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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (6/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (6/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Using rigorous problem-solving logic, this blog post series tries to answer whether you should speak of multiple root causes or a single root condition (final part of a series of 6, summarizing the method and the answers coming from this method).

 
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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (4/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (4/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Using rigorous problem-solving logic, this blog post series tries to answer whether you should speak of multiple root causes or a single root condition (part 4 of 6, about the problems of occurrence and non-detection, and systemic problems).

 
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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (2/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (2/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Using rigorous problem-solving logic, this blog post series tries to answer whether you should speak of multiple root causes or a single root condition (part 2 of 6 about necessary conditions and barriers).

 
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Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 3) | Dumontis

Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 3) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

This is the third and last post in a series of three about knowing whether you are on your way to perfect flow. The better your flow, the more profitable your business will be and the more returns it will deliver. But how to know where you stand in terms of flow? And how to evaluate whether you progressed? This series of three post tries to develop two measures – flow velocity and flow smoothness – as the way to evaluate the level of and the progress towards flow. In this third post, I will focus on flow smoothness to complement the flow velocity measure discussed in the second post.

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Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 1) | Dumontis

Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 1) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

There are many approaches and methods that focus on improving flow. Material Requirements Planning (MRP), Drum-Buffer-Rope (DBR) or Simplified-DBR (SDBR), Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP), Quick Response Manufacturing (QRM) and of course Lean’s comprehensive Just-in-Time (JIT) approach share the same objective. In comparing these approaches, however, discussions often concentrate on their inner workings. But they often lack an operationalization of the concept of “flow” which they intend to improve. This series of three post tries to develop two measures – flow velocity and flow smoothness – as the way to evaluate the level of and the progress towards flow.

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Shisa Kanko, a Different Kind of Checklist:

Shisa Kanko, a Different Kind of Checklist: | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Regular readers of my blog know that I am a keen Japanophile. I love learning new things about the cultural nuances of Japan. In today’s post I will be looking at “Shisa Kanko” translated as “point with finger and call”. Perhaps, like many others, when I was the last one to leave my house, I…
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D&M uses lean practices to engage workers - Plastics News

D&M uses lean practices to engage workers - Plastics News | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Employees have contributed more than 4,000 lean ideas since they started the meetings four ​ years ago, and the company has implemented about 3,200.

"We're generating ideas every single day," Owen said. The result is that although the company's annual sales have been flat since the change in ownership, profitability has improved.
dumontis's insight:
Nice read. About 10 implemented ideas per employee per year
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How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees

How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Lean manufacturing at Toyota for instance was all about making average factory workers more productive by creating a culture that encouraged them to make suggestions for improvement.
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Lean History - Evolution of Lean Manufacturing

Auburn University Lean Manufacturing Lecture Segment Fall 2016
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Why Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) is Not Lean (Part 1) | Dumontis

Why Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) is Not Lean (Part 1) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning, or DDMRP in short, promises to be the first real innovation to MRP since the invention of MRP. Furthermore, in one of its white papers, the Demand Driven Institute states that “Lean Finds a Friend in DDMRP” (2011). DDMRP is positioned as integrating Lean, the Theory of Constraints (TOC) as well as Six Sigma whilst fundamentally innovating the traditional MRP (and DRP) planning approach. What I think of it? Some parts are OK, but most of it still has nothing to do with Lean. In a series of two posts (the second one of this series you can find here), I’ll try to explain my views and hope this may help you and your company in making the right decision when looking at your values, your thinking, your philosophy and your strategies.
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Lean’s Many Faces: Top-Down or Bottom-Up? | Dumontis

Lean’s Many Faces: Top-Down or Bottom-Up? | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Lean can present itself in many ways. To some, Lean appears as a grassroots initiative and as bottom-up improvement by everyone, everywhere, anytime. Others experience Lean more as a top-down initiative, driven by management and accompanied by standards, audits and specialists. Indeed, Lean can be seen as a many-faced phenomenon; almost as if Lean has a Multiple Personality Disorder.

So, what is Lean’s true face? How do we explain Lean’s different personalities to the workforce?
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Formulas for success in the fast lane - Independent.ie

Formulas for success in the fast lane - Independent.ie | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
"You can't run an F1 team by committee and consensus. They come down to being run by one person; they need to be very strong, talented and team-oriented.
dumontis's insight:
Interesting insight into how Toyota runs its Motorsports activities. The Kaizen spirit helps, but management by consensus is too slow.
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Productive Change: Peacefulness, Stress or Tension? | Dumontis

Productive Change: Peacefulness, Stress or Tension? | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Most of us are confronted with this question: how to create productive change? We all face the same difficulties in getting teams and organizations to another level of performance using sometimes fundamentally different principles. Developing and communicating an enticing vision surely helps, but a certain sense of urgency is always required. But here I notice that it is often difficult to strike the right balance. In some cases, plants and teams are confronted with sheer impossible objectives, resulting in continuously being in the “red area”. In other situations, I see that we don’t create a challenging enough environment for teams to become productive. Management “cushions” the team and each time they are confronted with difficulties, padding is added in the form of capacity, lead-time, surface, tolerances, safety stock and others just to make sure the team looks good and can continue to work in peace. So how to strike the right balance?
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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (5/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (5/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Using rigorous problem-solving logic, this blog post series tries to answer whether you should speak of multiple root causes or a single root condition (part 5 of 6, about the causal event chain at the system level, the necessary condition cause and the problem of non-adherence).

