Learning At Work
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Learning At Work
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Curated by Roger Francis
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The three mental biases that are sabotaging your decision-making  

The three mental biases that are sabotaging your decision-making   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

If anxiety is keeping you awake at night, welcome to the club. The Clinical Sleep Research Unit at Loughborough University says that almost a third of us suffer from it. Worrying about the outcome of events is something that comes to all leaders, and it’s quite normal. In fact, part of the problem is that people think it’s not normal.

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The Virtual Work Skills You Need — Even If You Never Work Remotely

The Virtual Work Skills You Need — Even If You Never Work Remotely | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Maintaining strong, productive relationships with clients and co-workers can be challenging when you never see the person you’re working with. Yet, it is common to have ongoing work relationships – sometimes lasting years — with people you’ve never met in person.

We often think of “virtual work” as working with someone located outside an office, or in another city or country. This type of work is on the rise: a 2017 Gallup report found 43% of American employees work remotely; in another survey, 48% of respondents reported that a majority of their virtual teamwork involved members from other cultures.

However, virtual work also encompasses how we are turning to technology to conduct business with nearby colleagues, sometimes within the same building or campus. At a large consumer-products firm where we’ve been conducting research, an HR director recounted the changes she witnessed in employees located in two buildings a few miles apart. “Ten years ago, we would regularly drive between buildings to meet each other, but today, we almost never do; meetings are conducted by videoconference and everything else is handled on e-mail and IM.”

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Managers need coaching skills - People Development Magazine

Managers need coaching skills - People Development Magazine | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Coaching staff, not managing them works. Many businesses are hiring experts to help improve management. And for those businesses getting management right, it’s paying dividends. All managers need coaching skills. It’s simple. Get the best out of your people and your business has more chance of success.

Let’s take a look at the old-school style of management, what makes a good manager and why managers need coaching skills to succeed.

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Yanglish's curator insight, September 19, 1:40 AM
The key themes associated with good management are:

 • An environment of collaboration and coaching 
• Positioning of employee goals to meet business objectives 
• Recruiting and retaining the best staff and importantly not being afraid to hire people better then themselves
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Starting a New Job? Take Control of Your Onboarding

Starting a New Job? Take Control of Your Onboarding | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

It can set you up to succeed later on.

Roger Francis's insight:
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Time management: why being ‘busy’ isn’t always a good thing

Time management: why being ‘busy’ isn’t always a good thing | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Advances in digital technology mean that we’re now expected to be ‘always on’, but how useful is this in a leadership context? Thinking time is an underrated commodity today – but it’s one that leaders should fight for.

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Mostafa Daise's curator insight, July 23, 1:00 AM
I couldn't really follow this article; However, I did enjoy the reading. What if free time really is the answer
 
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8 Tips for Making Better Decisions via Achieve 

8 Tips for Making Better Decisions via Achieve  | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
We’ve all made our share of bad decisions. Decisions where the result surprised us, and not for the good.We thought it would work out differently but then we end up looking at a mess, or at an unintended conclusion. In classical mythology an oracle was a person who provided wise counsel. There is a story of King Croesus, who consults ... Read More

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient

6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Change frightens us because it is a voyage into the unknown. Ironically, since the unknown forces us to adapt to new circumstances, it is also the place where we can develop new talents and strengths. If we are resilient, we can embark on a journey that moves us beyond self-limiting beliefs, boredom, and lack of confidence.

Change is the great dream of every heart because it moves us closer to our full potential. To refuse the challenge that comes with change can be a great act of self-neglect.

If you have mental toughness, you will do anything to break the cycle of behavior that disempowers you. To push beyond your limits takes a resilient mind. It requires you to move into your discomfort zone and cross a threshold that awakens a variety of emotions such as confusion, fear, excitement, sadness—and yes, dreams.

There should always be a healthy tension between the life we have settled for and the potential that still calls us.

Here are 6 easy steps to make you more resilient:

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 26, 6:28 AM

FBI veteran LaRae Quy on how to develop the resilience we all need.

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How the Word 'Should' Divides and Disappoints

How the Word 'Should' Divides and Disappoints | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

“Dave should have picked me to be on that special project team. He’s my boss. He should have known I wanted to participate.”

Should. Such a limiting word. It gifts us with frustration and anger.

“I should have been asked to lead the discussion group. They should have known that I’m good at that kind of work.”

Should. It leads us down paths of disappointment and resentment.

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5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations

5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
According to the 2015 Employee Trends Report by Quantum Workplace, one of the biggest areas of concern for team members is that there is often not open and honest communication with managers.  So why is this? Why does miscommunication pervade at least 50% of business conversations? Is technology to blame or are there some other dynamics at work.

In my experience, yes technology does have a part to play. Emails and text can be taken out of context and without any supporting body language to back up the conversation they can fuel anxiety and in some cases, escalate beyond repair, this is why face to face conversations are so much more effective.

