Learning Futures
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Learning Futures
The Learning Futures team focuses on strategic innovations that advance the mission of the university. The team helps shape the future of learning and teaching at the university through human and technological capacity building and promotes continuous improvement using learning analytics.
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Home - Education Futures

Home - Education Futures | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Education Futures is a globally-focused education research and development network with experience in collaborating with creatives, thought leaders, innovators, and learning organizations to create new opportunities for human potential development.
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Founded by Dr. John Moravec in 2009, Education Futures LLC is a globally-focused education research and development network with experience in collaborating with creatives, thought leaders, innovators, and learning organizations to create new opportunities for human potential development. We work with schools, universities, and nations to develop research, policies, and innovative solutions for problems that face education today – with an eye for the future. Our goal is to evolve our schools to create vibrant, visionary, hard-charging, front-running and value-creating impacts that everybody will be proud to variously support, work for, teach at, matriculate to, and collaborate with. This is something that must be build together with all stakeholders, and our work is centered on building a collective capacity to transform education. This is hard work, but we aim to have some fun as well. We are a network of subject matter experts, big dreamers, and change agents. We have a virtual presence, and a global footprint. We seek long-term value in the creation of meaningful education futures.
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This is Why Making Strong Learning Connections Matters in Teaching

It’s absolutely impossible for our students to learn without experiencing connections to the concepts we teach them. We can achieve this through providing both context and relevance. Without connection there is no interest, and interest always precedes meaningful and authentic learning. So it’s essential that we are making strong learning connections to help them develop the thinking habits they need to succeed.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
It’s absolutely impossible for our students to learn without experiencing connections to the concepts we teach them. We can achieve this through providing both context and relevance. Without connection there is no interest, and interest always precedes meaningful and authentic learning. So it’s essential that we are making strong learning connections to help them develop the thinking habits they need to succeed.
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What Giving Students Choice Looks Like in the Classroom | MindShift | KQED News

What Giving Students Choice Looks Like in the Classroom | MindShift | KQED News | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Excerpted from "Just Ask Us: Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement" by Heather Wolpert-Gawron.

Read the companion piece, "Why Choice Matters to Student Learning," for more about the research on student engagement and choice.

By Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Keeping in mind the prior research that proves there is such a thing as too much choice, it’s important to just look at all the possible options that teachers have who are looking to incorporate more choice in their classrooms.
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Keeping in mind the prior research that proves there is such a thing as too much choice, it’s important to just look at all the possible options that teachers have who are looking to incorporate more choice in their classrooms.
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Workers of tomorrow: the industries looking for new blood

Workers of tomorrow: the industries looking for new blood | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
What jobs will be on offer to students graduating high school this year?

That’s the question IBISWorld hoped to help answer through a new release on the industries set to add the most new jobs to the Australian economy.

The market research company looked at a combination of total employment number increases and annualised growth rates over the next five years.

So, under that metric, which areas will need plenty of new blood?
Kim Flintoff's insight:
What jobs will be on offer to students graduating high school this year? That’s the question IBISWorld hoped to help answer through a new release on the industries set to add the most new jobs to the Australian economy. The market research company looked at a combination of total employment number increases and annualised growth rates over the next five years. So, under that metric, which areas will need plenty of new blood?
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What does the future of teaching look like?

What does the future of teaching look like? | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Over the last few years, the Christensen Institute has written extensively on how innovation in K–12 education will impact teachers. We’ve tackled important questions such as “Will computers replace teachers?”, “How will technology change teaching?”, and “How do you develop teachers for next-gen classrooms?” Below are highlights of our key findings and insights.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Over the last few years, the Christensen Institute has written extensively on how innovation in K–12 education will impact teachers. We’ve tackled important questions such as “Will computers replace teachers?”, “How will technology change teaching?”, and “How do you develop teachers for next-gen classrooms?” Below are highlights of our key findings and insights.
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Lessons From A School Without Walls –

The school’s aim is to foster an environment in which student and teacher together are jointly responsible for learning. That heightened sense of ownership, which some research suggests could strengthen students’ desire to learn, is one of the many facets of an educational approach called “personalized learning.” Although definitions vary broadly, personalized learning endeavors to design educational experiences that suit an individual student’s abilities and interests. It’s an idea that’s gaining traction as technology offers new tools for both tracking student learning and customizing classwork based on past performance.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Our Future of Education is already happening in Denmark...

