learning and reading styles
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How we will read series of interviews

How we will read series of interviews | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

“How We Will Read,” an interview series exploring the future of books from the perspectives of publishers, writers, and intellectuals. Interviews with Paul Carr, Baratunde Thurston, Maria Popova,  Clay Shirky, Clive Thompson, Richard Nash, Kevin Kelly,  Rian Chapman, Craig Mod, Laura Miller and Maud Newton.

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Wiley: Interactive Open Educational Resources: A Guide to Finding, Choosing, and Using What's Out There to Transform College Teaching - John D. Shank

Wiley: Interactive Open Educational Resources: A Guide to Finding, Choosing, and Using What's Out There to Transform College Teaching - John D. Shank | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

Sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), this one-of-a-kind book demonstrates the best tools, resources, and techniques for discovering, selecting, and integrating interactive open educational resources (OERs) into the teaching and learning process. The author examines many of the best repositories and digital library websites for finding high quality materials, explaining in depth the best practices for effectively searching these repositories and the various methods for evaluating, selecting, and integrating the resources into the instructor’s curriculum and course assignments, as well as the institution’s learning management system.


Via John Shank
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Graham Nuthall: The Hidden Lives of Learners - YouTube

Mooie lezing over ‘The Hidden Lives of Learners’ van Jan Tishauer #rEDAdamescription
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English hubs aim to boost child literacy

English hubs aim to boost child literacy | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
The government is to set up 35 "English hubs" across the country in an attempt to improve child literacy.

The hubs are among a raft of new measures announced by Education Secretary Justine Greening.

A £5.7m investment will aim to boost literacy skills in 469 schools, whilst a £7.7m hopes to develop high quality teaching resources.

The schemes form part of the government's social mobility action plan, launched last month.

'In school, but learning nothing'
Why reading with dad matters
The hubs will be set up by a new Centre of Excellence for Literacy Teaching, with a focus on raising standards in schools,
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How the Internet Has Changed the Way We Learn

How the Internet Has Changed the Way We Learn | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

The millennial generation is the biggest benefactor of the internet explosion. It is safe to conclude that the late stage of the millennials is entirely dependent on the web. The average millennial is equipped with at least one internet-enabled device. The Internet of Things concept, which connects several devices to communicate, makes a huge percentage of generation Y digitally driven in performing mundane tasks. The benefits of the internet’s rapid growth have trickled to the youngest generation; school going children. The digital education culture intensifies with age as individuals realize the importance of the internet in making substantial educational progress.

Availability of a Vast Array of Information and Educators
Wikipedia and Google Search are inevitably a student’s best companion. It could take hours to compile information from the traditional library scavenging. The internet is a literal concentration of billions of data bytes, accessible with a serial of clicks. Wikipedia is especially a powerful connectivity platform that links the profiles of experts on informational web pages, as is other newly developed channels such as LinkedIn. TedX has a flood of creative entrepreneurs who are changing the world’s thinking. Some of the explored topics highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the current educational system.


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Learning styles

• No two children are alike • No two children learn in the identical way • An enriched environment for one student is not necessarily enriched for another • 

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No, you aren't a 'visual' learner

No, you aren't a 'visual' learner | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
It's a damning indictment of our collective resistance to truth that the point of this article still has to be restated, yet again. Amazingly, 93% of the general public and 76% of educators still erroneously believe that we should be taught in ways that match our learning styles. I assume this is so in the US - unless things have changed recently, the percentages, for teachers at least, are even worse in some other countries where the idea has been pushed harder from the top down, such as the UK and Netherlands. To be quite clear: this belief is not…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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NLafferty's curator insight, September 29, 2017 4:40 AM
My learning style should be whatever I need it to be ... spot on!
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Dedicated reading time needs to be at the heart of the school day

Dedicated reading time needs to be at the heart of the school day | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
A study examining literacy progression across the UK recently hit the headlines by comparing, for the first time, improvements in reading between students in the four home nations.
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5 effective teaching tips for students with literacy challenges via MERIS STANSBURY

5 effective teaching tips for students with literacy challenges via MERIS STANSBURY | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Expert discusses teachers’ successful techniques in helping students with literacy challenges—including dyslexia.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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5 Teaching Strategies to Facilitate Independent Reading

5 Teaching Strategies to Facilitate Independent Reading | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Some golden teaching strategies to consider for making independent reading successful for your students.
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21 st Century Educational Technology and Learning

