nazis and was disrespectful to the hurricane-ravaged people of Puerto Rico. 


And Trump has lied about pretty much everything. As The Washington Post reported in November: “In the past 35 days, Trump has averaged an astonishing nine [false or misleading] claims a day. The total now stands at 1,628 claims in 298 days, or an average of 5.5 claims a day.” 


Any of this would have crippled another president, but not Trump. In a perverse way, Trump appears to benefit from the sheer volume of his offenses. They overwhelm many Americans’ ability to process and track, maintain outrage or even fact-check. 


This may rightfully be called Trump’s Deluge Doctrine of American Politics, a thing that many of us never properly feared because we never thought it possible. We never thought a man of such moral depravity and such little respect for propriety, protocol and honesty would ever be president. 


But the storm is upon us; we are in it. 


I must continue to submit that although I disagree vociferously with Trump on policy, my objection here isn’t about policy or partisanship. This is a fight for the soul of the country. 


When more than a third of the country — among them many who once considered themselves part of the “moral majority” — stand with a man who is the literal antithesis of all the values they once professed, that is a problem for America. They are no longer interested in the health of the democracy. Their mission and objectives have veered into a dark place where vision is short and risks and dangers are multiple. 


I know that it is a fool’s errand to try to convince these people that honesty, valor and character are fundamental requirements of the American presidency, and when they are lost from the office, the country itself is in peril. 


As Trump himself said during the campaign, “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters.” The enduring truth of that outrageous claim is a permanent stain that his supporters must carry. 


These people are not only hypocrites; they are au pairs to his obscenity. 


Who else would they have allowed to get away with paying off a porn star? 


Who else would they have allowed to refuse to sufficiently acknowledge that the country had been attacked, with profound consequences and continued threat, by another country? 


The director of national intelligence, Dan Coats, said Tuesday at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing: 


“There should be no doubt that Russia perceived that its past efforts as successful and views the 2018 U.S. midterm elections as a potential target for Russian midterm operations.” 


He continued: 


“We need to inform the American public that this is real, that this is going to be happening, and the resilience needed for us to stand up and say we’re not going to allow some Russian to tell us how to vote, how we ought to run our country.” 


But Wray testified at the same hearing that he had never been “specifically directed by the president” to prevent Russia from interfering in our elections. 


That is a jaw-dropping statement. As the Harvard professor of constitutional law Laurence H. Tribe wrote on Twitter: 


“F.B.I. director Wray just testified in the Senate that — despite Russia’s ongoing intrusions into our electoral systems — Potus has never charged the F.B.I. with protecting U.S. elections from Russia! Let that sink in. That’d be like F.D.R. doing nothing in response to Pearl Harbor.” 


Let me be clear: Any president who refuses to protect Americans from a foreign threat is himself a domestic threat. 


How can any of this be sustained? How can it be rationalized? How can it be tolerated? 


America, what is left of it, is slipping away a little bit more every day, with a blessing and a wave from the truculent Trump supporters who simply get giddy whenever liberals lament. 


This is the politics of the petty, where people dance and shout as the republic burns. 


We patriots and dissidents, we many, we strong, we steadfast, are the last hope the country has of returning to what remains of a pre-Trump America, where porn stars weren’t paid off, accused wife beaters weren’t valorized and our president showed more allegiance to our country than to another."

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50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968

50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
It was a violent year. Liberals reeled, a war dragged on and protests raged. People got all their news from radio, TV and newspapers. But what if they’d had phones vibrating with modern news alerts?
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Our Top 13 Predictions For Science in 2018

Our Top 13 Predictions For Science in 2018 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
The world of science is unpredictable and ever-changing, but as a team that writes about science day in, day out, we can't help but notice certain trends in research.

So this year - which also happens to be ScienceAlert's 10th anniversary - we thought we'd try our hand at predicting some of the big science news of 2018 before they happen for once. You know, just so we can tell you we told you so later.


Most of these are based on well-established science, a few are wildly speculative, and some are just blatantly obvious. Don't email us if any of them don't come true.

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Maureen Corrigan Picks Books To Close Out A Chaotic 2017

Maureen Corrigan Picks Books To Close Out A Chaotic 2017 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

"For a chaotic year, I'm offering a chaotic "Best Books" list — but I think my list is chaotic in a good sense. These books zing off in all directions: They're fresh, unruly and dismissive of the canned and contrived.


