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The Myth of Learning Styles

The Myth of Learning Styles | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
For many years educators were under the false notion that there were learning styles, and recent research from Howard Gardner, John Hattie and Gregory Yates shows there isn't such thing as a learning style.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Years ago I too bought into the idea of Learning Styles, but I learned through years of professional practice that, while students had learning preferences, those often changed with context. In addition, implementing learning styles in a classroom was impractical and ineffective. So, what I ended up doing was using what is now referred to as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), which calls for multiple forms of input and output.


For the best explanation of the topic read Dan Willingham's "The Myth of Learning Styles" http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/September-October%202010/the-myth-of-learning-full.html

and "Why Learning Styles Don't Exist"

http://neurobollocks.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/why-learning-styles-dont-exist-by-daniel-willingham/


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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 24, 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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Should You Provide Students With Your PowerPoint Slides?

Should You Provide Students With Your PowerPoint Slides? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Should you provide pupils with your PowerPoint slides? Many educators spend time creating quality slides for their lessons. Why not share these with pupils?
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The case for shop class: How vocational schools and gap years can help ease academic anxiety

The case for shop class: How vocational schools and gap years can help ease academic anxiety | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
High school teachers and mental health experts say opening students' eyes to paths beyond elite colleges can have long-term benefits.

 


While some high school students are well-suited for a rigorous, science-and-math-heavy curriculum, other teens suffer from anxiety when they find themselves stumbling on the traditional, college preparatory path.


Experts say that while these teens are often as bright as their peers on the academic honor roll, their talents and learning styles are a better match for alternative educational pathways that can reduce stress in the short-term, and lead to rewarding and well-paying careers down the road.


 

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5 Principles of Outstanding Classroom Management

5 Principles of Outstanding Classroom Management | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
3. Set Rules, Boundaries, and Expectations (and Do It Early)
Students don’t thrive amid chaos. They need some basic structure—and consistency—to feel safe and to focus.

But maintaining a culture of mutual respect doesn’t mean your goal is to “make pals,” noted middle school reading coach Heather Henderson. “You can’t be their friend. You can be kind, loving, and supportive, but you still have to be their teacher.” Establish the code of conduct early in the year, and be sure that everyone—including the teacher—makes an effort to stay true to it. Predictability counts: “Follow through with rewards and consequences. If you say it, mean it. And if you mean it, say it. Be clear, be proactive, and be consistent,” said Lori Sheffield.

There was broad consensus among educators that modeling appropriate classroom behavior sets the tone for children: “You make the weather,” said Diana Fliginger from Minot, North Dakota. “Your attitude as the teacher really determines what the tone and environment of your classroom is like. If you want calm and productive, project that to your kids.” Many others cautioned that while enforcing rules consistently is critical, it’s important to pick your battles too—especially if those confrontations are going to be public: “Instead, say, ‘You and I will talk about this later,’” advises Denise Tremblay Drapeau. “That way you can still address the issue while saving face. It completely changed the vibe in my classroom.”
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allowing any computer usage in the classroom “reduces students’ average final-exam performance by roughly one-fifth of a standard deviation.

Is technology good or bad for education? New research out of MIT helps answer the question. Spoiler alert: It depends, but at least it's predictable.
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Even When States Revise Standards, the Core of the Common Core Remains

For a while, the Common Core State Standards seemed to teeter on the brink of the abyss. State lawmakers were defecting left and right, convening committees to rewrite the standards.
But a review released on Monday of 24 states’ revisions show that they have largely preserved the common core’s most important features.
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Small 'Nudges' Can Push Students in the Right Direction

Small 'Nudges' Can Push Students in the Right Direction | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
"Nudges" are low-cost interventions meant to influence behavior by changing how or when choices are offered. Research is showing that when used with students, nudges can get positive results.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Stanford University motivation researcher Carol Dweck said nudge interventions show promise in helping students and the adults around them develop a strong academic growth mindset, the belief that academic skills are not fixed but can be improved through effort. "We’ve discovered over time there are so many triggers in the environment that put any of us into more of a fixed mindset," Dweck said. "Change is about recognizing when that happens and knowing how to trigger an environment that encourages a growth mindset."

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Does Inclusion Slow Down General Education Classrooms?

Does Inclusion Slow Down General Education Classrooms? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A researcher finds teachers in classrooms with high numbers of students with disabilities spend less time on teaching, but the analysis also offers a more complex view of teacher behavior.
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Better tests don't lead to better teaching!

Better tests don't lead to better teaching! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

How can we improve classroom instruction in the midst of high-stakes testing? One of the conclusions from this study is that you can’t expect the test itself to be the sole driver of change,” said David Blazar, a co-author of the study and a professor at the University of Maryland’s College of Education. “Some people think if you get rid of the test, then instruction improves. But the findings of this paper would lead you to be skeptical of that. Others say we could change what is tested and improve instruction. The findings here suggest that tests on their own are unlikely to improve instruction or to change what happens in the classroom.”