The school’s aim is to foster an environment in which student and teacher together are jointly responsible for learning. That heightened sense of ownership, which some research suggests could strengthen students’ desire to learn, is one of the many facets of an educational approach called “personalized learning.” Although definitions vary broadly, personalized learning endeavors to design educational experiences that suit an individual student’s abilities and interests. It’s an idea that’s gaining traction as technology offers new tools for both tracking student learning and customizing classwork based on past performance.
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Are we educating for life or school? –

Are we educating for life or school? – | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
“Knowing” doesn’t make you good at something on its own, which is why doing well in school doesn’t always translate to succeeding in life. In school, there are often clear rules and a narrow path that defines success. Life does not work this way. In fact, high achievers in school often struggle to make their own way in an uncertain world. Yet, as many of us expected to go to school, follow the rules, get a job out of school, that path is becoming more of a distant dream as kids today will have to create their jobs and a new path. When we become so focused on compliance, improving test scores, and covering it all, it can prevent us from the larger goals of developing learners to think, communicate, and generate novel ideas based on their passions and skills.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
“Knowing” doesn’t make you good at something on its own, which is why doing well in school doesn’t always translate to succeeding in life. In school, there are often clear rules and a narrow path that defines success. Life does not work this way. In fact, high achievers in school often struggle to make their own way in an uncertain world. Yet, as many of us expected to go to school, follow the rules, get a job out of school, that path is becoming more of a distant dream as kids today will have to create their jobs and a new path. When we become so focused on compliance, improving test scores, and covering it all, it can prevent us from the larger goals of developing learners to think, communicate, and generate novel ideas based on their passions and skills.
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The Future of Work When Machines Take It Over

In December 2017, a report from management consulting firm McKinsey & Company, "Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a Time of Automation," predicted that between "almost zero" and a third of work activities could be displaced by 2030, with wide variation among countries. (The more advanced the economy, the more likely the impact of automation.) While workforce transitions could hit between 75 million and 375 million people, overall, McKinsey found, more occupations will change than will be lost in a machine-driven world.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
In December 2017, a report from management consulting firm McKinsey & Company, "Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a Time of Automation," predicted that between "almost zero" and a third of work activities could be displaced by 2030, with wide variation among countries. (The more advanced the economy, the more likely the impact of automation.) While workforce transitions could hit between 75 million and 375 million people, overall, McKinsey found, more occupations will change than will be lost in a machine-driven world.
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Rising college costs are built in to the traditional business model—but they aren't inevitable

Rising college costs are built in to the traditional business model—but they aren't inevitable | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Disruptive models can make college radically affordable

Across industries, sustaining innovations help organizations stay competitive—until another type of innovation comes along. Disruptive Innovations are cheaper, simpler products and services that take root at the low-end of the market, often serving customers disregarded by more established industry competitors.

In higher education, business models are emerging that fit the disruption mold. One example is Western Governors University (WGU), which is growing at 20% annually, has raised tuition once in the past ten years (currently $6,500 per year), and as of this summer serves over 100,000 students. WGU primarily serves adult learners—not the prime market of 18- to 24-year-olds that more traditional colleges typically compete for—and provides those students with a radically different college experience.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
" Disruptive models can make college radically affordable Across industries, sustaining innovations help organizations stay competitive—until another type of innovation comes along. Disruptive Innovations are cheaper, simpler products and services that take root at the low-end of the market, often serving customers disregarded by more established industry competitors. In higher education, business models are emerging that fit the disruption mold. One example is Western Governors University (WGU), which is growing at 20% annually, has raised tuition once in the past ten years (currently $6,500 per year), and as of this summer serves over 100,000 students. WGU primarily serves adult learners—not the prime market of 18- to 24-year-olds that more traditional colleges typically compete for—and provides those students with a radically different college experience."
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Why teachers aren’t buying what education reformers are selling

Why teachers aren’t buying what education reformers are selling | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
So-called education reformers—myself included—constantly propose new plans, programs, and policies to fix whatever supposedly ails public education.