Sing, Unburied, Sing
by Jesmyn Ward


Jesmyn Ward's gorgeous and bleak novel, Sing, Unburied, Sing, takes readers on the great American road trip. But unlike Jack Kerouac's carefree roadster, Ward's junker is loaded down with a baby in a car seat, a couple of ghosts, a package of crystal meth and the oppressive weight of racism — past and present.
A host of narrators take turns telling this tale, but the most compelling voice belongs to Jojo, a 13-year-old biracial boy who's forced to grow up too fast; in the process, he comes to a deeper understanding of how he's valued — or used — by members of his family."

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The Best Science Books Of 2017

The Best Science Books Of 2017 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
It’s been a bumpy road for science in 2017, and now’s a good time to reflect on what makes science so great: Stories of discovery and wonder, and the majesty of nature and space. From women codebreakers during WWII, to Oliver Sacks on consciousness, to a graphic novel about theoretical physics, there’s something for everyone on this year’s list of best science books. Maria Popova, founder of Brain Pickings, and Deborah Blum, director of the Knight Science Journalism program, join Ira to wrap up the best science books of 2017. Check out their picks below.
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Happy Holidays: Seasonal Suggestions for What to Read, Watch, Write About, Create and Debate

Happy Holidays: Seasonal Suggestions for What to Read, Watch, Write About, Create and Debate | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Merry Christmas, happy Hanukkah, joyous Kwanzaa and happy New Year.

Here are some of our favorite recent Times articles, essays, photo slide shows, videos and graphics to help you celebrate the season, whether in the classroom or at home. We’ll continue to update this list throughout December to help you look back at the year that was — and forward to the year that will be.

The Learning Network is taking a break from Dec. 23 through Jan. 1, but we wish you peace and joy, family and friends, gingerbread houses and festive playlists, ugly sweaters and beautiful moments to melt even the humbuggiest heart.
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Stories about Climate Change

“As the next round of international climate talks kicks off Monday in Bonn, Germany, many of the headlines will focus on what role the Trump administration will play in these negotiations — especially since President Trump has vowed to leave the Paris climate agreement by 2020.


But there’s a much deeper problem looming over these talks. None of the world’s major industrialized nations are yet doing anything close to what’s needed to avoid drastic global warming in the decades ahead. Not the United States. Not Europe. Not Canada. Not Japan.


As we show in an article published today, there’s a large gap between what countries are currently doing to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and what they promised to do in Paris in 2015.

That’s not all: There’s an even larger gap between what they promised in Paris and what scientists say is needed to keep the world below 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, the threshold that world leaders have agreed is unacceptably risky. The charts by my colleague Nadja Popovich make this gap stark.”

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Stress, hostility rising in American high schools in Trump era, new UCLA report finds

Stress, hostility rising in American high schools in Trump era, new UCLA report finds | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Student anxiety and hostility on public high school campuses has worsened since Donald Trump became president and is affecting student learning, according to a new UCLA report.

More than half of public high school teachers in a nationally representative school sample reported seeing more students than ever with “high levels of stress and anxiety” between last January, when Trump took office, and May. That’s according to the study, “Teaching and Learning in the Age of Trump: Increasing Stress and Hostility in America’s High Schools,” by John Rogers, director of the Institute for Democracy, Education and Access at the University of California at Los Angeles.

“I’ve never been in a school year where I’ve had so many kids, kind of on edge,” the report quoted a Utah social studies teacher as saying. The names of the teachers in the report were pseudonyms.

And nearly 80 percent said some students had expressed concern for their well-being because of the charged public conversation about issues such as immigration, health care, the environment, travel bans and LGBTQ rights, it said. Furthermore, 40 percent said concerns over key issues — such as Trump’s ban on travelers from eight countries, most with Muslim majorities; restrictions on LGBTQ rights; and health care — are making it harder for students to focus on their studies and making them less likely to come to school.
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A Fire Story, COMPLETE

A Fire Story, COMPLETE | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
This is A Fire Story. Today's Part 2 is below, but I also reposted Friday's Part 1 so the complete story would be together in one place.

Which is not to say I won't do more, depending on what else happens.

It's much less polished than my usual work, but that's part of the point. Writing, penciling and inking an 18-page comic like this would normally take me a few weeks. I did this over parts of four days using a bad brush pen and art supplies from Target--Sharpie pens, highlighters and crummy paper--because Target was the only open store I could find within 20 miles.

It's a first-person report from the front line. They're not always pretty.

Page 9 has some profanity. Actually, it has nothing but profanity. Sorry. I wrestled with that, but that's exactly the way it happened and I am an honest reporter.

