Leading Schools
84.4K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

As popularity rises, so does risk of being bullied

Adolescence can be painful for the stereotypical victims of school bullying -- students who are targeted because of their appearance, sexual orientation or loner status. But not all bullying victims fit that profile.
more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


more...
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teacher-Evaluation Efforts Haven't Shown Results

Teacher-Evaluation Efforts Haven't Shown Results | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Gates Foundation is redirecting its financial backing away from teacher evaluation overhaul efforts to more "locally-driven solutions."

 


”Bill and Melinda Gates have poured their fortune into, among other things, the push for common standards, small schools, and efforts to overhaul teacher evaluations. Reflecting on these funding initiatives in a recent interview with the Associated Press, the billionaire husband and wife team admit they haven't worked.


"It's in taking all of those lessons and saying, 'OK, but did they reach the majority of the school districts? Did they scale and change the system for low-income and minority kids writ large, at scale?' And the answer when we looked at it, it was no," Melinda Gates told the AP.


The two have acknowledged missteps before, most recently with the Common Core State Standards. As Liana Heitin (now Loewus) reported in May of 2016, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation acknowledged having underestimated the amount of resources and support public schools would need to incorporate the standards.


But the admission that the push for tougher teacher evaluations—including tying student test scores to teacher performance—has fallen flat is notable considering the contentiousness of the debate over how to judge teacher quality, and how influential the Gates Foundation has been in shaping that realm over the last decade.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

The National Writing Project Offers Wonderful Online Writing Opportunity To Students

The National Writing Project Offers Wonderful Online Writing Opportunity To Students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
  The extraordinary National Writing Project has done it again and is offering a too-good-to-pass-up online writing opportunity to students. Here’s an excerpt from their site, WRITING OU…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Research every teacher should know about self-control and learning

In his series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: research looking at self-control
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Boosting longer-term outcomes for students demands more systemic—and sustainable—change

Boosting longer-term outcomes for students demands more systemic—and sustainable—change | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
What is continuous improvement and why are schools and districts jumping on that bandwagon?

 


”It’s one thing to boost test scores in individual schools from year to year. But as districts work to improve under the Every Student Succeeds Act, many are finding that boosting longer-term outcomes for students demands more systemic—and sustainable—change.
That’s the frustration driving the growing popularity of “continuous school improvement,” an umbrella term for frallmeworks and tools used to analyze and solve problems of policy and practice over time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

ACT/SAT for all: A cheap, effective way to narrow income gaps in college

ACT/SAT for all: A cheap, effective way to narrow income gaps in college | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Susan Dynarski presents evidence in support of states adopting a policy of requiring that all high school students take the ACT or SAT. Her evidence presents strong support for schools to administer mandatory college entrance exams free of charge during the school week.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

School Counselors Responsible for 482 Students on Average, Report Finds - High School & Beyond - Education Week

School Counselors Responsible for 482 Students on Average, Report Finds - High School & Beyond - Education Week | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new report shows that school counselors are still carrying big caseloads, even as they're being asked to advise students on a widening range of issues.

 


The heavy caseloads of school counselors haven't gotten much lighter in the past decade, even as schools are under pressure to deliver quality advice and guidance on a growing range of issues.


A report issued Thursday by two groups that represent school counselors shows that the national average student-counselor ratio was 482 to 1 in 2014-15, the most recent year for which data are available. In 2004-05, the average ratio was 479 to 1.


The National Association for College Admission Counseling and the American School Counselor Association conducted the study, drawing from information that states submit to the National Center for Education Statistics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Using Formative Assessment Systematically Significantly Improves Learning

Using Formative Assessment Systematically Significantly Improves Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

In the classroom, "using formative and summative assessments in a systematic manner provides valuable information to students and significantly improves learning and achievement; setting objectives and providing regular feedback (including praise) on student progress toward achieving those objectives helps to keep students motivated and on track" (Pages 6-7). My principal, who I will call "Jim" throughout this paper, is working on improving school-wide assessment practices by the implementation of Overarching Learning Goals, gradeless practices, google classroom etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Classroom design should follow evidence, not architectural fads

Classroom design should follow evidence, not architectural fads | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Despite a boom in the construction of trendy buildings and classrooms, the evidence for their link to boosting learning outcomes is limited.

 


The past decade has seen a boom in the construction of trendy buildings with visually appealing interiors in schools and universities. Proponents highlight the potential of these flexible and technology-rich spaces, referred to as innovative learning environments (ILEs), to shape behaviours to enhance student learning.


Economic and technological changes have caused a reconsideration of the nature of teaching and learning. This narrative has been used to underpin the call to re-imagine school learning environments.


