Learning At Work
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Learning At Work
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4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity

4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Ambiguity makes people feel uncomfortable—it’s a fear amplifier. The pace of change is fast, disruption is coming from many directions, and what worked in the past just doesn’t work anymore. New technologies, global competition, radical changes in long-standing business models, and policy shifts are rampant. Meanwhile, the challenges we face in every direction—healthcare, education, financial and beyond—are more complicated than ever before. And yet, you can’t plan your way forward the way you could in the past.

When navigating ambiguity, instead of a finite plan, you’re choreographing moments where people come together to make progress. It’s about guiding people through the process even though you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s about having the right people together at the right time, not necessarily the “right” answer.5 And crafting the space for your team to explore and build (rather than plan) the path ahead. You need to create the contexts and conditions for your team to evolve as the world changes. Innovation is the unexpected and the breakthrough. How do you sight it on the horizon? 

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 28, 5:08 AM

IDEO on sailing the waters of ambiguity - a necessary if not always  sufficient condition for success today.

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5 people skills you need in a connected world

5 people skills you need in a connected world | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The many different challenges associated with digital transformation affect not only companies but also their employees. What people skills do they need to develop to keep pace with the demands of an increasingly digitalized and connected world? We posed this question to experts who work on issues related to digital transformation on an everyday basis.


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How to be a good listener  

How to be a good listener   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Being a bad listener costs the world £5.2 trillion pounds. Here’s how to improve your listening skills

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Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process

Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Take the fear out of feedback with Feedforward


Feed forward. It’s an alternative approach to traditional feedback designed to deliver constructive feedback focusing on a person’s development in the future. Feedback, by its very name, examines the past, which cannot be altered. Feedforward, by contrast, looks ahead at a future potential that is conceivably within our control. Feedback carries judgment and opinion; Feedforward is about people and their development. It’s a positive, future-focused, personal development process that, if used with conventional feedback, can minimize apprehensions or reactions to the latter’s delivery, such as hurt feelings, dissent, friction, and so on.


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David Hain's curator insight, June 7, 6:27 AM

Feedforward - worth considering as a development technique. Exercise example here.

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Delegation Is an Art (and Here Are 9 Simple Ways to Do It Better)

Delegation Is an Art (and Here Are 9 Simple Ways to Do It Better) | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

When you lead others, it is important to know that there is an art to delegating. While some leaders think it takes too much of their time and attention to delegate work to their people, there's a big upside to this process. If done correctly, you will find that your staff are more productive and happier as a result. When your people know you trust them enough to delegate an important task, it boosts their motivation to get the job done. 

 

It is a sign of greatness when a leader has the ability to enable their employees to get things done. One research study showed that 53 percent of business owners believe that they can grow their business by more than 20 percent if they only delegate 10 percent of their workload to someone else. That's huge.


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mandychen's curator insight, June 1, 9:21 AM
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HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, June 6, 1:02 AM

Have a look at this great article about delegation of tasks that I found on scoopit. I thought I should share it.

phutungtoyo's comment, July 1, 4:04 AM
http://phutunggapinter.com/vi/shops/Ac-quy-GS/
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5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance

5 ways you can use visualization to achieve top performance | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
I’m a hard-nosed realist who used to look at things like visualization as "woo woo" New Age. Little did I know at the time that I could use visualization to achieve top performance and point to solid science to explain why it worked. Achieving my goal was about more than work and discipline; it was also about physiology.


Whenever we use visualization to achieve top performance, our brain releases a neurotransmitter called dopamine. That is the chemical that becomes active when we encounter situations that are linked to rewards from the past. Dopamine enables us to not only see rewards but also to move toward them. So every time we visualize our achievement, our brain stores that information as a success.


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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 6:05 AM

We all have stuff we are scared of. I learned the power of visualisation when I was coached before a walk on hot coals. This brief piece from @LaRaeQuy puts the science and process very well.

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Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It.

Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It. | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
A growing body of research is making it clear that learners are made, not born. Through the deliberate use of practice and dedicated strategies to improve our ability to learn, we can all develop expertise faster and more effectively. In short, we can all get better at getting better.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 11, 3:06 AM

People/teams/organisations who learn better and faster typically outdo those who don't focus on learning. And learning well can be learned...

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Your Seventh Sense: Beyond Mindfulness  

Your Seventh Sense: Beyond Mindfulness   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

In this article, Willian Duggan explores the practice of Free Your Mind, a way to turn stress into strategy and to turn negative thoughts into strategic thinking. This article shows how to cultivate rational thoughts and positive energy by harnessing the science and practice of the “seventh sense.” In his own words, “you need more than meditation to calm your mind.”