My family, pets and I are all fine--a lot better off than many others. There's not a person in the county who hasn't been touched by this disaster. Karen and I know at least a hundred people burned out of their homes, including a lot of cops, firefighters, and government staff who've been working hard for others all week.

A Fire Story has drawn a lot of readers, Facebook comments and shares, and other attention. I appreciate that deeply. Thanks.

We'll be fine. I'll keep you posted as we rebuild.
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Teen Anxiety On The Rise

Teen Anxiety On The Rise | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Teenage life can be stressful. Anxious. We know it. We get it. But in the last decade, the number of American teens reporting "overwhelming anxiety" has surged. For some, it's just a lousy feeling. For others, it's debilitating. Paralyzing. Severe anxiety. So why? Some look at the world now and say, "Why not? Look around!" Others point to social media, or parenting that may be too quick to protect. This hour, On Point: More American teens, more anxious than ever, and what to do about it.
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Andres Gomez's curator insight, October 20, 2017 2:39 AM
This phenomeno is not just in United States, it is happening around the world in many countries because teens are involve in different complicated situations where they are taking part. That problem comes from diverse points such as TV, Social networks and a paradigmatical way of life where young people do not enjoy their stages of the life.
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20 of America's top political scientists gathered to discuss our democracy. They're scared.

20 of America's top political scientists gathered to discuss our democracy. They're scared. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Is American democracy in decline? Should we be worried?

On October 6, some of America’s top political scientists gathered at Yale University to answer these questions. And nearly everyone agreed: American democracy is eroding on multiple fronts — socially, culturally, and economically.

The scholars pointed to breakdowns in social cohesion (meaning citizens are more fragmented than ever), the rise of tribalism, the erosion of democratic norms such as a commitment to rule of law, and a loss of faith in the electoral and economic systems as clear signs of democratic erosion.

No one believed the end is nigh, or that it’s too late to solve America’s many problems. Scholars said that America’s institutions are where democracy has proven most resilient. So far at least, our system of checks and balances is working — the courts are checking the executive branch, the press remains free and vibrant, and Congress is (mostly) fulfilling its role as an equal branch.

But there was a sense that the alarm bells are ringing.

Yascha Mounk, a lecturer in government at Harvard University, summed it up well: “If current trends continue for another 20 or 30 years, democracy will be toast.”
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Interpersonal Skills and Today's Job Market

Interpersonal Skills and Today's Job Market | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Teachers know all too well the collective groan associated with announcing a group project. Endless gripes and grievances can follow — “But he’s not doing his work!” “She’s not listening to my ideas!” and ultimately, “Can’t I just work alone?”

The answer to that last question should usually be a resolute “no,” according to a forthcoming article that reveals the increasing importance of social skills in the contemporary labor market. Professions requiring high levels of social interaction — such as managers, teachers, nurses, therapists, consultants, and lawyers — have grown by nearly 12 percentage points as a share of all jobs in the United States economy in the last 30 years. Math-intensive but less social jobs shrunk by 3.3 percentage points over the same period. The pay for more social-intensive jobs is increasing at a faster rate as well. 

For educators, it’s a reminder that working through those tricky group dynamics may have significant value for today’s young people.
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Florida school shooting survivor to lawmakers: 'Shame on you'

Florida school shooting survivor to lawmakers: 'Shame on you' | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
In an emotional rally Saturday in Fort Lauderdale, politicians and Marjory Stoneman Douglas students called for a ban on weapons like the one used to kill 17 people at the Florida high school, and urged voters to kick out lawmakers who oppose the move or who take money from the National Rifle Association.

In a fiery speech, senior Emma Gonzalez demanded national lawmakers do something to prevent mass school shootings.
"We certainly do not understand why it should be harder to make plans with friends on weekends than to buy an automatic or semiautomatic weapon," Gonzalez, who huddled in an auditorium during Wednesday's shooting, said at the rally outside a federal courthouse.
Gonzalez, whose palpable anger burst out in her words, demanded that laws change because she said they have not, while guns have changed.
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The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Professional Development Workshop

The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Professional Development Workshop | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
I had the great privilege of facilitating a staff workshop on growth mindsets for the teachers and staff at Carlos Rosario International School and more recently at ISTE 2015. Participants were given access to the slide deck in order interact with the slides and resources during the workshop. What follows are the activities along with…
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Washington Post: Best books of 2017

Washington Post: Best books of 2017 | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

“Our annual survey of the best books includes 10 we think are exceptionally rewarding and 100 more notable titles you shouldn’t miss.”


