Leading Schools
85.7K views | +2 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Engaged teachers engage students!

Engaged teachers engage students! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Brandon Busteed is executive director of education at Gallup


"there is nothing more important we can do as a country than to build the world’s most effective "educonomy," which would seamlessly integrate our educational system, our employers, and our job creators."

Mel Riddile's insight:
  • Teacher engagement is the most important driver of student engagement.
  • Student engagement in school drops precipitously from 5th grade through 12th grade.
  • About seven in 10 K-12 teachers are not engaged in their work (69%)
  • From parents to current college students to the general population, everyone agrees that the number one reason to go to college is “to get a good job.”
  • Yet, only 14% of Americans and 11% business leaders say that college graduates are well prepared for success at work.
  • Google announced that it found almost no correlation between the grades and test scores of its employees and their success on the job. So, the company has stopped asking for the information on employment applications.


Solutions

  1. offer paid and unpaid internships to high school and college students
  2. offer externships for teachers and faculty
  3. foster teacher and faculty engagement


more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 

 

In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.

 

In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.

 

Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?

 

Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.

 

Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson

 

• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).

 

Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)

 

• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


more...
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Reading Can Expand What Kids Think About Mathematics

Reading Can Expand What Kids Think About Mathematics | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
I love reading about math. Not dry textbooks, but texts that bring to life the people who do math as a profession. Or texts that introduce strange or unexpected ideas in ingenious ways and leave my heart pounding. Or texts that make me think about mathematics and mathematicians differently. In the past few years, I have started to use them with my students in small ways. I  didn’t want students to leave high school thinking mathematics is only what’s in their high school curriculum. It’s so much more. Math involves people… and big and tough ideas… and surprise and defeat and complex emotions. And different mathematical ideas exist in different times and places.

I’ve hosted regular formal book clubs with an entire class and also arranged informal book clubs with kids who were  interested in expanding their horizons. Occasionally, I’ll meet one-on-one with a student to do an independent study around a book, or simply  recommend a book for a student to read and then we can discuss.  There are so many interesting mathematical texts out there that teachers can use to draw in students. I’ve found all you have to do is “sell it” well. With that in mind, I’ll try to sell a handful of texts that  I’ve used with students or am hankering to try out. If you read anything about math and enjoy it,  take a moment to think if there’s a student or three (or even a whole class) who might enjoy reading and chatting about it. If so, bring iced tea and donuts to your book club, and forge a new type of relationship with some of your kids.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What if? Every student could successfully complete two college-level MATH courses?

What if? Every student could successfully complete two college-level MATH courses? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
What if your goal was to ensure that every student in your district successfully completed two college-level math courses prior to high school graduation?

This is exactly the kind of question that makes leaders in mathematics education cringe and makes other stakeholder roll their eyes. But, your attitude toward the question might be different if you consider the gains we have made in mathematics education over the past 25 years. Throughout my career as a member of Maryland’s mathematics education community, I have observed and participated in several distinct eras of mathematics reform. Each reform effort was purposeful in its design and offered, to the public, a “promise” that our graduates were ready for the world after high school.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Every Student Deserves a Personalized Learning Plan

Every Student Deserves a Personalized Learning Plan | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

All students can learn; however, not all students learn in the same way or at the same pace. Acknowledging this fact has driven the recent shift toward personalization in education.


In 2013, the state of Vermont committed itself to the value and promise that personalized learning holds for its students by passing Act 77, often referred to as the Flexible Pathways Initiative. The initiative requires every student in grades 7-12 to have a personalized learning plan—a document that guides each learner through a meaningful learning experience that leads to college and/or career readiness.