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The Build-Measure-Learn Feedback Loop  

The Build-Measure-Learn Feedback Loop   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The Build-Measure-Learn feedback loop is a technique that helps you to realise when you've got things wrong, before it's too late to turn initial failure into eventual success

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The Art of the Transition

The Art of the Transition | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Transitions, the flexible moments between changes, simultaneously shape the clarity of an ending and the quality of the next beginning. And although the “big” transitions at work naturally capture our focus and attention (e.g., leaving one organization to start a new job at another), we engage in numerous microtransitions every day. Examples include switching from answering emails to writing a report; wrapping up a face-to-face meeting and then dialing into a conference call; and getting up to grab coffee, only to find yourself having an unplanned hallway conversation with a colleague.

Collectively, these small, malleable moments have the potential to accelerate our productivity or bog it down with inefficiencies, distractions, and false starts. Being in conscious control of your transitions allows you to navigate your day with greater efficiency.

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How To Turn Conflict into an Energy Source

How To Turn Conflict into an Energy Source | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Ask anyone about “conflict” and you’ll most likely hear negative descriptions such as: painful, damaging, draining, upsetting, disrespectful, demeaning and relationship-destroying.
Most people dread conflict and can’t imagine how they could turn conflict into an energy source because they don’t understand what it really is.
Conflict is simply energy – the energy caused by a gap between what you want and what you are experiencing. The energy of conflict can be misused in “drama” or it can be harnessed to create something positive and useful.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 22, 4:33 AM

Healthy conflict is invariably a good thing - took me too long to realise this! Good article on why here.

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Time Management - 5 Easy Steps to Increase Productivity

Time Management - 5 Easy Steps to Increase Productivity | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Time management is a skill you can easily master. This simple, 5-step time management plan will improve your time management skills, help you identify and eliminate time-wasters, and get more things done each day.

Via Daniel Watson
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Daniel Watson's curator insight, April 12, 2:05 AM

 

Time is finite. How we make use of the time we have available determines whether or not we succeed in life and business. As a business owner or manager, you face more challenges than most, when it comes to being as productive as possible. This excellent article, not only provides great advice on how to more effectively manage your time, it also provides tools to assist you on the path to becoming more productive.

Yanglish's curator insight, April 16, 4:41 AM
Smart tips to increase productivity.
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7 Ways to Use Office Politics Positively  

7 Ways to Use Office Politics Positively   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Use these seven tips for "winning fairly" at office politics, by understanding and building your influence and networks, and neutralizing negativity.

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6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient

6 Easy Steps To Make You More Resilient | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Change frightens us because it is a voyage into the unknown. Ironically, since the unknown forces us to adapt to new circumstances, it is also the place where we can develop new talents and strengths. If we are resilient, we can embark on a journey that moves us beyond self-limiting beliefs, boredom, and lack of confidence.

Change is the great dream of every heart because it moves us closer to our full potential. To refuse the challenge that comes with change can be a great act of self-neglect.

If you have mental toughness, you will do anything to break the cycle of behavior that disempowers you. To push beyond your limits takes a resilient mind. It requires you to move into your discomfort zone and cross a threshold that awakens a variety of emotions such as confusion, fear, excitement, sadness—and yes, dreams.

There should always be a healthy tension between the life we have settled for and the potential that still calls us.

Here are 6 easy steps to make you more resilient:

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David Hain's curator insight, June 26, 6:28 AM

FBI veteran LaRae Quy on how to develop the resilience we all need.

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How the Word 'Should' Divides and Disappoints

How the Word 'Should' Divides and Disappoints | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

“Dave should have picked me to be on that special project team. He’s my boss. He should have known I wanted to participate.”

Should. Such a limiting word. It gifts us with frustration and anger.

“I should have been asked to lead the discussion group. They should have known that I’m good at that kind of work.”

Should. It leads us down paths of disappointment and resentment.

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5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations

5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
According to the 2015 Employee Trends Report by Quantum Workplace, one of the biggest areas of concern for team members is that there is often not open and honest communication with managers.  So why is this? Why does miscommunication pervade at least 50% of business conversations? Is technology to blame or are there some other dynamics at work.

In my experience, yes technology does have a part to play. Emails and text can be taken out of context and without any supporting body language to back up the conversation they can fuel anxiety and in some cases, escalate beyond repair, this is why face to face conversations are so much more effective.

And yet face to face conversations too can lead to miscommunication especially when the manager fails to lead the conversation or is fearful about discussing the subject. Take for example if a manager needs to have a difficult conversation with team members, say about their performance. If the manager is not feeling confident in having the conversation they might not articulate clearly the problem and so the team member leaves confused about what they have done wrong. This then causes the situation to escalate and before long both parties become frustrated. I call these conversations Courageous Conversations as they require the manager to be ruthlessly honest and transparent, often saying things that no-one has said in the past.