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Americans who haven't gone to college are way worse off today than 40 years ago

Americans who haven't gone to college are way worse off today than 40 years ago | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Several decades ago, regular American guys could get by with a decent job with a decent wage on just a high school diploma. But things are...


 


American men who have only a high school diploma have seen a reversal of fortunes over the last few decades.
While real wages have increased over the last several decades for those who have a higher level of education, they have held flat or fallen for those with lower levels of education.

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Research every teacher should know: setting expectations

Research every teacher should know: setting expectations | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

What are the main findings?
The students who had been chosen at random were more likely to make larger gains in their academic performance over the course of the year. The researchers attributed this to their teachers having high expectations of these students, subsequently altering their behaviour.
This expectancy advantage was most pronounced in younger students, with those aged seven to eight gaining an average of 10 verbal IQ points compared with their peers in the control group.
Students’ previous performance and ability did not effect how much benefit they got from high expectations. Both low- and high-ability students benefited accordingly.
The most significant benefit for male students came with an increase in verbal IQ, with girls mainly benefiting from an increase in reasoning IQ.

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Delegate, Don’t Abdicate! The 5 Levels of Delegation

Delegate, Don’t Abdicate! The 5 Levels of Delegation | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Rather than thinking of delegation as a binary issue--either you delegate or you don't--consider what it might look like on a sliding scale

 


In a prior article, I talked about the power of using the 70% rule when it comes to delegating tasks to your employees. I also discussed how you need to assess the critical nature of an issue - whether it's below the waterline or not - when it comes to delegating.


But there's actually another framework that we've had great success with in terms of helping leaders and their direct reports get on the same page when it comes to how issues get delegated on a daily basis.


Rather than thinking of delegation as a binary issue-;either you delegate or you don't-;consider what it might look like on a sliding scale where a leader might delegate more responsibility over time as he or she begins to trust the level of competency of their direct report.


We can actually break this down into five different stages of delegation: Level 1-5.


Actually, there's a sixth stage level 0 where there is no delegation. This is when a business is run by the "do what I say" rule where there is no authority or decision-making beyond the leader. If you're reading this, we'll assume you want to move past this stage.


At Level 1, delegation involves asking a subordinate to take the initial look into

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Mubashir Hussain's curator insight, November 9, 5:31 AM

Kool Design Maker is professional graphics and banner ad design company in the USA.

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Retrieval Practice: A Teachers' Definition and Video Examples

Retrieval Practice: A Teachers' Definition and Video Examples | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
We’ve been reading up a lot on retrieval practice lately.  Hopefully we’re not alone in that. From a cognitive science standpoint it’s absolutely central to improving learning.

You might recall  Daniel Willingham’s assertion about the importance of knowledge:

Data from the last thirty years lead to a conclusion that is not scientifically challengeable: thinking well requires knowing facts, and that’s true not simply because you need something to think about. The very processes that teachers care about most — critical thinking processes such as reasoning and problem solving — are intimately intertwined with factual knowledge that is in long-term memory (not just found in the environment).

There are two parts of Willingham’s assertion:

1) You can only think deeply and critically about what you know well—what you have a lot of knowledge about—and

2)  To aid thinking, that knowledge must be encoded in long-term memory. Retrieval practice is the tool that encodes knowledge in long term memory.
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Does High School Start Too Early?

Does High School Start Too Early? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Sleep expert Wendy Troxel says teens are sleep-deprived because of early school start times that cater to adults. She says high schools should start classes at least an hour later.
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Celebrating principals and their powerful leadership practices

As we celebrate principals this month, I ask you to remember one of those building leaders who influenced your professional or personal life. Perhaps it was a principal from your childhood you've come to appreciate even more as you better understand the complexities of their job. Or maybe you recall a principal from a point in your career, someone who enabled you to be an effective teacher or encouraged you to embrace your own leadership aspirations. It might even be your own child's current principal who has helped surround your daughter or son with all the supports needed to thrive. Whomever it is, I encourage you to find a way to let that school leader know how much you appreciate their efforts. Believe me, your principal will be so thankful you noticed and took the time to let her or him know.

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Can You Be a Great Principal Without Technical Expertise?

Leadership is not a transferable skill.

 


There is a broad assumption in society and in education that the skills you need to be a leader are more or less transferable. If you can inspire and motivate people in one arena, you should be able to apply those skills to do the same in another venue.


But recent research is rightly challenging this notion. Studies suggest that the best leaders know a lot about the domain in which they are leading, and part of what makes them successful in a management role is technical competence. For example, hospitals managed by doctors perform better than those managed by people with other backgrounds. And there are many examples of people who ran one company effectively and had trouble transferring their skills to the new organization.