The concept of flexible pathways is what empowered Surdam to pursue her passion and enabled her to change course with ease. Vermont’s Agency of Education (AOE) defines flexible pathways as “any combination of high-quality academic and experiential components leading to secondary school completion and postsecondary readiness.” This doesn’t refer to a finite menu of pre-selected pathways from which a student must choose, but instead implies that there may be as many unique pathways as there are students, and that the possibilities are limited only by our imaginations and the resources available.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Kids Need to Read Within Instruction - Tim Shanahan 

Blast from Past: This blog entry first posted on January 4, 2016; and it was re-posted April 19, 2018. Recently, I got a lot of criticism on Twitter for arguing that school time should be used for teaching--rather than engaging kids in independent reading. Last week, I watched Doug Fisher argue for having kids reading on their own at home--rather than school (the kids whose teachers focus on independent reading instead of teaching reduce the school year by 14 days of teaching!). Despite the complaints of the critics, I'm a big supporter of having kids read at school--within instruction. This blog makes that case.

             If you have ever had surgery, you probably have had the weird experience of signing off on a bunch of medical paperwork. The oddest form is the one that gives the surgeon permission to assault you. Think about it. Usually we don’t want people poking at us with knives. Doctors can’t do that either, unless we give our permission. Otherwise, every tonsillectomy would lead to a 911 call.

           That means context matters. Stick a knife in someone in an OR and that is cool, do the same thing down at the local tap and you'll do 5-7 in the state pen.

           Over the years, I've challenged the notion of just having kids read on their own at school. (Or, maybe not so much challenged the notion as told people about the actual research findings on this topic which aren't so wonderful.) I’ve not been a friend to DEAR, SSR, SQUIRT, or similar schemes that set aside daily amounts of time for self selected reading in the classroom. 

             Most studies don’t find much pay off for this kind of reading—either in reading achievement or motivation to read. There are many better things to do if your goal is to encourage reading than to just tell kids to go read on their own (a directive that sounds a lot like, “go away and leave me alone").

            So, what's the topic of my first blog entry of 2016? You guessed it: the importance of having kids read at school.  That's the link to surgery. People shouldn’t stab you with a knife, except when they should. And, kids should not read at school--except when that is the smart thing to do.
Mel Riddile's insight:

“i have long argued for 2-3 hours per day of written language instruction, with that time divided among word work (both decoding and word meaning—words and parts of words), fluency, reading comprehension, and writing). If a teacher did that, it would mean that kids would work on reading comprehension for 2.5 hours to 3.75 hours per week (similar times would be devoted to the other components).


            But how much of that time should be spent on reading and writing? Not talking about reading, not being told how to write, not doing anything but practicing reading and writing. The correct answer is that nobody knows. So, let’s get arbitrary about it, and decide that during the 150 minutes of reading comprehension work we are doing this week, my boys and girls will spend 75 minutes of that time reading text!”


 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Angry and Fearful Parents Lash Out at School District Over Parkland Shooting - Blame lacking discipline

Angry and Fearful Parents Lash Out at School District Over Parkland Shooting - Blame lacking discipline | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
But a number of those who addressed school leaders did share a common concern: a district program designed to help troubled students has not lived up to its promise.

The diversionary program, called PROMISE, created by the district as part of a 2013 agreement with law enforcement agencies to clarify when to involve officers in student discipline came under fire along with the district's behavior intervention program, for students who return to district alternative school campuses after committing crimes.

While two former students stood to speak about the program's benefits, many parents and educators argued that PROMISE, and other district programs, have created a pipeline for troubled students to re-enter schools often without proper intervention from law enforcement or mental health services.

Broward County Superintendent Robert Runcie pushed back against criticism of the district's discipline plan, which has become a major focus of debate in Washington as the Trump administration weighs whether it will revise or revoke Obama-era rules on school discipline. That guidance—jointly issued by the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice—warned schools that they may violate federal civil rights laws if they enforce intentionally discriminatory rules or if their policies lead to disproportionately higher rates of discipline for students in one racial group, even if those policies were written without discriminatory intent.

Runcie told those in the audience that there was much misinformation circulating about the PROMISE program. Runcie plans to address questions about the program during a May 7 public forum.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Gates Foundation Eyes Middle Years Math Instruction

Gates Foundation Eyes Middle Years Math Instruction | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has signalled one of its new focus areas: improving "middle years" math for black, Latino, and low-income students and strengthening the teaching of the subject.

