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Stories and Learning
Learning through scenarios, narrative context, and storytelling
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Tips for Storytelling in Learning

Tips for Storytelling in Learning | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
These are my live blogged notes from the InSync Training Byte session "Once Upon a Time, Storytelling WAS Learning" by Tom Campbell and Karin Rex. My side comments and thoughts in italics. Any erro...
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Why Great Educators Need to be Great Storytellers

Why Great Educators Need to be Great Storytellers | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
What do great educators and Hollywood directors have in common? They're
great at telling stories. This is important in — but not limited to —
visual mediums like video. But, before we talk about video let's take a
quick look at why storytelling works so well in teaching.
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Creating interactivities in e-Learning: 10 ways to challenge and engage your Learner

Creating interactivities in e-Learning: 10 ways to challenge and engage your Learner | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Lets be honest – Learning is not always an activity we look forward to. Trainings can be monotonous, especially in the context of ‘pure’ technology-aided learning. You do not have an instructor
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eLearning Guild Research: Karl Kapp on Using Stories by Patti Shank : Learning Solutions Magazine

eLearning Guild Research: Karl Kapp on Using Stories by Patti  Shank : Learning Solutions Magazine | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
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How Stories Can Scaffold Creative Learning - Edudemic

How Stories Can Scaffold Creative Learning - Edudemic | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
How might stories emphasize scaffolding, the external supports that contribute to our learning and finding new paths?

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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5 Kinds of Stories to Tell During Onboarding

5 Kinds of Stories to Tell During Onboarding | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

You can be proud to work here.

That is one of THE most important messages your new employee orientation program should communicate.


Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 8, 2013 1:17 PM

The author David Lee does a great job here explaining not only why stories should be used during employee orientation trainings, but which stories will lead to participants having a successful experience.


And begin to build pride in the company they have just joined, and increase their personal integrity.


Orienting new employees to the company is one of the place where all great corporate storytelling begins -- yet is mostly underutilized or ignored.


So Lee gives us both a reminder to not forget this area for applying business storytelling, and tips for which stories to tell.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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5 Leadership Storytelling Tips to Inspire Your Team Forward

5 Leadership Storytelling Tips to Inspire Your Team Forward | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

Storytelling isn’t just a way to make messages more interesting – it’s how we understand.

 

Communication skills are a expected competency, yet research from Bersin & Associates shows that 67% of Senior Executives report that leaders and mangers on their teams lack adequate presentation skills and communication skills for todays marketplace and workforce.

 

Storytelling may be a subset of communication, be we want to suggest moving it to the forefront to empower vision, delegation, team-building, presentation and general communication. Story is an underutilized tool that’s already in your toolbox, and you can dust it off with five simple ideas.

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Entrepreneurs Who Master Storytelling Win More - Forbes

Entrepreneurs Who Master Storytelling Win More - Forbes | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Starbucks Chairman Howard Shultz talks to the media at the Vancouver Waterfront Station location, celebrating 20 years of Starbucks in British Columbia.
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Why You Need to Tell Stories

Why You Need to Tell Stories | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Using stories to describe your product helps employees, customers, and press understand how it works in the real world, not in a presentation deck.
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Data visualisation success hinges on solid storytelling skills

Data visualisation success hinges on solid storytelling skills | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Learn more about the value of data visualisation. Tableau's Jock Mackinlay explains why data is inert and worthless without the twin practices of visualisation and storytelling.

 

This is a quick piece that makes some valuable points. Frankly, I'm not a hard-core data head. Yet I love looking at spreadsheets, bar charts, line charts and other visual displays of data in order to make meaning of the material and spot trends. 

 

There is a whole science to displaying data in meaningful ways (see Edward Tufte's work) that we don't need to go into here. But what I like about this article is that it points to the fact that all the data in the world is meaningless until you can tell the story about what it is saying and what it means.


Storytelling and data go hand-in-hand.

 

Truly, those of us in the field of business storytelling need to build our data skills. And data-geeks need to develop their storytelling skills. Sounds like a match made in heaven!