And yet face to face conversations too can lead to miscommunication especially when the manager fails to lead the conversation or is fearful about discussing the subject. Take for example if a manager needs to have a difficult conversation with team members, say about their performance. If the manager is not feeling confident in having the conversation they might not articulate clearly the problem and so the team member leaves confused about what they have done wrong. This then causes the situation to escalate and before long both parties become frustrated. I call these conversations Courageous Conversations as they require the manager to be ruthlessly honest and transparent, often saying things that no-one has said in the past.

Having a clear framework for navigating these Courageous Conversations is essential to help managers approach the situation with confidence and certainty. This is why I developed the 6 C’s to Successful Courageous Conversations Framework.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 13, 5:51 AM

Useful framework for putting the fish on the table! if you don't, you may soon notice a funny smell getting in the way of productivity...

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5 Common Complaints About Meetings and What to Do About Them

5 Common Complaints About Meetings and What to Do About Them | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

We all complain about meetings. We have too many. They’re a waste of time. Nothing gets done. These complaints often have merit, but they are so broad that they’re difficult to argue with and harder to address.

There are specific complaints that can be tackled, however. When I ask people in the workshops I lead what they most want help with, five issues consistently come up:

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Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?

Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving? | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

It’s possible to fake emotional intelligence. Similar to knockoffs of luxury watches or handbags, there are emotions and actions that look like the real thing but really aren’t. With the best of intentions, I’ve seen smart leaders charge into sensitive interactions armed with what they believed was a combination of deep empathy, attuned listening, and self-awareness but was, in fact, a way to serve their own emotional needs. It’s important to learn to spot these forgeries, especially if you’re the forger.

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Delegate with Clarity, Commitment, and Accountability

Delegate with Clarity, Commitment, and Accountability | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

 
When business leaders learn how to delegate, the results can be amazing. Yet most leaders struggle with delegation. Reasons? Although it’s a huge time and energy saver in the long run, effective delegation requires an investment of time and energy in the short run. It also takes a dose of humility. Occupying the corner office doesn’t mean your ideas, talents, energy, and so on are superior to everyone else’s.

Effective delegators take pride and satisfaction in their ability to delegate. As former president Ronald Reagan said, “Surround yourself with the best people you can find, delegate authority, and don’t interfere as long as the policy you’ve decided upon is being carried out.”

To delegate effectively, you must do so with clarity, commitment, and accountability. Vagueness about the work being delegated gets you nowhere. Commitment comes from conveying to the “delegatee” a sense of ownership and purpose. And accountability runs in both directions: Are we keeping our respective commitments and are we measuring results?

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How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You

How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

We’ve all been there: those times you need to argue your point of view to someone who you know disagrees with you. You immediately go to your keyboard and start to type out that 280-character tweet, the Facebook reply, or a paragraphs-long email. Surely the reason, logic, and sheer power of your written words will convince whoever it is who disagrees with you to see your point of view? But new research suggests these written arguments may not be the best approach.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 1:43 AM

Research suggests oral, not written, communication works best.

Yanglish's curator insight, May 14, 10:27 AM
...written arguments may not be the best approach.
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Modern Professional Learning: A new mindset, toolset and skillset – A Guide to Modern Professional Learning

Modern Professional Learning: A new mindset, toolset and skillset – A Guide to Modern Professional Learning | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

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5 Steps to Personal Productivity

Follow these five steps to make a weekly productivity plan and get the job done.

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Daniel Watson's curator insight, October 7, 9:52 PM

 

The main reason, why a lot of business owners are not as productive as they should be, is that they don't plan to be productive. A daily plan that keeps you on task, is a sure fire way. to increase your personal productivity. This article, outlines five steps to follow, to create your own weekly productivity plan.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, October 8, 1:44 AM

A to-do list is simply that – a list. It’s an unorganized ledger of tasks that need to be completed at some point, by someone. While they codify objectives to execute, they do little else. In contrast, a plan is a strategy for execution. It comprises all the resources – including your own efforts and tasks – to tactically achieve an objective.

Marie Torossian, CPA, CGMA's curator insight, October 8, 6:06 AM
When you're the owner of a small business you are managing every thing! To keep you on track here are 5 steps to personal productivity and effectiveness to keep you and your business on track! 
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What to Do When You Have a Bad Boss

What to Do When You Have a Bad Boss | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Despite the $15 billion companies spend annually on managerial and leadership development, bad bosses are common in the American workforce.  A study by Life Meets Work found that 56% of American workers claim their boss is mildly or highly toxic. A study by the American Psychological Association found that 75% of Americans say their “boss is the most stressful part of their workday.”

And a recent study by Gallup found that one in two employees have left a job “to get away from their manager at some point in their career.”

Surprisingly, though, another study found that employees end up working longer (two years, on average) for toxic bosses than nontoxic bosses. Why?