These ideas often fall flat because teachers aren’t buying what the reformers are selling.

For any change in a school to be successful, the teachers in that school have to buy-in and execute it well.

Too often reformers forget to understand the progress that teachers are trying to make. They ignore what would motivate teachers to make changes in their classrooms and schools.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
So-called education reformers—myself included—constantly propose new plans, programs, and policies to fix whatever supposedly ails public education. These ideas often fall flat because teachers aren’t buying what the reformers are selling. For any change in a school to be successful, the teachers in that school have to buy-in and execute it well. Too often reformers forget to understand the progress that teachers are trying to make. They ignore what would motivate teachers to make changes in their classrooms and schools.
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Learning in Three Dimensions: Report on the EDUCAUSE/HP Campus of the Future Project | EDUCAUSE

Learning in Three Dimensions: Report on the EDUCAUSE/HP Campus of the Future Project | EDUCAUSE | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Overview


The HP/EDUCAUSE Campus of the Future project explored the efforts of eleven colleges and universities to investigate the ways that augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and 3D scanning and printing technologies can benefit teaching, learning, and research.

This is the one of the broadest, most diverse studies to date of the integration of 3D technologies into higher education, in terms of sample size, learning environments, academic disciplines, and number of users. In this study, researchers explored the ability of extended reality technologies to enhance the educational experience, including participation in collaborative simulations of real world challenges; exploration of historical sites; audio simulations to improve the ease of hearing aid adjustments; and using AR overlays to increase understanding and capacity in participatory activities.

In collaboration with HP, select institutions were given AR, VR, and 3D printing and scanning technologies, which were utilized in myriad ways to create immersive and innovative learning experiences for students during the 2017-18 academic year. Through this research, EDUCAUSE researchers determined that 3D technologies are best used for experiential learning approaches that augment real-world examples, increasing access to subject matter, concepts, or locations that would otherwise be cost or logistically-prohibitive.   

Kim Flintoff's insight:
In collaboration with HP, select institutions were given AR, VR, and 3D printing and scanning technologies, which were utilized in myriad ways to create immersive and innovative learning experiences for students during the 2017-18 academic year. Through this research, EDUCAUSE researchers determined that 3D technologies are best used for experiential learning approaches that augment real-world examples, increasing access to subject matter, concepts, or locations that would otherwise be cost or logistically-prohibitive.
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Autonomy in the classroom: an international perspective

Autonomy in the classroom: an international perspective | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
We saw that even within the first five weeks of the school year, if you were in a classroom of a teacher who was a more controlling in his or her strategies for motivating, that not only did children feel less able to do schoolwork and less interested in doing their schoolwork, they wanted lower levels of challenge, they wanted things to be easier in the classroom because they didn’t want to make mistakes… If you had a teacher, on the other hand, who was autonomy supportive, children increased in their engagement in classroom and their interest and their desire for challenge and they felt better about themselves… And those results were pretty dramatic. It showed us just how powerful a classroom environment can be on a child’s motivation and wellness.”
Kim Flintoff's insight:
"We saw that even within the first five weeks of the school year, if you were in a classroom of a teacher who was a more controlling in his or her strategies for motivating, that not only did children feel less able to do schoolwork and less interested in doing their schoolwork, they wanted lower levels of challenge, they wanted things to be easier in the classroom because they didn’t want to make mistakes… If you had a teacher, on the other hand, who was autonomy supportive, children increased in their engagement in classroom and their interest and their desire for challenge and they felt better about themselves… And those results were pretty dramatic. It showed us just how powerful a classroom environment can be on a child’s motivation and wellness.”"
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Rebuilding education for the class of 2030 | IT-Online

Rebuilding education for the class of 2030 | IT-Online | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
Most of these learners, 33 %, were in the Foundation Phase, meaning they are between ages of six and nine. These young people will make up the workforce of the future and with the rapid advance of new technologies, they are likely to face a complicated global market.

Recent research estimates that by 2030 half of the work being done by people around the world today will be automated by existing technology, and up to 375-million people may need to switch occupational categories between now and then.