21 st Century Educational Technology and Learning | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Welcome to the second article in a series devoted to grounding PBL in the standards.  As you explore the ideas in this article I do hope you can see that our content standards provide a wonderful opportunity for our students to do, a concept at the foundation of PBL. Before reading, please take a moment to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and join me on twitter at (mjgormans). Taking that moment ensures that we can continue to network. Also, please share this post with others and even provide a re-tweet.  Most of all, thanks for being one of those over 25,000 visitors a month,over 10,000 subscribers, and possibly one of the thousands of educators that have attended my workshops at schools and conferences. Also, remember that I can come to your conference or school district and provide engaging, authentic, affordable, and purposeful professional development. Please check my Booking Page to see how I could be part of your school PD or Conference plans. Thanks so much.  Michael Gorman (mjgormans@gmail.com).
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Using Art to Teach Critical Thinking

Using Art to Teach Critical Thinking | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

Art is one of the most underutilized resources in today’s ELA classroom. The Roman poet Horace claimed, “A picture is a poem without words” meaning art and written word are different mediums of expression. Art offers students a break from written words while continuing to develop the same skill set needed to be successful readers through challenging students to think both critically and analytically.

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Technology in the Classroom: How, Why to Use Podcasts

Technology in the Classroom: How, Why to Use Podcasts | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
A podcast is a topic-specific digital stream of audio files (in some cases, video or PDF also) that can be downloaded to a computer or a wide variety of media devices. They are funny, entertaining, educational, often short, and rarely boring. They can cover news, current events, history, or pretty much anything the creator would like. When you subscribe, each new episode is automatically downloaded to your device, to be played at your convenience. You can play the entire stream or select an individual episode as part of your technology in the classroom arsenal. Here’s how to use technology in the classroom podcasts to enhance your class.
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Codie Bower's curator insight, February 16, 2017 4:58 PM
Podcasts are AWEAOME tools for the classroom!
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To foster a love of art in children, we must teach it at primary school | Teacher Network | The Guardian

To foster a love of art in children, we must teach it at primary school | Teacher Network | The Guardian | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

To foster a love of art in children, we must teach it at primary school
If we want children to value art, we must give them access to it early on in life. Here’s how primary schools can make space for creativity

For schools that find it difficult to dedicate an hour a week to art, teachers should still aim to include short bursts of creativity in the school day. 
It’s no secret that arts subjects are increasingly being deprioritised in many schools, and that there’s a fall in the number of pupils taking arts subjects at GCSE. Yet the arts matter, not only to individual learning but to the UK as a whole: the creative industries currently contribute £84.1bn a year to the economy.

Enthusiasm for art should really start at primary school – by the time students reach year seven, attitudes about what matters in education will have already been established. The national curriculum for art and design is sparse and leaves a lot open to interpretation, meaning that provision varies greatly between schools. With pressures on pupil progress for reading, writing and maths, it’s not uncommon for a whole term to pass without one art lesson.

Creativity can be taught to anyone. So why are we leaving it to private schools?

Most of the primary teachers I’ve spoken to say they miss teaching art. Even those who don’t think of themselves as artistically minded acknowledge that pupils are missing out on a vital part of education and life if art is excluded. So what can primary schools do to offer more opportunities for creativity? There are a number of small improvements that can make all the difference.

Map out a curriculum for the whole school
Most teachers won’t have the time to develop a comprehensive art curriculum by themselves. But if school leadership creates time for staff to work together and share ideas, it’s possible to create something worthwhile.

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On the Great Joy of Reading Aloud

On the Great Joy of Reading Aloud | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
In 2013, The Guardian suggested reading aloud was coming back into fashion. That might be an overstatement. But, in our family's life, it fills an emotional and entertainment niche that nothing else does.
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Minecraft Can Transform Your World Language Classroom

Minecraft Can Transform Your World Language Classroom | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

Do you speak Minecraft? If you don’t, I highly recommend taking a minute to ask your students about this popular computer game — now with an education edition. They will likely passionately describe adventures they’ve taken in this block-based open world, where the only limit to what they’re able to create is their imagination.

As a world language teacher, I’m always trying to find ways to leverage digital learning strategies to immerse students in the Spanish language and find engaging, meaningful experiences to be able to hone their language skills.

Game-based learning using Minecraft gave me the opportunity to design worlds where students can work and play together while communicating in Spanish.

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'Learning To Do, Doing To Learn': Why Simply Training Isn't Enough

'Learning To Do, Doing To Learn': Why Simply Training Isn't Enough | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

Global corporations, non-profit organizations, booster clubs, sports teams, small businesses — while different in design and objectives, they all have one common goal: achieve results. While the role of human resources varies as much within these different organizational structures as do their individual missions, there exists a common element in the relentless pursuit of results that lead to greater profit, more members and increased awareness. That bond is the organization’s need for a culture rich in innovation and rooted in learning.