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Neuroscience at work: how to have more productive conversations

Neuroscience at work: how to have more productive conversations | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Communication in a business environment can often go wrong, even when it’s carefully planned. To understand how to better express ourselves with colleagues, we must first appreciate the neuroscientific aspects at work – i.e. how our brains interpret information – before we can modify our approach.

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The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine

The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know | Greater Good Magazine | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
On the face of it, maybe not. University professors, some of the most learned individuals in the world, are not generally known for their intellectual humility. And plenty of successful scientists, CEOs, doctors, artists, and political leaders master their trades without appearing to develop much intellectual humility.

Then again, as Nobel Prize–winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar noted, believing that you “must be right”—in other words, lacking intellectual humility—can actually stymie discovery, learning, and progress.

Given this puzzle, my colleagues and I set out to test whether intellectual humility was empirically associated with learning outcomes.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 19, 5:40 AM

The empirical benefits of intellectual humility!

Tom Wojick's curator insight, July 31, 12:57 PM

One thing that is consistent in resilient people and organizations is the ability to know when you don't know and having the courage to admit to it. Curiosity didn't kill the cat; it gave it nine lives. 

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4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity

4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Ambiguity makes people feel uncomfortable—it’s a fear amplifier. The pace of change is fast, disruption is coming from many directions, and what worked in the past just doesn’t work anymore. New technologies, global competition, radical changes in long-standing business models, and policy shifts are rampant. Meanwhile, the challenges we face in every direction—healthcare, education, financial and beyond—are more complicated than ever before. And yet, you can’t plan your way forward the way you could in the past.

When navigating ambiguity, instead of a finite plan, you’re choreographing moments where people come together to make progress. It’s about guiding people through the process even though you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s about having the right people together at the right time, not necessarily the “right” answer.5 And crafting the space for your team to explore and build (rather than plan) the path ahead. You need to create the contexts and conditions for your team to evolve as the world changes. Innovation is the unexpected and the breakthrough. How do you sight it on the horizon? 

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 28, 5:08 AM

IDEO on sailing the waters of ambiguity - a necessary if not always  sufficient condition for success today.

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5 people skills you need in a connected world

5 people skills you need in a connected world | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The many different challenges associated with digital transformation affect not only companies but also their employees. What people skills do they need to develop to keep pace with the demands of an increasingly digitalized and connected world? We posed this question to experts who work on issues related to digital transformation on an everyday basis.


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How to be a good listener  

How to be a good listener   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Being a bad listener costs the world £5.2 trillion pounds. Here’s how to improve your listening skills

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Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process

Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Take the fear out of feedback with Feedforward


Feed forward. It’s an alternative approach to traditional feedback designed to deliver constructive feedback focusing on a person’s development in the future. Feedback, by its very name, examines the past, which cannot be altered. Feedforward, by contrast, looks ahead at a future potential that is conceivably within our control. Feedback carries judgment and opinion; Feedforward is about people and their development. It’s a positive, future-focused, personal development process that, if used with conventional feedback, can minimize apprehensions or reactions to the latter’s delivery, such as hurt feelings, dissent, friction, and so on.


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David Hain's curator insight, June 7, 6:27 AM

Feedforward - worth considering as a development technique. Exercise example here.

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Delegation Is an Art (and Here Are 9 Simple Ways to Do It Better)

Delegation Is an Art (and Here Are 9 Simple Ways to Do It Better) | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

When you lead others, it is important to know that there is an art to delegating. While some leaders think it takes too much of their time and attention to delegate work to their people, there's a big upside to this process. If done correctly, you will find that your staff are more productive and happier as a result. When your people know you trust them enough to delegate an important task, it boosts their motivation to get the job done. 

 

It is a sign of greatness when a leader has the ability to enable their employees to get things done. One research study showed that 53 percent of business owners believe that they can grow their business by more than 20 percent if they only delegate 10 percent of their workload to someone else. That's huge.


Via The Learning Factor
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5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance

5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
I’m a hard-nosed realist who used to look at things like visualization as "woo woo" New Age. Little did I know at the time that I could use visualization to achieve top performance and point to solid science to explain why it worked. Achieving my goal was about more than work and discipline; it was also about physiology.


Whenever we use visualization to achieve top performance, our brain releases a neurotransmitter called dopamine. That is the chemical that becomes active when we encounter situations that are linked to rewards from the past. Dopamine enables us to not only see rewards but also to move toward them. So every time we visualize our achievement, our brain stores that information as a success.


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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 6:05 AM

We all have stuff we are scared of. I learned the power of visualisation when I was coached before a walk on hot coals. This brief piece from @LaRaeQuy puts the science and process very well.

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Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It.

Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It. | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
A growing body of research is making it clear that learners are made, not born. Through the deliberate use of practice and dedicated strategies to improve our ability to learn, we can all develop expertise faster and more effectively. In short, we can all get better at getting better.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, May 11, 3:06 AM

People/teams/organisations who learn better and faster typically outdo those who don't focus on learning. And learning well can be learned...