 
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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (3/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (3/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Using rigorous problem-solving logic, this blog post series tries to answer whether you should speak of multiple root causes or a single root condition (part 3 of 6 about tracing back the causal event chain).

 
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The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (1/6) | Dumontis

The Logic of Root Condition Analysis (1/6) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

Problem-solving and particularly the part that focuses on root cause analysis (RCA) has always been one of the topics that has had my special interest. I have coached many problem-solving teams, and besides the sometimes superficial use of problem-solving tools, there have always been two questions that have slumbered in my head, viz. (1) whether you could speak of one root cause, or that you should speak of multiple (root) causes; and (2) whether you should speak of the root cause or rather the root condition. Based upon the way my mentors have trained and coached me in problem-solving, as well as a lot of self-education and practice, I will try to explain how rigorous problem-solving logic (using an example) can help us answer these questions. At the same time, I hope the example and the logic will be of use in your problem-solving efforts or your coaching thereof.

 
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Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 2) | Dumontis

Are You on the Way to Perfect Flow? (Part 2) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

There are many approaches and methods that focus on improving flow. And for good reason, as improving flow yields improved profitability and returns. But how, in fact, can we determine our level of “flow”? In the first post, the typical ‘flow rate’ measure turned out to be unsuitable to do so. In this second post in a series of three, I therefore introduce flow velocity as a first measure to evaluate the level of and the progress towards flow.

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Shikumi: System-Based Lean Transformation | Dumontis

Shikumi: System-Based Lean Transformation | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
On the web, there is a palpable buzz of failed or unsuccessful Lean initiatives (or organizations that fail Lean if you prefer that point of view). No wonder, to be honest, as many of these initiatives can at best be characterized as programs. And more often they are even no more than a collection of disjointed projects.

Staff is trained, external consultants are brought in – often trained by another external consultant in another company going through a similar “program” – and off we are. We start identifying waste and we might even create a current state value stream map. Enough potential to fill an action list covering several pages, and so our Lean program is born.

What a joke! In doing so, a Lean initiative will never transcend the character of being only a program: a collection of projects and actions to eliminate problems. And calling these projects and actions “kaizens” really doesn’t make it more Lean. And this is only further emphasized by pursuing the apparently required “quick wins” to win over the company’s management. What is the alternative? A system-based Lean transformation, sometimes referred to as Shikumi.
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Le Futur dans les usines Renault | Groupe Renault

Robots collaboratifs, chaîne de production adaptable, hyper connectivité des objets, exosquelettes, contrôle qualité en temps réel, maintenance prédictive
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Applying Lean Manufacturing Principles to Building Maintenance | cre.tech

Applying Lean Manufacturing Principles to Building Maintenance | cre.tech | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
This is especially important given the fact that over-maintaining adds little or no value to the detection or prevention of asset failure. It is often assumed that the probability of failure reduces with increased preventive maintenance frequency. However, the relationship between preventive maintenance frequency and the probability of failure is not so tightly correlated.
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5 Whys: Getting to the Root of a Problem Quickly

5 Whys: Getting to the Root of a Problem Quickly | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
5 Whys is a powerful tool for finding the causes of simple or moderately difficult problems, by asking
dumontis's insight:
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Why Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) is Not Lean (Part 2) | Dumontis

Why Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) is Not Lean (Part 2) | Dumontis | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Demand-Driven Material Requirements Planning, or DDMRP in short, promises to be the first real innovation to MRP since the invention of MRP. Furthermore, in one of its white papers, the Demand Driven Institute states that “Lean Finds a Friend in DDMRP” (2011). DDMRP is positioned as integrating Lean, the Theory of Constraints (TOC) as well as Six Sigma whilst fundamentally innovating the traditional MRP (and DRP) planning approach. What I think of it? Some parts are OK, but most of it still has nothing to do with Lean. In a series of two posts of which this is the second (the first can be found here), I’ll try to explain my views and hope this may help you and your company in making the right decision when looking at your values, your thinking, your philosophy and your strategies.
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Tesla's real capacity problem: Too many people

Tesla's real capacity problem: Too many people | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
In its Fremont plant, a temple of lean manufacturing, Tesla uses far more workers than NUMMI did, to build far fewer cars.
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Stop Settling for Borderline Quality in Your Shop

Stop Settling for Borderline Quality in Your Shop | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it
Even when there are no actual part defects that create scrap or rework, addressing borderline quality is important to reducing waste in any machine shop.
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Three Japanese words are helping Maruti Suzuki find a balance between robots and humans

Three Japanese words are helping Maruti Suzuki find a balance between robots and humans | Lean | Dumontis | Scoop.it

"Kitanai (Dirty) Kiken (Dangerous) Kitsui (Difficult) The 3K's behind Maruti Suzuki's robots at their Manesar Plant."

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