“Vladi­mir Putin has inspired a number of books seeking to explain his remarkable rise — and his remarkable hold on power. Few accounts are as ambitious, insightful and unsparing as Gessen’s “The Future Is History.” This is a sweeping intellectual history of Russia over the past four decades, told through a Tolstoyan gallery of characters. It makes a convincing if depressing case that Homo Sovieticus, the unique species created a century ago with the Bolshevik Revolution, did not die out along with the Soviet Union. What makes the book so worthwhile are its keen observations about Russia from the point of view of those experiencing its heavy-handed state. Gessen’s provocative conclusion that Putin’s Russia is just as much a totalitarian society as Stalin’s Soviet Union or Hitler’s Germany may not convince all readers. But you don’t need to agree with this assessment to find her book a sad, compelling indictment of the country where she was born, a country so traumatized by its monstrous past that it seems intent on repeating it. “

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NPR's Book Concierge

NPR's Book Concierge | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

What would you like to read?

Use the filters below to explore more than 350 titles NPR staff and critics loved this year. (You can also combine filters!) Want even more recommendations? Check out our favorite books from 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008

Staff Picks
Biography & Memoir
Book Club Ideas
Comics & Graphic Novels
Cookbooks & Food
Eye-Opening Reads
Family Matters
For Art Lovers
For History Lovers
For Music Lovers
Funny Stuff
Historical Fiction
Identity & Culture
It’s All Geek To Me
Kids' Books
Ladies First
Let's Talk About Sex
Love Stories
Mysteries & Thrillers
Nonfiction
Essays/Poetry/Short Stories
Rather Long
Rather Short
Realistic Fiction
Science!
Science Fiction & Fantasy
Seriously Great Writing
Tales From Around The World
The Dark Side
Young Adult

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The Best Science Books Of 2017: Ten Awesome Science Books For Curious Kids

The Best Science Books Of 2017: Ten Awesome Science Books For Curious Kids | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
‘Tis the season to inspire the budding scientists in your life with science stories and inquiry adventures. Whether it’s learning the basics of rocket science (for babies), exploring the diversity of life on earth, or soaring into the solar system, these children’s books are a perfect launch pad for exploration. We’ve also brainstormed some activities to do at home or in the classroom with the curious kiddos in your life after you’ve finished reading (and Science Friday’s Team Educate has plenty of other resources for you, too).
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Pocket: Best of 2017

Explore the articles, videos, and publishers that captured the attention of the Pocket community this year.
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Voucher Schools Championed By Betsy DeVos Can Teach What They Want. Turns Out They Teach Lies.

Voucher Schools Championed By Betsy DeVos Can Teach What They Want. Turns Out They Teach Lies. | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
PORTLAND, Ore. ― It was late morning in an artsy cafe, the smell of coffee and baked goods sweetening the air, and Ashley Bishop sat at a table, recalling a time when she was taught that most of secular American society was worthy of contempt.

Growing up in private evangelical Christian schools, Bishop saw the world in extremes, good and evil, heaven and hell. She was taught that to dance was to sin, that gay people were child molesters and that mental illness was a function of satanic influence. Teachers at her schools talked about slavery as black immigration, and instructors called environmentalists “hippie witches.”

Bishop’s family moved around a lot when she was a child, but her family always enrolled her in evangelical schools.

So when Bishop left school in 2003 and entered the real world at 17, she felt like she was an alien landing on Planet Earth for the first time. Having been cut off from mainstream society, she felt unequipped to handle the job market and develop secular friendships. Lacking shared cultural and historical references, she spent most of her 20s holed up in her bedroom, suffering from crippling social anxiety.

Now, at 31, she has become everything that she was once taught to hate. She shares an apartment with her girlfriend of two years. She sees a therapist and takes medication for depression, a condition born, in part, of her stifling education.  

Years later, some of the schools Bishop attended are largely the same, but some have changed in a significant way: Unlike when Bishop was a student, parents are not the only ones paying tuition for these fundamentalist religious schools – so are taxpayers. 
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Opinion | College Advice I Wish I’d Taken

Opinion | College Advice I Wish I’d Taken | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
I taught my first class at Columbia University’s M.F.A. program this month, and even though I’ve been teaching college writing since 1993, I initially felt a little intimidated by the school’s regal campus. That, and regretful.