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Learning theories and online learning | Tony Bates

Learning theories and online learning | Tony Bates | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Chapter 3 of my open textbook on ‘Teaching in a Digital Age‘ is about theory and practice in teaching for a digital age, which I am still in the process of writing. I have to admit that I approached writing about learning theories with some dread. In particular I was concerned (in order of dread) that:
this will appear incredibly boring/lack originality, because it has been done so many times before by other, more qualified authors (but then those that already know this stuff can easily skip it)
I’m not sure that theories of learning actually drive teaching (although surely an understanding of how students learn should do so)
I would have to deal with connectivism somehow, and I am certainly not an expert on that topic – but maybe that might be an advantage in bringing it to the attention of people who have previously shown no interest in it, and how it differs from previous theories
it could be argued that past learning theories are made irrelevant by digital technologies (and I certainly don’t agree with that point of view.)
In the end, I can’t see how a discussion of learning theories can be avoided. Unless readers of the book have this basic understanding of the different views of learning, they will not be in a good position to make choices, especially regarding the use of technology for teaching and learning. In particular, I see a danger of becoming dogmatic and blinkered by unchallenged assumptions about the nature of learning that results from not exploring alternative theories. But lastly, as Kurt Lewin said, there is nothing more practical than a good theory. A good theory helps us make informed decisions in areas of uncertainty. So, I am sharing here my first draft with you. Please note this is just part of the whole chapter, which also includes the following:
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#InternationalLiteracyDay: Promoting literacy to enshrine positive youth development | IOL Lifestyle

#InternationalLiteracyDay: Promoting literacy to enshrine positive youth development | IOL Lifestyle | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Cape Town - International Literacy Day will be celebrated around the world today (Sep 8), to put a spotlight on the high levels of illiteracy and how reading and writing can empower people.

Literacy is a human right - an essential tool in realising peace, promoting democracy, eradicating poverty, achieving gender equality and ensuring sustainable development.

Today the Mustadafin Foundation, under the theme “The power of reading”, invites parents to come and listen to their children recite stories and poetry at the Tafelsig Library in Mitchells Plain in Cape Town.

Foundation director Ghairunisa Johnstone-Cassiem said: “We firmly believe that literacy and education is the cornerstone in building a positive future. We strive to provide every human being with skills and opportunities to overcome their circumstances, to become agents for positive change through education.”
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3 Misconceptions About Innovation in Education

3 Misconceptions About Innovation in Education | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
3 Misconceptions About Innovation in Education April 30, 2017 by George 4 Comments “Innovation” is one of the most used words in education right now. It is something that I am obviously passionate about, hence the reason I wrote the book, “The Innovator’s Mindset”. I am scared that we use the word “innovation” in the wrong way when there is power to this type of thinking. Words do not become “buzzwords” because they are used too frequently; they become “buzzwords” when they are used frequently in an incorrect manner. Here are some misconceptions about the word that we need to dispell to protect “innovation” in education from becoming a buzzword. 
1. Innovation is about how you use technology   read further
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5 Teaching Strategies to Facilitate Independent Reading

5 Teaching Strategies to Facilitate Independent Reading | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
I’ve often told my students I’m never disappointed when “All we did was read” today. Reading is a critical attribute of a lifelong learner, yet many students seem to learn that reading is just something teachers make you do in school. The idea of reading for pleasure or reading for passion is foreign to many students when the only reading they know is the reading the teacher assigns. Independent reading teaching strategies can help change that. Instead of students reading because they have to, independent reading teaching strategies give students a chance to read because they want to. Instead of the teacher selecting and assigning reading material, the constraints are loosened and students are given the chance to have control. If you’re interested in teaching strategies that facilitate independent reading in your classroom, here are some golden guidelines to consider for making it successful experience for your students.

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Tackling the ‘learning styles’ myth

Tackling the ‘learning styles’ myth | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it

You’ve probably heard the claim that you learn better when information is presented in your preferred ‘learning style’. Where did this neuromyth come from? Dr Tanya Vaughan explains.


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Is Technology Holding Students Back? | Edudemic

Is Technology Holding Students Back? | Edudemic | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Using technology in the classroom comes with a host of benefits. But can technology do more harm than good when it comes to helping students succeed?
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Competency-Based Learning for Teachers: Can micro-credentials reboot professional development?

Competency-Based Learning for Teachers: Can micro-credentials reboot professional development? | learning and reading styles | Scoop.it
Remember merit badges? The reward for kids who master new skills has been rebooted—for their teachers.

So-called “micro-credentials” work a lot like scouting badges. Teachers complete a specific activity to develop a critical competency for their role, and earn a micro-credential based on showing mastery of the skill. They can collect micro-credentials to document growing expertise and share their accomplishments in the classroom.

This targeted training is in stark contrast to traditional, strikingly ineffective teacher professional development (PD). With its focus on seat time—awarding credit for showing up to workshops, conferences, or classes—formal PD has ignored whether teachers actually learn new skills, apply them, and improve student outcomes. And with its reliance on generalized, off-the-shelf programs, most formal PD does not target the specific skills or expertise an individual teacher may need to improve her practice.

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