The foundation is inviting feedback on its new research and development plan, seeking information on programs, instructional models, and tools for improving teaching and learning in this area that seem promising. It's especially interested in what it calls "breakthrough" results, defined as making more than a year's progress toward grade-level expectations, high levels of proficiency on year-end tests, or demonstrating high levels of student engagement or motivation that show promise in deepening math learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Here's How the Public Views Teachers, Their Salaries, and Their Impact

Here's How the Public Views Teachers, Their Salaries, and Their Impact | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
• The 2017 poll of various K-12 issues by the journal Education Next found that members of the general public would categorize 25 percent of teachers at their local schools as "excellent" and 33 percent as "good." Another 28 percent of teachers were called "satisfactory" and just 15 percent were "unsatisfactory." Overall, parents who were surveyed put a larger share of teachers (30 percent) in the "excellent" category.

When provided information about public school teacher salaries, 36 percent of members of the general public then told Education Next that those salaries should increase. Meanwhile, 56 percent said they should stay about the same, while just 7 percent said they should decrease. However, a plurality (49 percent) of the general public opposed giving teachers tenure, Education Next reported.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

The Teaching Force Has Grown Faster Than Student Enrollment—Except in These 4 States

The Teaching Force Has Grown Faster Than Student Enrollment—Except in These 4 States | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Four states experienced larger growth in their student populations than in their teaching forces: Arizona, Indiana, Nevada, and Oklahoma. In Alabama, the student population didn't grow at all, but the number of teachers in the workforce decreased.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Leaders & Teachers: Let's Build an Agenda of Focus Together

Leaders & Teachers: Let's Build an Agenda of Focus Together | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
There is absolutely nothing worse as a teacher than having an initiative be thrust upon you with little transparency, support or time. Too often, administrators make important instructional decisions for teachers without their input and without their expertise. Sometimes despite their initiatives or ideas being good, they aren't successful because there is no time allotted for implementation or for really getting a pulse of what teachers think or feel.

As an educator, this happened TO ME often and early in my career, I did things like this to my students as well.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

TN Schools Halt Online Testing

TN Schools Halt Online Testing | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) - The Tennessee Department of Education says the data center powering TNReady testing in schools may have been the target of a deliberate attack. 

Some school systems across the state are halting online testing that was slated for Tuesday, as new issues with the system cropped up for the second day in a row.  

Local districts that have suspended testing include Williamson, Wilson, Robertson, Sumner and Dickson.

Metro schools tweeted this message: 

@TNedu is reporting problems with its online testing for the second day. Grades 3-8 testing will continue with paper tests. Those most impacted are high school students taking end of course exams and middle school students taking high school courses for credit. (1/2)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

To close achievement gap, parents learning key research on kids' brains

To close achievement gap, parents learning key research on kids' brains | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Cambridge Public Schools partnered with Harvard University researchers to create this program that helps parents understand their child’s brain development through a series of 10 weekly sessions for parents with children between 3 to 8 years old. School leaders say that knowledge can help low-income parents put their children on a more equal footing than children from better-off families.

“The goal is to help parents understand how the brain develops, to enable their child to be more prepared for school, critical thinking, as well as social and emotional situations,” said Marguerite Hicks-Gyewu, a facilitator for the sessions, said in an interview at the Cambridge Public School District’s office.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

When a Rubric Isn’t Enough

When a Rubric Isn’t Enough | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
THE NEED FOR SCAFFOLDING
My school partners with Mills Teacher Scholars, a professional learning organization that facilitates collaborative inquiry for educators. In working with Mills, I was focusing my inquiry project on finding the appropriate level of scaffolding: Too much scaffolding and students all write the same thing, too little and they engage in off-task behaviors or produce work that doesn’t make sense.

