Vocabulary
821 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

The best way to improve your English vocabulary - YouTube

Learn about the best way to improve your English vocabulary. You'll also discover two additional benefits (other than a larger vocabulary) of applying this w...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

7 Teaching Tips to Influence the Bright Minds of Tomorrow

7 Teaching Tips to Influence the Bright Minds of Tomorrow | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
So you want to be a teacher? Prepare to inspire your students with these top teaching tips.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary

Vocabulary | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Vocabulary plays an important part in learning to read. Beginning readers must use the words they hear orally to make sense of the words they see in print. Kids who hear more words spoken at home learn more words and enter school with better vocabularies. This larger vocabulary pays off exponentially as a child progresses through school.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

26 Weird English Words from A to Z - Voxy Blog

26 Weird English Words from A to Z - Voxy Blog | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Have you ever worn winklepickers or salopettes? Is the saying about French women and their oxters true? Do your friends complain that you bibble too much? Have you ever experienced zoanthropy and been convinced you were an elephant? If you’re confused as to how to answer any – or all – of these questions, never …
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Glossarissimo!
Scoop.it!

(MULTI) (€) - New Theatre Words | OISTAT

(MULTI) (€) - New Theatre Words | OISTAT | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

"The best example accomplished through the OISTAT network of international artists. New Theatre Words is an illustrated international vocabulary. There are three versions of the New Theater Words (Standard), including the Northern Europe Edition, Central Europe Edition, and World Edition, covering a total of 24 languages in different collections.The books are of pocket-size (4 3/8" X 6 5/8"; 11cm X 17 cm).

New Theatre Words Central Europe Edition:
English, French, German, Dutch, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Polish, Slovakian, Bulgarian, Russian, and Serbian

New Theatre Words Northern Europe Edition:
English, French, German, Swedish, Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Latvian, and Russian

New Theatre Words World Edition:
English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, and Russian"


Via Stefano KaliFire
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Edtech PK-12
Scoop.it!

"Vocapic" Is A Multilingual Site For Learning English, Spanish or French Vocabulary

"Vocapic" Is A Multilingual Site For Learning English, Spanish or French Vocabulary | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Vocapic is a simple and free bilingual site that lets you learn either English, Spanish or French vocabulary. First click on the top right to indicate the language you speak now, then move down to ...

Via Cindy Rudy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Wordsmiths universe
Scoop.it!

Folderol | UnusedWords | Unused Words

Folderol | UnusedWords | Unused Words | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Sometimes, being a linguist seems much like being a detective and this is one of those times. Where can we find the same stem? What words did same meaning receive in related languages? Where was it first used?

Via Aurora Humarán
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Unused Words - Discover a new word every day

Unused Words - Discover a new word every day | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

This is a great resource if you want to amaze people with the depth aand complexity of your vocabulary. Although it is called 'Unused words', many of the words are still in use. The site gives some interesting information about the history and origin of th words too.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Unused Words
Scoop.it!

Duncical

Duncical | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

http://unusedwords.com/2012/10/11/duncical/ Definition: stupid, marked by the lack of intellectual acuity. Pronunciation: DUHN-si-kuhl Origin John Duns Scouts is known to be one of the three most important philosopher-theologians of the High Middle Ages and is considered to have influenced the catholic church as well as secular... #Adjectives, #Featured , #Duncical, #Stupid


Via Ununsed Words
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Unused Words
Scoop.it!

Venial

Venial | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

http://unusedwords.com/2013/12/15/venial/ Definition: any sin that does not deprive the sinner’s soul from the afterlife Pronunciation: VENyal Synonyms: pardonable, forgivable, excusable Origin The Latin noun of venia is forgiveness or pardon. Old French loaned the later Latin venialis meaning pardonable and turned it into the word’s ve... #Adjectives, #Featured , #Excusable, #Forgivable, #Pardonable


Via Ununsed Words
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
The educator becomes a connected educator and through sharing, is an active participant and contributor to the connected educator movement.

Being a connected educator means connecting with other teachers to exchange ideas, improve your teaching practice, and in turn, make a change in education. It is only through being connected that we can collaborate and help to foster learning for the 21st century and beyond. (Being a Connected Educator)

The gap between what is and what could be in education is larger than it ever has  been.  I believe this is largely due to technology and the ability to establish global connections because of social media. Educators are more connected and more aware about education trends than any time in the history of public education.

Imagine how education could be transformed if all educators use their own personal, often passion-driven voices. The bottom line is that if any individual educator believes there are flaws in the education, that it can be done better, then s/he has the responsibility to say something. I reaching the point that I am starting to believe it is a moral imperative for educators to share what they know to be true with other educators; and with administrators, students’ families, community members, politicians . . . the larger global society.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 31, 2015 9:34 PM

I don't think this is a new responsibility, but it is important.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, April 1, 2015 10:50 AM

J'aime ce post parce qu'effectivement, tout prof devient de facto une source pour les autres en matière de connaissance. Pourquoi pas le partager ?

Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, April 6, 2015 9:50 AM

You'd be hard-pressed to find a better way to pay it forward than through shared learning... education.