 

Here's another aspect of storytelling that this article alludes to: yes, we all know it takes time to share a story and in this fast-paced world, it is not uncommon to hear "But who has the time?! Just give me the data to share. We've got to get moving!"  Ahhhhh -- huge mistake! Taking the time to share a story in the beginning makes projects go much more quickly. 

 

That sounds counter-intuitive, but I experience this phenomenon again and again.

 

Read the article for additional points on how the marriage of data and storytelling make for better decision making. They are worth remembering.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Bas Kooter, Dr. Karen Dietz
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Samreen Sharif's comment, September 7, 2012 8:48 PM
cool
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How to turn your power point sales presentations into a “Buying Simulator" -- via Stories

How to turn your power point sales presentations into a “Buying Simulator" -- via Stories | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story/it


Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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5 Ways Storytelling Can Boost Participation and Performance - Forbes

5 Ways Storytelling Can Boost Participation and Performance - Forbes | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Boost morale, performance and collaboration by telling the story in which others want to participate.
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Stories Versus Narratives

Stories Versus Narratives | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
At a time when we’ve all become obsessed with the power of story-telling, I’ve become increasingly focused on the missed opportunity to harness the much greater power of narratives, especially for institutions.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 9, 2013 2:09 PM

John Hagel is a highly influential business thought leader. Yet his latest blog post on where he distinguishes between stories and narratives is problematic I think. I just commented on his blog and here is my take on the article (exerpts are in quotes with my thoughts below):


 “To recap, here are the distinctions.  First, stories are self-contained – they have a beginning, a middle and an end. Narratives on the other hand are open-ended – the outcome is unresolved, yet to be determined.”

What you are describing is a culture or a thought system that is made up of a collection of stories, beliefs, attitudes, ways of doing, actions, symbols, language, etc. Reducing culture down to the term ‘narrative’ narrows our thinking about organizational life, community, and humanity in my opinion.

 

If we consider stories as only being about a beginning-middle-end structure, then they are self-contained. However, structure is only a small part of stories. In fact, stories are dynamic events, not discrete objects. Treating stories as objects leads to this kind of odd distinction being made between stories and narratives. In truth, the grand ‘narrative’ discussed here is made up of hundreds or thousands of stories that are always fluid and in motion. They work dynamically on people sometimes long after the telling. As performances, as events, story’s beginnings and ends are ephemeral as folklorists and anthropologists have recognized for decades.

 

“Second, stories are about me, the story-teller, or other people; they are not about you.  In contrast, the resolution of narratives depends on the choice you make and the actions you take – you will determine the outcome.”

Stories when told orally are co-created experiences and not passively consumed – and all great storytellers know that. They also know that stories are always about the other person, not themselves or other people – regardless if a personal story is being shared. That is the biggest lesson businesses need to learn. Stories hold different problem solving structures within them. Once hearing a story, the choices people make about actions to take are always up to them. This is the craft of storytelling versus messaging – another lesson businesses need to learn. Stories are guides – actions are up to the listener. So the distinction here between stories and narratives is again problematic. I would rather the discussion focus on getting businesses to understand the powerful dynamics of storytelling rather than on distinctions that may create more confusion.

 

“But to understand the much greater power of narrative, I point out that throughout history, millions of people have given their lives for narratives.  Every successful social movement in history has been driven at its core by a narrative that drove people to do amazing things, whether it’s the Christian narrative, the American narrative or the Marxist narrative. Narratives have an extraordinary power of pull.”

Narratives as movements are made up of a collection of stories, beliefs, and visions of the future that galvanize people. But folks do not relate to ‘narratives’ in this sense without having stories to connect to that are relevant to them personally. People will live and die for their stories. The aggregate of stories you are naming as a narrative are more aptly called ‘movements’ as  you wrote. This is because they move people to action based on what is being said that they can connect their own person stories to, and the vision that is present. Again, calling these movements ‘narratives’ is kind of limiting and I’m not sure really expands our understanding of the dynamics going on.

 

“While completely understandable and natural, these cognitive biases can lead to increasingly dysfunctional behavior.  I've written about this aspect of narratives in an earlier blog posting, but the cognitive biases that narratives can overcome are: risk aversion, shortening time horizons, zero-sum views of the world and erosion of trust.”