Policy makers will need to take this into account and embrace advances like artificial intelligence, cloud computing and the intelligent edge to empower young learners and equip teachers with the tools, knowledge and skills to effectively shape their students’ young minds.

The future of education
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Most of these learners, 33 %, were in the Foundation Phase, meaning they are between ages of six and nine. These young people will make up the workforce of the future and with the rapid advance of new technologies, they are likely to face a complicated global market. Recent research estimates that by 2030 half of the work being done by people around the world today will be automated by existing technology, and up to 375-million people may need to switch occupational categories between now and then. Policy makers will need to take this into account and embrace advances like artificial intelligence, cloud computing and the intelligent edge to empower young learners and equip teachers with the tools, knowledge and skills to effectively shape their students’ young minds. The future of education
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New collaboration offers regional students more study opportunities - News and Events | Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

New collaboration offers regional students more study opportunities - News and Events | Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Professor Mark Buntine, the Head of the School of Molecular and Life Sciences at Curtin University, and Geraldton Universities Centre Chair Steve Douglas.


Students living in the Mid-West region will be able to access Curtin University courses from next year as the result of a new collaboration with the Geraldton Universities Centre (GUC).

The arrangements, set out in a Service Level Agreement signed yesterday, will start with Curtin’s new Associate Degree in Agribusiness being offered in Geraldton, from 2019.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
Students living in the Mid-West region will be able to access Curtin University courses from next year as the result of a new collaboration with the Geraldton Universities Centre (GUC). The arrangements, set out in a Service Level Agreement signed yesterday, will start with Curtin’s new Associate Degree in Agribusiness being offered in Geraldton, from 2019.
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5 Scenarios for Education in 2030

5 Scenarios for Education in 2030 | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

Hello from sunny Sydney, where we just completed industry and investor roundtables with now nearly 200 executives, entrepreneurs and investors across Asia Pac after Melbourne and Beijing too. Next week San Francisco and New York, then Paris and London just in time for the holidays. Our Global Education Roundtables are invitation-only, but if you'd like to learn more please do so here. 

One of the themes we have been deep diving at the roundtables is our five scenarios for Education in 2030. Over 5,000 folks around the world have shared their personal estimates for how likely each scenario is to develop and which they prefer if they were forced to pick just one. If you are already familiar with the scenarios or once you have had the chance to read through them, please join our global cohort of experts crowdsourcing a vision for the future of learning and talent.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
If that's not enough, Education in 2030 also comes in a free 60-page report that deep dives through the four drivers of the global expansion in education with over 100 charts, tables with sources and references for further research.
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Idaho becomes second state in the country to adopt all 9 CS polices

Idaho just became the second state in the country to adopt a robust policy plan to expand computer science in schools across the state. This is an impressive milestone and shows what can be achieved when teachers, students, legislators and community members work collaboratively toward the expansion of computer science education!
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Idaho just became the second state in the country to adopt a robust policy plan to expand computer science in schools across the state. This is an impressive milestone and shows what can be achieved when teachers, students, legislators and community members work collaboratively toward the expansion of computer science education!
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Want Kids to Use Tech Productively? That's 'Asking the Impossible' - Teaching Ahead: A Roundtable - Education Week Teacher

In the decade since the release of smartphones, I've never caught a student on his or her device talking with experts in Botswana about water conservation, or anything like it. Students play games, take selfies, and message their parents and friends. When I shared this video with my students, they erupted into laughter. One student volunteered, "If you see me on my phone, there's a 0 percent chance I'm doing something productive. If you see me on my laptop, there's a 50 percent chance." Most students disagreed. They thought 50 percent was too high.

....

When teachers put devices in the hands of kids and expect them to be productive, they're expecting too much. Teaching kids with technology is analogous to having an AA meeting in a bar.

Kim Flintoff's insight:


You might as well say kids are trained to read books for pleasure not for learning - as they are in the early years - and yet teachers take that basic skill and work to transfer the skill to a new context and new purpose.

I dare say that the same basic instructional design exists in bringing a new mindset to technology use.