I wondered if my students’ uncertainty around my learning expectations prevented them from fully engaging in learning tasks. If they more clearly understood my expectations, would they more competently and confidently explain their ideas? How could I find the right balance in scaffolding my students’ learning?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

3 Tips to Support a Reflective Teaching Practice

3 Tips to Support a Reflective Teaching Practice | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
In my work as a school principal one of my biggest responsibilities was to observe and evaluate the quality of my teacher’s lessons as they worked with their students. In the post-observation conferences I held with staff, I worked hard to consistently bring my teachers to a place of feeling comfortable reflecting on their practice. In talking with my teachers and urging them to give me feedback I found most teachers to be sensitive and protective of their teaching when asked to reflect on a lesson. Some even became a bit defensive. Walking my teachers through the reflection process became one of the most challenging aspects of my work.
In a teaching practice, reflecting can take many forms. Make no mistake…it’s an integral part of our work as educators and should be done daily or at least weekly. Something we do into, through and beyond our work with students. So to answer your question, the value of reflection is unquestionably important. Here are three tips I want to share that you might want to start implementing to make reflecting on your teaching a daily habit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

“Being watched makes people (students) do better!

“Being watched makes people (students) do better! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

“A new study has just come out finding that people performed better on a video game when being watched, and they extrapolate for other activities “An audience can serve as an extra bit of incentive”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Veteran Teachers Understand: Almost no one looks at your lesson plans, and no one looks at your assessments!

Veteran Teachers Understand: Almost no one looks at your lesson plans, and no one looks at your assessments! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Nobody (or almost nobody) reads your lesson plans.


Exceptions: co-teachers, in-class support teachers, if you’re a brand new teacher, and the rare school in which an administrator will have a workload low enough (or a God complex serious enough) to make reading your lesson plans a regular priority.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How an elite coach teaches players "You must be prepared to fail to succeed."

How an elite coach teaches players "You must be prepared to fail to succeed." | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

“About a year ago the US Soccer Federation helped me identify four top performing youth soccer coaches around the country.  The idea was to study them in much the same way I’d studied elite teachers for Teach like a Champion and then to write profiles of them to make their ideas visible to other coaches. The first three profiles, of Chris Hayden, Tony Lepore and Ben Cross appeared in Soccer America over the course of the winter. 


The fourth profile is arguably the most important, particularly for for elite coaches.  It describes how Iain Munro Director of YSC Sports and the Youth Director for the Philadelphia Union creates what I call among teachers a ‘Culture of Error.’ That is, he makes it safe to be wrong.  Being afraid to be seen getting it wrong is a critical psychological challenge for our best players which can ironically slow down their learning process.  But making it safe to be wrong doesn’t necessarily mean going soft on rigor.  As I hope this profile will show, demanding and understanding are not necessarily opposites. 


Fear is the Enemy of Success”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

One big upside of career and tech programs? They push more kids to graduate

One big upside of career and tech programs? They push more kids to graduate | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
To find out, Dougherty studied Massachusetts’ 36 vocational and technical high schools, where students alternate between academic coursework and full-time work in areas like auto repair, graphic design, and machine technology. What he found was striking: At those schools, students were substantially more likely to graduate high school than similar peers at typical high schools.

Education news. In your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter
“The intention for CTE is to help with skill development for long-term career and earnings potential,” said Dougherty, an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut. “The fact that it’s having this payoff on high school graduation is a positive, but perhaps unintended, consequence.”

Career and technical programs can come with downsides, too — in particular, offering training in skills that may eventually become obsolete or devalued. But the new research bolsters the academic case for the programs, a rare education initiative that carries bipartisan imprimatur.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teachers Are at a Breaking Point. And It's Not Just About Pay

Teachers Are at a Breaking Point. And It's Not Just About Pay | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Many teachers enter the profession with a tacit (and sometimes explicit) agreement to accept a lower salary in exchange for better benefits, particularly affordable health care. The proportion of the salary-benefit split varies, but it is generally greater for educators than for other professionals. In analyzing Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the Economic Policy Institute also found that teachers—both public and private—received 11.2 percent of their compensation in the form of insurance benefits in 2015. For other comparable professionals, that number was 8.7 percent—not nearly a great enough difference to offset the growing compensation gap for teachers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

“Family structure is an overlooked factor in student success”