I enjoyed going to college at the University of Michigan, an hour from home, but my secret humiliation is: I was the type of mediocre student I now disdain. As a freshman, I cared about my friends, my boyfriend and my poetry. Or, I cared about what my boyfriend thought of my friends, what my friends thought of him, and what they thought of my poetry about him. Here’s what I wish I’d known and done differently:

A’S ARE COOL AND COME WITH PERKS As a student, I saw myself as anti-establishment, and I hated tests; I barely maintained a B average. I thought only nerds spent weekends in the library studying. Recently I learned that my niece Dara, a sophomore at New York University with a 3.7 G.P.A. (and a boyfriend), was offered a week of travel in Buenos Aires as part of her honors seminar. I was retroactively envious to learn that a 3.5 G.P.A. or higher at many schools qualifies you for free trips, scholarships, grants, awards, private parties and top internships. At 20, I was too busy freaking out when said boyfriend disappeared (after sleeping with one of said friends). Students certainly don’t need to strive obsessively for perfection, but I should have prioritized grades, not guys.

SHOW UP AND SPEAK UP If a class was boring or it snowed, I’d skip. My rationale was that nobody in the 300-person lecture hall would notice and I could get notes later. Attendance barely counted. When I went, I’d sit quietly in back. Yet as a teacher, I see that the students who come weekly, sit in front, and ask and answer questions get higher grades and frankly, preferential treatment. After 15 weeks, I barely know the absentees or anyone Snapchatting the term away on their iPhones. It’s not just that these students flush $300 down the toilet every time they miss my class; participating can actually lead to payoffs. I reward those who try harder with recommendations, references, professional contacts and encouragement.
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‘Read me!’: Students race to craft forceful college essays as deadlines near

‘Read me!’: Students race to craft forceful college essays as deadlines near | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Find a telling anecdote about your 17 years on this planet. Examine your values, goals, achievements and perhaps even failures to gain insight into the essential you. Then weave it together in a punchy essay of 650 or fewer words that showcases your authentic teenage voice — not your mother’s or father’s — and helps you stand out among hordes of applicants to selective colleges.

That's not necessarily all. Be prepared to produce even more zippy prose for supplemental essays about your intellectual pursuits, personality quirks or compelling interest in a particular college that would be, without doubt, a perfect academic match.

Many high school seniors find essay writing the most agonizing step on the road to college, more stressful even than SAT or ACT testing. Pressure to excel in the verbal endgame of the college application process has intensified in recent years as students perceive that it’s tougher than ever to get into prestigious schools. Some well-off families, hungry for any edge, are willing to pay as much as $16,000 for essay-writing guidance in what one consultant pitches as a four-day “application boot camp.”
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Our society is in real jeopardy

Our society is in real jeopardy | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it

This is not a drill: The threats to our most personal data, our businesses, our infrastructure, our democracy, are absolutely real.

Why the world should worry about North Korea's cyber weapons
So, what can we do about it?



There were two crucial takeaways from the episode with "The Interview" that need to be recognized.


First, sophisticated cyberattacks are a new, everyday reality. That attack wasn't the first, and it obviously hasn't been the last. This threat isn't going anywhere.


Second, from now on, high-quality cybersecurity must be a pillar of modern society. In 2014, it enabled millions of people to watch a movie on Christmas Eve. Now, it's an essential ingredient to protecting our economy, our democracy and our way of life. This may all feel a little abstract, so let me be very specific about steps we can take, right now, to strengthen online security for everyone.

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10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings

10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Because I believe that our becoming, like the synthesis of meaning itself, is an ongoing and dynamic process, I’ve been reluctant to stultify it and flatten its ongoing expansiveness in static opinions and fixed personal tenets of living. But I do find myself continually discovering, then returning to, certain core values. While they may be refined and enriched in the act of living, their elemental substance remains a center of gravity for what I experience as myself.

I first set down some of these core beliefs, written largely as notes to myself that may or may not be useful to others, when Brain Pickings turned seven (which kindred spirits later adapted into a beautiful poster inspired by the aesthetic of vintage children’s books and a cinematic short film). I expanded upon them to mark year nine. Today, as I round the first decade of Brain Pickings, I feel half-compelled, half-obliged to add a tenth learning, a sort of crowning credo drawn from a constellation of life-earned beliefs I distilled in a commencement address I delivered in the spring of 2016.

Here are all ten, in the order that they were written.
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The thoughts of Chairman Xi

The thoughts of Chairman Xi | Learning, Teaching & Leading Today | Scoop.it
Xi Jinping is tightening his grip on power. How did one man come to embody China's destiny?
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