Rescooped by Vocabmonk from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

Earth Day - resources from Waterloo Catholic District School Board

Earth Day - resources from Waterloo Catholic District School Board | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

ESLGold.com - ESL English as a Second Language free materials for teaching and study. The best resources to help you learn English online

ESLGold.com - ESL English as a Second Language free materials for teaching and study. The best resources to help you learn English online | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
ESL, English as a second language, teaching materials and resources for speaking, study and learning. TESOL teachers, schools, and programs, aprender a hablar Inglés, تعلم التحدث باللغة الإنجليزية, 学会说英语, matutong magsalita ng ingles, apprendre à parler anglais, अंग्रेजी बोलना सीख, Aṅgrējī bōlanā sīkha, kawm hais lus english, belajar untuk berbicara bahasa Inggris, imparare a parlare inglese, 英語を話すことを学ぶ, Eigo o hanasu koto o manabu, 영어로 이야기하는 학습 yeong-eolo iyagihaneun hagseub, aprender a falar Inglês, học cách nói tiếng Anh
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

English Vocabulary Word List - Top 3000 US English Words #1

Vocabulary word lists and various games, puzzles and quizzes to help you study them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

English Vocabulary List - Learn Frequently Used Most Common Words

Most frequently used vocabulary words by Nouns, Verbs, Adjectives, Pronouns, Adverbs, & Prepositions. Created by comparing against multiple corpus & hundreds of live dialogs.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from #BetterLeadership
Scoop.it!

Leaders Know Words Matter - Leadership, Sales & Life

Leaders Know Words Matter - Leadership, Sales & Life | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Great leaders know their words matter. The words you use can tear down or build up. Words are powerful. Some words are better left unsaid.

Via AlGonzalezinfo
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:00 AM

Leaders must be consistent with their words to consistently motivate others. It is so easy to do the opposite...

 

From the post:

 

What Words Can Do

 The words you use can lift the people you lead up or tear them down. You can be a hammer all day and pretend everyone’s a nail. Or, you can….

 

~Encourage

~Build trust

~Create vision

~Show empathy

~Provide brutal honesty

~Lift spirits

~Instigate action

~Solidify meaning

~Express sympathy

~Exemplify kindness

~Rally an organization, team or department

Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

A Loss For Words--Can Dying Languages Be Saved? | Judith Thurman | The New Yorker

A Loss For Words--Can Dying Languages Be Saved? | Judith Thurman | The New Yorker | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

It is a singular fate to be the last of one’s kind. That is the fate of the men and women, nearly all of them elderly, who are—like Marie Wilcox, of California; Gyani Maiya Sen, of Nepal; Verdena Parker, of Oregon; and Charlie Mungulda, of Australia—the last known speakers of a language: Wukchumni, Kusunda, Hupa, and Amurdag, respectively. But a few years ago, in Chile, I met Joubert Yanten Gomez, who told me he was “the world’s only speaker of Selk’nam.” He was twenty-one.

Yanten Gomez, who uses the tribal name Keyuk, grew up modestly, in Santiago. His father, Blas Yanten, is a woodworker, and his mother, Ivonne Gomez Castro, practices traditional medicine. As a young girl, she was mocked at school for her mestizo looks, so she hesitated to tell her children—Keyuk and an older sister—about their ancestry. They hadn’t known that their maternal relatives descended from the Selk’nam, a nomadic tribe of unknown origin that settled in Tierra del Fuego. The first Europeans to encounter the Selk’nam, in the sixteenth century, were astonished by their height and their hardiness—they braved the frigid climate by coating their bodies with whale fat. The tribe lived mostly undisturbed until the late eighteen-hundreds, when an influx of sheep ranchers and gold prospectors who coveted their land put bounties on their heads. (One hunter boasted that he had received a pound sterling per corpse, redeemable with a pair of ears.) The survivors of the Selk’nam Genocide, as it is called—a population of about four thousand was reduced to some three hundred—were resettled on reservations run by missionaries. The last known fluent speaker of the language, Angela Loij, a laundress and farmer, died forty years ago.

Many children are natural mimics, but Keyuk could imitate speech like a mynah. His father, who is white, had spent part of his childhood in the Arauco region, which is home to the Mapuche, Chile’s largest native community, and he taught Keyuk their language, Mapudungun. The boy, a bookworm and an A student, easily became fluent. A third-grade research project impassioned him about indigenous peoples, and Ivonne, who descends from a line of shamans, took this as a sign that his ancestors were speaking through him. When she told him of their heritage, Keyuk vowed that he would master Selk’nam and also, eventually, Yagán—the nearly extinct language of a neighboring people in the far south—reckoning that he could pass them down to his children and perhaps reseed the languages among the tribes’ descendants. At fourteen, he travelled with his father to Puerto Williams, a town in Chile’s Antarctic province that calls itself “the world’s southernmost city,” to meet Cristina Calderón, the last native Yagán speaker. She subsequently tutored him by phone.

