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Rescooped by Kim McLean from Learning Futures on I.C.E. - Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship
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Design Thinking Needs To Think Bigger

Design Thinking Needs To Think Bigger | Learning | Scoop.it
“ Systems thinking isn’t new—though it may be unfamiliar to many designers. It’s a mode of analysis that’s been around for decades. But it has newfound relevance for today’s everything-is-networked, Big Data world. Systems thinking is a mind-set—a way of seeing and talking about reality that recognizes the interrelatedness of things. System thinking sees collections of interdependent components as a set of relationships and consequences that are at least as important as the individual components themselves. It emphasizes the emergent properties of the whole that neither arise directly, nor are predictable, from the properties of the parts. Systems thinking can be used to explain and understand everything from inventory changes in a supply chain, to populations of bacteria and their hosts, to the instability in Syria, to the seemingly irrational behavior of certain elected officials. The vocabulary of formal systems thinking is one of causal loops, unintended consequences, emergence, and system dynamics. Practicing systems theorists employ tools such as systemigrams, archetypes, stock and flow diagrams, interpretive structural modeling, and systemic root cause analysis—all of which is beyond the scope of this post. For the purposes of this discussion, I’ll simply introduce the Iceberg Model and briefly discuss two key concepts in systems thinking—emergence and leverage points. ”

Via Kim Flintoff
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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, May 2, 2017 11:42 PM
"Systems thinking is a mind-set—a way of seeing and talking about reality that recognizes the interrelatedness of things."

Embracing complexity is a necessity...
Rescooped by Kim McLean from Digital Delights
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Open Badges Overview

openbadges.org | badgealliance.org @OpenBadges | @badgealliance Email badges@badgealliance.org with any questions

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Kim McLean's insight:
Are people using badges? Are endorsements of skills from colleagues more acceptable? Which is more reliable?
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Rescooped by Kim McLean from Process of Living
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Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models

Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models | Learning | Scoop.it
“ Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models”
Via William J. Tolley
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Eric Paul Meredith, MS, RD, CPT's curator insight, March 8, 2014 6:05 PM

This was a great article about the shift from education to learning.  There were three tenets of connected learning that the author discussed.  The three facets of connected learning are as follows:

 

1) A shift from education to learning. Education is what institutions do, learning is what people do. Digital media enable learning anywhere, anytime; formal learning must also be mobile and just-in-time.

 

2) A shift from consumption of information to participatory learning. Learning happens best when it is rich in social connections, especially when it is peer-based and organized around learners’ interests, enabling them to create as well as consume information.

 

3) A shift from institutions to networks. In the digital age, the fundamental operating and delivery systems are networks, not institutions such as schools, which are one node of many on a young person’s network of learning opportunities. People learn across institutions, so an entire learning network must be supported.

 

In a digital world, every individual could establish a learning network based on their interests and academic pursuits.  Peers, institutions, and the community could join the individual's network and contribute to their learning.

 

These networks would enable a person to collaborate with like minded peers who share the same interests.  Instead of just one institution participating in a student's education, multiple informal and formal entities can provide opportunities to learn in cost effective ways.  Lastly, new media also provides people with the opportunity to demonstrate learning by creating work to share with instructors and members of the networking community.