I don’t think that narratives overcome cognitive biases any better than stories do. In my decades of org story experience and all the research I’ve read, stories are the ultimate and best vehicle for overcoming cognitive biases. But again, this is all based on stories being understood as dynamic events and not as objects.

 

“If executives want to build institutions that can grow stronger in turbulent times, rather than weaker, they have to find ways to overcome these cognitive biases among their employees as well as among those they are trying to serve and collaborate with outside. Narratives can play an important role in accomplishing this.”

Authenticity, trust, engagement all happen through story sharing that over time eventually generates what is being called here a grand ‘narrative’. There is nothing inherently good in narratives just because one focuses on them. There are plenty of dysfunctional and debilitating ‘narratives’/cultures floating around out there. Grand narratives/cultures are not cooked up in some executive meeting – cultures emerge through time as people share stories, walk the talk, and live their beliefs. That culture – hopefully one that is positive and enlivens people -- is what companies can be known for. And that is the real work story professionals and businesses need to get done together.


What do you think? Any comments/reactions? Post here and on Hagel's blog!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Jim Signorelli,Story-Lab's comment, October 15, 2013 9:42 AM
Karen, I agree with you. Actually, I think Hagels whole narrative vs. story thing is just semantic doo-doo. All he had to say was that businesses need "living" stories that permeate all they do over time. Done.
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, October 15, 2013 12:11 PM
Well said Jim! Yes, the distinctions being made are bogus and only muddy the waters instead of providing clarity. As if our work isn't hard enough!
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Win Over Your e-Learners with Storytelling

Win Over Your e-Learners with Storytelling | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
Storytelling is a powerful technique. Stories are what keep us captivated at the movies, through all 12 books in a series - and they’re what keep you glued to the couch for every Tuesday night episode of your favorite drama. But did you know that stories have been grabbing your attention in places you may not even realize?
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How do stories work?

How do stories work? | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
I'm just back from a weekend in the Netherlands, which included a visit to Efterling, one of the world's oldest theme parks and home to the Enchanted Forest. As the name suggests, it's a woodland s...
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Boring to Brilliant: 5 Tips to Convert Your E-Learning to a Story-based Approach

Boring to Brilliant: 5 Tips to Convert Your E-Learning to a Story-based Approach | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
When consulting, I try to explain that simply exporting a PowerPoint presentation and calling it “e-learning” doesn't necessarily qualify it as e-learning. It’s not instructionally sound; it’s simply words, some large, some small, and often irrelevant photos or bad clip art, all minus the context. Without an instructor to flesh out the material or to add their own teachable stories to the content, learners may find nothing relevant, so they largely tune it out. Education presented in this manner produces little to no ROI.
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Tips for Using Stories in E-Learning

In keeping with the storytelling theme from previous blog post; using storytelling for learning, we discussed how stories can be used for learning and what makes a good story.


Via Mario Zidar
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The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains

The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
A good story can make or break a presentation, article, or conversation. But why is that? When Buffer co-founder Leo Widrich started to market his product through stories instead of benefits and bullet points, sign-ups went through the roof.
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What Great B2B Transmedia Storytelling Looks Like

What Great B2B Transmedia Storytelling Looks Like | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it
The phrase "transmedia storytelling" has been widely adopted in media/entertainment circles in the past few years.
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10 Apps & Sites for Digital Storytelling & more!

10 Apps & Sites for Digital Storytelling & more! | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

Via José Carlos
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Esther Coronel De Iberkleid's comment, December 28, 2012 4:35 PM
Great information!
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The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated

The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

"Stories are powerful because they transport us into other people’s worlds but, in doing that, they change the way our brains work and potentially change our brain chemistry — and that’s what it means to be a social creature."

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Video Game Writing and the Sense of Story [Writing]

Video Game Writing and the Sense of Story [Writing] | Stories and Learning | Scoop.it

Tadhg Kelly: "Game writing struggles with the contradictions of storytelling because the approach is wrong. The right approach is storysensing, not storytelling."


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