If it is lonely to be the last of anything, the distinction has a mythic romance: the last emperor, the last of the Just, the last of the Mohicans. Keyuk’s precocity enhanced his mystique. A Chilean television station flew him to Tierra del Fuego as part of a series, “Sons of the Earth,” that focussed on the country’s original inhabitants. He was interviewed, at sixteen, by the Financial Times. A filmmaker who knew him put us in touch, and we met at a café in Santiago.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

3 Thematic-Based Vocabulary Learning Websites | TESOL Blog

3 Thematic-Based Vocabulary Learning Websites | TESOL Blog | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Elena Shvidko shares three online resources to help your beginning English language learners acquire vocabulary—in class or independently.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vocabmonk
Scoop.it!

Unused Words

Unused Words | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

This is a fab literacy site where you can find interesting and rare English words. Browse for words to make children's work stand out from the crowd and play 'guess the meaning' with your class.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Unused Words
Scoop.it!

Gardyloo

Gardyloo | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

http://unusedwords.com/2012/11/15/gardyloo/ Definition: A warning shouted out the window, typically before waste water or otherwise undesirable liquid was thrown out into the street.  It is now used as an interjection, but in familiar speech was once used as a noun. Pronunciation:  garh- di-lu Origin From the French phrase, “Garde de l’e... #Featured, #Nouns , #Water, #Window


Via Ununsed Words
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Unused Words
Scoop.it!

Daedal

Daedal | Vocabulary | Scoop.it

http://unusedwords.com/2013/11/27/daedal/ Definition: skillful, artistic Pronunciation: DE-dal Synonyms: complex, elaborate, intricate Origin: Introduced to the English language in the 1610s, daedal derives from the Latin ‘daedalus’ and the Greek ‘daidalos’ meaning skilful or cunningly wrought. Why this word? Because of the above ‘cunn... #Adjectives, #Featured , #Daedalus, #Icarus


Via Ununsed Words
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vocabmonk from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Wisdom of words

Wisdom of words | Vocabulary | Scoop.it
A satirist, columnist, feminist, literary critic, translator and media presenter, Mrunalini has 15 published books to her credit. Also a professor of Comparative Literature in Telugu University, Hyderabad, she is well known for her Telugu translations of R K Narayan’s Malgudi Days and Gulzar’s Dhuan. Excerpts from an interview:

You wear many hats — that of a short-story writer, translator, critic, feminist and a radio and television host. Which of these roles do you enjoy most?

Obviously, I enjoy all of the above. But, if I have to make a choice, I would say radio is my first love. I have loved every moment behind the microphone. I feel I communicated best on radio, where I saw no one and no one saw me. Having said that, I also enjoy all the other roles. In fact, some of them overlap with the others. I am a feminist in the sense that I have lived life on my terms, enjoying freedom with all its responsibilities.

Regarding television, I do love the recognition I receive as a television host. Some of my shows on women have, I believe, changed the perspective of women, and on women, too. I have become a counsellor for women mainly as a result of what I say on television.

Your translations of ‘Malgudi Days’ and ‘Dhuan’ have been critically acclaimed. What is your criteria for choosing books for translation?

Frankly speaking, I have not chosen those books; they chose me. I mean, Sahitya Akademi asked me if I can translate Gulzar and I jumped at the idea, having loved his work both as a lyricist and a director all these years. Again, I have always been a fan of R K Narayan, and when a Bengaluru-based publication, after having read my translation of Robin Sharma’s The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, asked me to translate Malgudi Days, I was happy. Some renowned short fiction writers in Telugu have told me how much they enjoyed Malgudi Days in Telugu and I was glad I could do justice to it. But, it’s true that I do take up translations only if I like the book. I love fiction and would be happy translating it; right now, I have some offers from NBT, hopefully, I will chose some good ones. 

What are the challenges you face during translation? Does the reputation of the writer of the original work overwhelm you?

Translation, as most people would tell you, is more difficult than original writing. Here, you have to get into the mind of the original writer and recreate it in another language. I love writers who understate; I love writers who are ironical, and irony, as we all know, is not easily translatable. But I do enjoy getting the feel in between the lines that only a fiction writer can offer. I am very particular about getting the ‘tone’ of the writer, not just the words. My main worry, always, is whether the translation is natural or contrived. I try to make it natural. As for being overwhelmed by the original writers, I can’s say I am. But I would like to bring their peculiarities to my readers; hence, though I myself am a writer, I take care that my style does not intrude into my translation. I prefer retaining the original writers’  style in my translation.

What kind of writing are you focusing on now?

At present, I’m concentrating on literary criticism. My latest collection of essays has just come out. I have two more books of literary criticism lined up. I am also attempting a novel.

You are also a short story writer. How is the short story scene in India today?

Short story is one genre which has not had ups and downs or seasons in all Indian languages. Poetry and novel have had their good and bad phases, but short story has been uniformly good. The best thing about today’s short story scene is that there are many new writers from different backgrounds. Their unique sensibilities and life experiences are showing both in their subjects and language. The richness that comes out of this obviously adds to the value of this genre. My only concern is that sordidness and tragedy are dominating the short story scene at the expense of humour and satire.

You were a part of this year’s Jaipur Lit Fest? Do you think lit fests promote reading?

I am not sure. However, I do think that literary festivals do help people, especially today’s youth, realise that a good book is worth more than 10 sessions in a Personality Development class.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.