Critiques highlight the constrained, static design of conventional classrooms, which favours more traditional teaching practices. It is suggested this is not conducive to those learning experiences favoured in current policy.


However, this claimed relationship between space and teacher practice is flimsy. There is a lack of evidence to underpin it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Time for Math Teachers to Display Their Passion for Mathematics!

When the Common Core State Standards came out almost ten years ago, the Standards for Mathematical Practice were created. The practices “rest on important processes and proficiencies with longstanding importance in mathematics education.” There are core principles such as perseverance, reasoning, and modeling that I think are critical to develop with students. In rereading the document recently, I noticed the absence of some important words: joy, love, and passion, to name a few. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are the “expertise” that should be developed with students. Noted.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

A Fourth Step: “I Do, We Do, You Do” and then “You Teach”

As regular readers know, I’m a big fan of creating the conditions where students can teach their classmates (see The Best Posts On Helping Students Teach Their Classmates — Help Me Find More and my ASCD Ed Leadership article, Student Engagement: Key to Personalized Learning).
This year, with the help of my exceptional student teacher, Amber Kantner, and the support of my talented colleague, Pam Buric, we’re able to move this idea to an entirely different level.
Many teachers are familiar with the “Gradual Release of Responsibility Model” – I do, we do, you do.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Online Courses Are Harming the Students Who Need the Most Help

Online Courses Are Harming the Students Who Need the Most Help | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Online education helps school districts that need to save money make do with fewer teachers. But there is mounting evidence that struggling students suffer.

 


”A single teacher can reach thousands of students in an online course, opening up a world of knowledge to anyone with an internet connection. This limitless reach also offers substantial benefits for school districts that need to save money, by reducing the number of teachers.


But in high schools and colleges, there is mounting evidence that the growth of online education is hurting a critical group: the less proficient students who are precisely those most in need of skilled classroom teachers.


Online courses can be broken down into several categories, and some are more effective than others.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What's Hot in Literacy

What's Hot in Literacy | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The What's Hot in Literacy survey from the International Literacy Association (ILA) reports what educators say is hot, not, and should be and what's important, not, and should be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Principals : What is the Biggest Barrier to Achieving Instructional Leadership?

Principals : What is the Biggest Barrier to Achieving Instructional Leadership? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Barriers to Leading Effectively
For the past four years I have had the opportunity to work with a lot of leaders in North America and abroad. In leadership sessions, we typically start the first session by talking about barriers to success. When it came to sessions where I only worked with assistant principals, I was a bit surprised by the barrier the assistants mentioned. It wasn't teachers or parents.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Writing essays by formula

Writing essays by formula | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Schools and colleges in the United States are adept at teaching students how to write by the numbers. The idea is to make writing easy by eliminating the messy part – making meaning – by focusing effort on reproducing a formal structure. As a result, the act of writing turns from moulding a lump of clay into a unique form to filling a set of jars that are already fired. Not only are the jars unyielding to the touch, but even their number and order are fixed. There are five of them, which, according to the recipe, need to be filled in precise order. Don’t stir. Repeat.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teachers Observing Their Peers: Compliance is not Engagement

Teachers Observing Their Peers: Compliance is not Engagement | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Peer observations are a great way for teachers to reflect on their instructional practices as well as build a culture of collaboration among staff members. Here are a few guidelines to consider before embarking on classroom observations.
Have a clear lens of focus before entering the classroom. Before entering classrooms have a specific area you are looking to observe. Whether it’s student engagement, classroom setup, or opening or closing procedures, have an idea of what you are looking for beforehand so that you can focus and not grow distracted by all the moving parts in a classroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

A New Idea to Promote Transfer...of Learning

“It's one of the most familiar (and frustrating) problems teachers encounter. Students learn something new (say, a standard solution technique for a standard mathematical problem) but then fail to recognize the problem type when they encounter it again. For example, students may learn the idea of a "common factor" in equation form in an algebra class and fail to see that the same idea can be applied in a word problem.


This is usually called the problem of transfer, and a classic laboratory problem was devised by Mary Gick & Keith Holyoak.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Only 1/3 of the nation's school children read at grade level!

Only 1/3 of the nation's school children read at grade level! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Two thirds of the nation's school children struggle with reading. Neuroscientist Mark Seidenberg says teachers need a better understanding of what science knows about how kids learn to read.

 


only a third of the nation's school children read at grade level. The reasons are numerous, but one that Seidenberg cites over and over again is this: The way kids are taught to read in school is disconnected from the latest research, namely how language and speech actually develop in a child's brain.