Create engaging learning experiences and reason to use tech appropriately and surprise, kids do.
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Modelling Thinking & Learning

Modelling Thinking & Learning | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
According to Ron Ritchhart, seeing ourselves through our students' eyes is the key to being a great model for thinking. He describes two types of modelling in
Kim Flintoff's insight:
He describes two types of modelling in the classroom. The first is explicit modelling. This is when you are demonstrating and showing a process or procedure that you want the student to adopt. The second is modelling who we are as thinkers and learners, known as implicit modelling. In a classroom there will be a continuum of this modelling from implicit to explicit. This is a ‘hidden’ dimension of teaching. Understanding the power, nuance and complexity of this can help change a common misconception that teaching simply consists of just being the delivery of information.
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BBC - Future - How the internet is becoming a part of us

BBC - Future - How the internet is becoming a part of us | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

“I think it is likely in the next 200 years or so Homo sapiens will upgrade themselves into some idea of a divine being, either through biological manipulation or genetic engineering of by the creation of cyborgs, part organic part non-organic. It will be the greatest evolution in biology since the appearance of life. Nothing really has changed in four billion years biologically speaking. But we will be as different from today’s humans as chimps are now from us.”

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“I think it is likely in the next 200 years or so Homo sapiens will upgrade themselves into some idea of a divine being, either through biological manipulation or genetic engineering of by the creation of cyborgs, part organic part non-organic. It will be the greatest evolution in biology since the appearance of life. Nothing really has changed in four billion years biologically speaking. But we will be as different from today’s humans as chimps are now from us.”
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The Virtual Work Skills You Need — Even If You Never Work Remotely

The Virtual Work Skills You Need — Even If You Never Work Remotely | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
We often think of “virtual work” as working with someone located outside an office, or in another city or country. This type of work is on the rise: a 2017 Gallup report found 43% of American employees work remotely; in another survey, 48% of respondents reported that a majority of their virtual teamwork involved members from other cultures.

However, virtual work also encompasses how we are turning to technology to conduct business with nearby colleagues, sometimes within the same building or campus. At a large consumer-products firm where we’ve been conducting research, an HR director recounted the changes she witnessed in employees located in two buildings a few miles apart. “Ten years ago, we would regularly drive between buildings to meet each other, but today, we almost never do; meetings are conducted by videoconference and everything else is handled on e-mail and IM.”
Kim Flintoff's insight:
We often think of “virtual work” as working with someone located outside an office, or in another city or country. This type of work is on the rise: a 2017 Gallup report found 43% of American employees work remotely; in another survey, 48% of respondents reported that a majority of their virtual teamwork involved members from other cultures. However, virtual work also encompasses how we are turning to technology to conduct business with nearby colleagues, sometimes within the same building or campus. At a large consumer-products firm where we’ve been conducting research, an HR director recounted the changes she witnessed in employees located in two buildings a few miles apart. “Ten years ago, we would regularly drive between buildings to meet each other, but today, we almost never do; meetings are conducted by videoconference and everything else is handled on e-mail and IM.”
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Unis could ‘become irrelevant’: lessons for Australia from a UK VC

Unis could ‘become irrelevant’: lessons for Australia from a UK VC | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
In Perth to deliver the 2018 Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Oration at Edith Cowan University on Friday, like the UK PM, the Vice-Chancellor of Portsmouth University initially uttered the much-maligned ‘B’ word.

“You will be delighted that I don’t intend to focus on Brexit itself,” he assured the audience. Instead, he explored its causes, in the context of his lengthy speech, ‘Universities are central to societies’ future success – but only if we learn some lessons’.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
In Perth to deliver the 2018 Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Oration at Edith Cowan University on Friday, like the UK PM, the Vice-Chancellor of Portsmouth University initially uttered the much-maligned ‘B’ word. “You will be delighted that I don’t intend to focus on Brexit itself,” he assured the audience. Instead, he explored its causes, in the context of his lengthy speech, ‘Universities are central to societies’ future success – but only if we learn some lessons’.
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[PDF] It's learning: Just not as we know it

[PDF] It's learning: Just not as we know it | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
The future of Work is a race between education and technologies. Blockchain, AI and advanced biosciences promise new efficiencies and growth opportunities at a time when leading economies are struggling with weak productivity gains and, in some cases, slow GDP growth. But it’s easier said than done.
 