“Family structure is an overlooked factor in student success” | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
For two decades, as part of repeated research studies, thousands of participants from diverse backgrounds have watched the same video of college students playing basketball in a circle. Participants are told to count how many times the students wearing white shirts pass the basketball. Stunningly, roughly half of the participants become so distracted trying to count the passes that they completely miss something extraordinary: a student dressed in gorilla suit who walks into the middle of the scene and thumps her chest before walking out of the frame nine seconds later.
In the world of neuroscience, this phenomenon of being oblivious to the obvious is called “inattentional blindness.” This occurs any time we as human beings fail to notice a fully visible but unexpected object because our attention was on another task, event, or activity.
Inattentional blindness is an important concept to keep in mind now that the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress results for reading and mathematics for 4th and 8th grades have been released.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What Principals Really Think About Tech

What Principals Really Think About Tech | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A full 95 percent believe their students are using screens too much at home, and 83 percent say they're at least "moderately concerned" about how students use social media outside of school, according to a new national survey of school-based leaders conducted by the Education Week Research Center.
At the same time, however, principals are welcoming technology and technology-driven trends into their own buildings. More than half described personalized learning as either a "transformational way to improve public education" or a "promising idea." The relatively new idea of offering computer science education to every student is already on most principals' radar screens.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Samara Levy: Cold Call + No Opt Out + Retrieval Practice

Samara Levy: Cold Call + No Opt Out + Retrieval Practice | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Samara in the midst of her daily retrieval practice.  The purpose is to take what students know and drive it into long term memory by causing them to recall it consistently-and after a bit of forgetting.


To do this, Samara Peppers her students with questions on key facts via Cold Call.  No hands allowed. Everyone has to be ready. [You can raise your hand if you want to develop or improve an answer afterwards; Samara cues them with; “Who wants it?” which is nice & makes it feel a bit like a game show]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

9 ways you are demotivating and disempowering your team

9 ways you are demotivating and disempowering your team | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Shirking employee development

Part of that individual attention should be spent identifying opportunities for employee development. Helping your team grow the skills they need to move to the next level is a critical part of your job as their manager. If you’re strictly focused on maximizing the organization’s big-picture goals, you’re doing your team a disservice and delivering serious demotivation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

“social-emotional learning is best promoted through strong communities and relationships."

There is some value" to Pearson's approach, Starr said, but "social-emotional learning is best promoted through strong communities and relationships."

And Ben Williamson, a lecturer at the University of Stirling in the United Kingdom who studies big data in education, raised other concerns.  

There's little evidence that focusing on growth mindset in the classroom will significantly benefit students, Williamson argued, citing recent analyses finding limited effects of mindset-based interventions.

In addition, Williamson maintained, companies such as Pearson would be wise to pay close attention to the growing public anxiety over the ways companies collect people's sensitive information and use it for psychological profiling and targeting. It's especially troubling, he said, that the company did not seek informed consent from the young people who became subjects in their study.

"It's concerning that forms of low-level psychological experimentation to trigger certain behaviors appears to be happening in the ed-tech sector, and students might not know those experiments are taking place," Williamson said.

In an interview Monday at the AERA conference, Kristen DiCerbo, Pearson's vice president for learning research and design, described the experiment as part of the company's "product-improvement process"—an early test to see if new mindset-messaging features actually work, before they are rolled out comprehensively.

Using commercial software allowed Pearson to see how the changes played out for real students and actual classrooms, DiCerbo said, generating more useful information than had it taken place in a lab.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How to buy AV for the Classroom: 6 keys to consider

How to buy AV for the Classroom: 6 keys to consider | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Brightness. The Society for Information Display made color light output a new specification to consider in 2012, so look at both the white brightness and color light brightness specifications. An additional light-related consideration is the amount of ambient light in your classrooms.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

25-Year-Old Textbooks and Holes in the Ceiling: Inside America’s Public Schools

25-Year-Old Textbooks and Holes in the Ceiling: Inside America’s Public Schools | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Broken laptops, books held together with duct tape, an art teacher who makes watercolors by soaking old markers.

Teacher protests have spread rapidly from West Virginia to Oklahoma, Kentucky and Arizona in recent months. We invited America’s public school educators to show us the conditions that a decade of budget cuts has wrought in their schools.

We heard from 4,200 teachers. Here is a selection of the submissions, condensed and edited for clarity.
more...
No comment yet.