Seidenberg is a cognitive scientist and professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In his latest book, Language at the Speed of Sight, he points out that the "science of reading" can be a difficult concept for educators to grasp. He says it requires some basic understanding of brain research and the "mechanics" of reading, or what is often referred to as phonics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience Says This Kind of Lighting Can Reduce Brainpower By 30 Percent

Neuroscience Says This Kind of Lighting Can Reduce Brainpower By 30 Percent | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Dim lights are producing dimwits, says the study's author.

a new laboratory study out of Michigan State University suggests that working in dim lighting can "change the brain's structure and hurt one's ability to remember and learn," according to a university press release.


The study tracked the brains of Nile grass rats in a lab experiment. Half the animals were kept in an environment where the lights were dim, simulating what humans might encounter in typical indoor lighting like an office, or outside on a cloudy midwinter day.


The other half were kept in an environment with much brighter lighting--think of a sunny day outside.


Results: The animals that were kept in dimmer light "lost about 30 percent of capacity in the hippocampus, a critical brain region for learning and memory, and performed poorly on a spatial task they had trained on previously."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Self-Control and Learning

In his series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: research looking at self-control
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Finding Your Preferred Leadership Style Will Make You a Better Leader. Here's How

Finding Your Preferred Leadership Style Will Make You a Better Leader. Here's How | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Which leadership style does your team need from you?

 


”See, peak performance leaders give up the right to play to their strength. They have discovered, usually painfully, the truth about leadership styles. They know that leadership styles cross a spectrum bounded on one side by "collaborative leadership" and on the other by "command and control leadership." They know that there styles in the middle of the extremes that blend to two at different levels.


More than knowing that the spectrum exists, peak performance leaders know that to lead anything, they have to be committed to mastering the leadership styles across the spectrum. Perhaps they are more comfortable with one style than the others, but they also know that any strength taken to an extreme becomes a weakness.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

“Under-Used Teaching & Learning Strategies”

“Under-Used Teaching & Learning Strategies” | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Under-Used Teaching & Learning Strategies is the headline of my latest Education Week Teacher column.
In it, Kathy Glass, Amber Chandler, Carol Salva, Jennifer Davis Bowman and Janet Allen propose their “nominees” for under-used – and effective – instructional strategies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Why all children must learn their times tables — and fun ways to teach them

Why all children must learn their times tables — and fun ways to teach them | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Parents can teach very young children to "skip count" at the kitchen table, and it will set them up to be successful math learners throughout their secondary and post-secondary education.

 


”The mathematicians and education researchers who have helped classroom teachers to implement this straightforward computational procedure are eager to emphasize that their enthusiasm is due, in part, to their “eyes on the future” — focused on secondary and post-secondary mathematics.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Suspension Bans Hurt Kids

The numbers show that banning suspensions does real academic damage.

 


”The ban has done substantial academic damage. If the board is actually willing to do what it asks of students, to learn, it will repeal the ban.


A first-of-its-kind study by a Boston University doctoral candidate demonstrates direct, causal harm from the ban – harm that's the greatest in schools that had to lower suspensions by the most. Until recently, academic studies basically said: "Schools with more suspensions are weaker academically than schools with fewer suspensions." From there, activists have assumed that lowering suspensions must therefore increase academic achievement.


This study gives the lie to that wishful logic. It compares academic growth in Los Angeles Unified School District middle schools before and after the ban. In schools that didn't have any suspensions for willful defiance before, academic growth improved slightly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Five Hurdles That Keep School Systems From Improving

Five Hurdles That Keep School Systems From Improving | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Chronically low-performing states must work to overcome structural disadvantages and longstanding challenges that many of them share.

 


”Among states that received the lowest grades in the latest Quality Counts report, the Education Week Research Center identified several common challenges. These include relatively high rates of children and parents living in poverty, limited opportunities for early learning, and struggles with producing strong academic outcomes. These states also have (and provide) limited resources and funding to their K-12 systems.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Designing Math Classrooms Where Students Want to Join In'

Designing Math Classrooms Where Students Want to Join In' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
We have so much mythology about who is smart in math. Especially in secondary classrooms, students enter with really strong preconceived ideas about whether or not they will even be able to learn, which, in turn, shapes their motivation and engagement. These ideas come from their prior experiences in math class, but also from cultural and family mythologies about who is (and isn't) a "math person." This draws on all kinds of racial, linguistic, and gendered stereotypes, of course, but it goes beyond that into all kinds of students saying things like, "I just don't have a math brain." Unfortunately, the ubiquity of standardized test scores, which always include math testing, provide even more fodder for these notions.
more...
No comment yet.