Industrial age education and training systems put these economic opportunities at risk. If skill-building doesn’t catch up with the rate of technological progress, the G20 economies could lose up to US$11.5 trillion in cumulative GDP growth in the next ten years. That’s equivalent to losing more than an entire percentage point from the average annual growth rate every year over that period.
 
For this report, we look through the lens of the future worker – from the shop floor to the boardroom, from the shop front to the back office – and we identify their evolving skills demand. We analyze the changing importance of skills to different roles and the impact of intelligent technologies.
 
Contrary to conventional wisdom, this is not about technological skills. It is about cultivating the full range of skills, from the creative to the complex cognitive capabilities that the future workforce will need. Our diagnosis: Current education and corporate learning systems are not equipped to address the coming revolution in skills demand. The challenge is especially urgent for roles that are more vulnerable to dislocation through intelligent automation. The impact is uneven across economies and industries, demanding targeted interventions.
 
Our proposed solutions: Learning with experiential techniques, shifting the focus from institutions to individuals and empowering the most vulnerable people to learn. Advances in the science of learning, paired with new technologies, allow pioneering businesses to offer new approaches to learning. The challenge? Accelerating their adoption across all organizations, large and small, and throughout education systems in the G20 economies.

Via Edumorfosis
Kim Flintoff's insight:
The future of Work is a race between education and technologies. Blockchain, AI and advanced biosciences promise new efficiencies and growth opportunities at a time when leading economies are struggling with weak productivity gains and, in some cases, slow GDP growth. But it’s easier said than done.
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High Schools That Work

High Schools That Work | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
High Schools That Work is the nation’s largest school improvement initiative for high school leaders and teachers.

More than 1,200 HSTW sites in 30 states and the District of Columbia currently use the HSTW Goals and Key Practices to raise student achievement and graduation rates.

HSTW’s annual Staff Development Conference attracts thousands of educators each year for professional development. HSTW publications, case studies, site development guides and other materials help improve high school curriculum and instruction across the nation.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Systemic change that seems headed int he right direction to be more future relevant:

"High Schools That Work is the nation’s largest school improvement initiative for high school leaders and teachers. More than 1,200 HSTW sites in 30 states and the District of Columbia currently use the HSTW Goals and Key Practices to raise student achievement and graduation rates. HSTW’s annual Staff Development Conference attracts thousands of educators each year for professional development. HSTW publications, case studies, site development guides and other materials help improve high school curriculum and instruction across the nation."
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Why competency, not grades, is the assessment style of the future

Why competency, not grades, is the assessment style of the future | Learning Futures | Scoop.it
When principal of Templestowe College, Peter Hutton, was at school, like many of us, he was told that one day the esoteric-seeming knowledge he gained would be useful.

“That hasn’t happened yet,” Hutton quipped at a recent event.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
When principal of Templestowe College, Peter Hutton, was at school, like many of us, he was told that one day the esoteric-seeming knowledge he gained would be useful. “That hasn’t happened yet,” Hutton quipped at a recent event.
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Australia's Science Channel | Girls and boys perform the same in STEM subjects

Australia's Science Channel | Girls and boys perform the same in STEM subjects | Learning Futures | Scoop.it

For years the male dominance of STEM-related careers has been explained away as women having less aptitude for the relevant subjects. But a new study challenges this view, finding a high similarity between male and female performance in science, technology, engineering and mathematics). It even goes so far as to suggest that the top 10% of a class was, on average, equal parts male and female. The study, conducted by Rose O’Dea and published today in the journal Nature Communications, a PhD student at Australia’s University of News South Wales, collected data from more than 1.6 million students, from age six to university across 268 different schools. , It focused on the gender differences in variability regarding academic grades.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
For years the male dominance of STEM-related careers has been explained away as women having less aptitude for the relevant subjects. But a new study challenges this view, finding a high similarity between male and female performance in science, technology, engineering and mathematics). It even goes so far as to suggest that the top 10% of a class was, on average, equal parts male and female. The study, conducted by Rose O’Dea and published today in the journal Nature Communications, a PhD student at Australia’s University of News South Wales, collected data from more than 1.6 million students, from age six to university across 268 different schools. , It focused on the gender differences in variability regarding academic grades.
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