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Boys Read Better When There Are More Girls in Class

Boys Read Better When There Are More Girls in Class | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Having more girl classmates may help boys and girls alike boost their reading skills, according to a new study in the Journal of School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

Using data from the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment, a benchmarking test of 15-year-olds in 33 countries, the researchers looked at how school resources and social characteristics affected boys' and girls' reading performance. In each school, the researchers analyzed the concentration of poverty, the percentage of teachers with a college degree, and the proportion of girls to boys. 

On average across countries, students had higher reading scores in low-poverty schools and schools where a majority of teachers had a college degree. But researchers also found girls scored nearly 30 points higher than boys on a 600-point scale, and all students scored better when girls made up at least 60 percent of students in the school:
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Americans who give their schools an A grade is its highest in more than 40 years

Americans who give their schools an A grade is its highest in more than 40 years | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Americans overwhelmingly support investments in career preparation but give a thumbs-down to vouchers and standardized testing.
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67% of well-formulated plans failed due to poor implementation

67% of well-formulated plans failed due to poor implementation | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Experts have opined for decades on the reasons behind the spectacular failure rates of strategy execution. In 2016, it was estimated that 67% of well-formulated strategies failed due to poor execution. There are many explanations for this abysmal failure rate, but a 10-year longitudinal study on executive leadership conducted by my firm showed one clear reason. A full 61% of executives told us they were not prepared for the strategic challenges they faced upon being appointed to senior leadership roles. It’s no surprise, then, that 50%–60% of executives fail

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 13, 4:34 PM

This could not be more true! It pertains to teaching plans and systems as well.

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Is Testing the Only Way a Student Can Achieve Success Under ESSA?

Is Testing the Only Way a Student Can Achieve Success Under ESSA? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Every Student Succeeds Act kept in place the testing regimen from the law it replaced, the No Child Left Behind Act. But states must bring in other factors, too.

 


Test scores are not the only measure of student success under the Every Student Succeeds Act, according to this analysis. The law mandates that states select a factor other than testing for measuring success. Over 30 states have selected attendance or chronic absenteeism.

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3 Assumptions Teachers Should Avoid

3 Assumptions Teachers Should Avoid | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Some assumptions can negatively impact your teaching practice. We have a few tips to combat three common ones.

 



  • Three Assumptions That Can Lead to Frustration
    1. I should know this. No matter how well the lesson is planned, no matter how many times you’ve taught it already, the class in front of you is a new group. Their needs are different from those of the last class. So every year involves some relearning how to teach them. Their culture changes, their lives and families change, and you change, too. Demographics change, standards change.

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Why Are Parents Afraid of Later School Start Times?

Why Are Parents Afraid of Later School Start Times? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new paper argues that using behavioral economics to ease families’ fear of change could help convince them to switch up their children’s routines.

 


Research has shown that early school start times (7:30 a.m., for example) don’t square with adolescents’ sleep needs, and that later ones have positive effects on mental and physical health, as well as academic performance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have even urged policymakers to move toward later start times—scientists tend to recommend pushing the bell to 8:30 a.m.—for middle and high-school students. Still, many school districts have been mired in years-long debates over the issue.

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I Do, We Do, You Do: Modeling and Gradual Release of Responsibility

I Do, We Do, You Do: Modeling and Gradual Release of Responsibility | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Learn about the I Do, We Do, You Do modeling strategy. This strategy works in any learning environment. Video demonstrates its use in a special ed ELL classroom.

 


 

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The Case(s) Against Personalized Learning

The Case(s) Against Personalized Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Leading researchers say their work does not support the most enthusiastic claims being made by personalized-learning supporters. Education experts are raising questions about implications for teaching and learning. Tech-industry critics are sounding alarms about Silicon Valley's growing influence over public schools. And a small but vocal coalition of parents and activists from across the political spectrum deride the term "personalized learning" as an Orwellian misnomer for replacing teachers with digital devices and data-mining software.
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Principals Like Social-Emotional Learning. Here's Why Schools Struggle With It

Principals Like Social-Emotional Learning. Here's Why Schools Struggle With It | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
School leaders see students' social and emotional development as important factors in school success but, in a nationally representative survey of principals, just 35 percent of respondents said their school was fully implementing a plan for incorporating social-emotional learning into policies and classroom work.

Principals reported several barriers to putting social-emotional learning strategies into place, including a lack of time, inadequate teacher training, and a need for further evidence of its link to academic success.

The findings of the survey—administered to 884 public school principals by Civic Enterprises and Hart Associates on behalf of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning—mirror anecdotal reports from school leaders and teachers around the country in recent years.
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What Educational Fads Are Teachers Having To Endure?

What Educational Fads Are Teachers Having To Endure? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Over the past 20 years, what do you think teachers have wasted their time doing most? It may be an oldie, but by far the most popular blog on the site this week has been 20 Years of Educational Fads. Take a look at the images below - how many have affected your teaching in some way over your career? Have they positively impacted your practice? Or are they just fads?

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