Having a clear framework for navigating these Courageous Conversations is essential to help managers approach the situation with confidence and certainty. This is why I developed the 6 C’s to Successful Courageous Conversations Framework.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 13, 5:51 AM

Useful framework for putting the fish on the table! if you don't, you may soon notice a funny smell getting in the way of productivity...

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5 Common Complaints About Meetings and What to Do About Them

5 Common Complaints About Meetings and What to Do About Them | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

We all complain about meetings. We have too many. They’re a waste of time. Nothing gets done. These complaints often have merit, but they are so broad that they’re difficult to argue with and harder to address.

There are specific complaints that can be tackled, however. When I ask people in the workshops I lead what they most want help with, five issues consistently come up:

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Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?

Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving? | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

It’s possible to fake emotional intelligence. Similar to knockoffs of luxury watches or handbags, there are emotions and actions that look like the real thing but really aren’t. With the best of intentions, I’ve seen smart leaders charge into sensitive interactions armed with what they believed was a combination of deep empathy, attuned listening, and self-awareness but was, in fact, a way to serve their own emotional needs. It’s important to learn to spot these forgeries, especially if you’re the forger.

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Delegate with Clarity, Commitment, and Accountability

Delegate with Clarity, Commitment, and Accountability | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

 
When business leaders learn how to delegate, the results can be amazing. Yet most leaders struggle with delegation. Reasons? Although it’s a huge time and energy saver in the long run, effective delegation requires an investment of time and energy in the short run. It also takes a dose of humility. Occupying the corner office doesn’t mean your ideas, talents, energy, and so on are superior to everyone else’s.

Effective delegators take pride and satisfaction in their ability to delegate. As former president Ronald Reagan said, “Surround yourself with the best people you can find, delegate authority, and don’t interfere as long as the policy you’ve decided upon is being carried out.”

To delegate effectively, you must do so with clarity, commitment, and accountability. Vagueness about the work being delegated gets you nowhere. Commitment comes from conveying to the “delegatee” a sense of ownership and purpose. And accountability runs in both directions: Are we keeping our respective commitments and are we measuring results?

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How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You

How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

We’ve all been there: those times you need to argue your point of view to someone who you know disagrees with you. You immediately go to your keyboard and start to type out that 280-character tweet, the Facebook reply, or a paragraphs-long email. Surely the reason, logic, and sheer power of your written words will convince whoever it is who disagrees with you to see your point of view? But new research suggests these written arguments may not be the best approach.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 1:43 AM

Research suggests oral, not written, communication works best.

Yanglish's curator insight, May 14, 10:27 AM
...written arguments may not be the best approach.
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Authenticity: How to be genuine when you present

Authenticity: How to be genuine when you present | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Critical to your success as a presenter is recognising that your audience will be judging you from the moment you stand in front of them. They cannot help it and they do not consciously know they are doing it but judging you they are.

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Feedback in Branching Scenarios: What Works for Novices, Experts, and Everyone –

Feedback in Branching Scenarios: What Works for Novices, Experts, and Everyone – | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
When we provide feedback in branching scenarios, we have several questions to consider. Should we provide consequences (intrinsic feedback) or coaching (instructional feedback)? Should we provide immediate feedback or delayed feedback? What works for novices versus experts? Intrinsic and Instructional Feedback In Scenario-based e-Learning: Evidence-Based Guidelines for Online Workforce Learning, Ruth Clark recommends combining intrinsic…

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5 ways to use psychology to make your colleagues like you more

5 ways to use psychology to make your colleagues like you more | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Being well-liked by your colleagues will increase your likelihood of promotion, and will make your job more enjoyable.
Popular people are often good listeners, especially if they ask follow-up questions and exhibit friendly body language.
Studies show that apologizing for bad weather or traffic can make a colleague feel more positively towards you, as it suggests a sense of empathy.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 25, 12:48 PM

Likeability is such an important predictor of success (clearly not the only one). Some interesting tips here for getting people onside. Health Warning - people spot a fake a mile off, so it's the authenticity, not the technique, that counts!

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8 Ways to Be an Exceptional Listener

8 Ways to Be an Exceptional Listener | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Good listening skills are important for growing your business relationships, but most people spend more time talking than listening. Here are eight ways to develop the skills that will make you an exceptional listener.

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Yanglish's comment, April 16, 4:21 AM
Thanks for valuable recommendations.
Yanglish's curator insight, April 16, 4:22 AM
This is good to know.
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Finding Your Allies  

Finding Your Allies   | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Things are so much easier when people help and support one another at work. Find out how to build your own support network.

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