Leading Schools
83.4K views | +20 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

The Things That Linger After They've Forgotten Everything You Taught

The Things That Linger After They've Forgotten Everything You Taught | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Things That Linger After They've Forgotten Everything You Taught

1. How You Make Students Feel

2. The Discoveries They Make About Themselves

3. The Networks, Communities, Habits, & Tools You Help Them Discover & Use

4. Learning Strategies

5. Reading Habits

more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


more...
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Smart Leaders Focus on Execution First and Strategy Second

Smart Leaders Focus on Execution First and Strategy Second | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Four things to focus on.

 


We found the perfect strategy” ranks with “And they lived happily ever after” as a perpetual myth. A strategy is never excellent in and of itself; it is shaped, enhanced, or limited by implementation. Top leaders can provide the framework and tools for a team, but the game is won on the playing field. When a strategy looks brilliant, it’s because of the quality of execution. A dumb idea is the one you fumble in the field by missing critical details, like how customers would react or what competitors might change while you’re still picking up the ball.


In decades of teaching executives at Harvard Business School and interviewing CEOs for my research, I’ve observed that savvy leaders whose strategies succeed tend to focus on four implementation imperatives:


Question everything. When Apple launched the iPhone in 2007 with AT&T as exclusive service provider, telecom giant Verizon decided to launch its own smartphone. It knew it had to act fast, so top leaders began by challenging major assumptions about how they operated. Instead of do-it-ourselves, they worked with Google and Motorola. Instead of we-know-better, they used their partners’ capabilities and shared data. Instead of waiting for every step to be finished before proceeding to the next, they worked on many fronts simultaneously. They created an excellent product in record time, in time for launch in the 2009 holiday season. In the two months post-launch, Droid sales even outpaced the iPhone’s launch numbers. Verizon would not have been able to so quickly and successfully change its strategy without being willing to question and overhaul traditional organizational structures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Ten Creative Alternatives to Showing Movies Before the Break

Ten Creative Alternatives to Showing Movies Before the Break | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
December is exhausting for teachers. The days are shorter. The weather grows colder and (at least here in Oregon) wetter. Students are anxious — whether it’s a buzzing excitement for vacation or a sense of dread that some kids feel in homes that are unsafe during the holidays.

And teachers are tired. They’re tired of redirecting behaviors and tired of the mid-year pressure of the test and simply tired of the sheer energy it takes to be a teacher.

It’s no wonder that so many teachers begin playing holiday movies around this time of year. They want to create a sense of fun and escape and enjoyment, and a motion picture promises exactly that. Maybe that’s okay. Maybe that’s a part of creating a culture of joy. So, please don’t read this post as a slam on teachers showing movies before the break. If this is a part of a positive classroom culture, keep doing it. This isn’t meant to be a guilt trip or a rant or a “you’re doing this wrong” post. This is meant to be a yes/and post offering other options.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Does your state overstate its children’s readiness for college and postsecondary education?

The education nonprofit Achieve calls this the “honesty gap,” although some educators and politicians prefer to use the term “proficiency gap” (the former implies intentional deception, Hofmeister argues). Regardless of nomenclature, the fact remains: Oklahoma is just one of many states nationwide that has previously overstated its children’s readiness for college.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What's the Problem With Word Problems?

What's the Problem With Word Problems? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Problem-solving is not only one of the most important components of the study of mathematics; it permeates all aspects of life, including the professional world. Problem-solving teaches students to be critical out-of-the-box thinkers, hone organizational skills, and build a rational thought process required for making logical decisions. Students who are problem-solvers will someday pursue technical careers and become the researchers, inventors, designers, and engineers of the future.
There's only one problem with problem-solving: When we look at the math section of a standardized test like the PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers), particularly at the middle school level—where proficiency rates of students in grades 6-8 who met or exceed expectations in math fell under 35 percent in 2015-16—we can see that it is the word-problem portion that often trips students up.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

In Discipline Debate, Two Groups Draw Different Conclusions About the Same District

In Discipline Debate, Two Groups Draw Different Conclusions About the Same District | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Questions about student discipline and, more specifically, the role of suspensions in schools, have been the subject of renewed debate recently.


When are suspensions appropriate? What's an appropriate replacement for classroom removal? What's the right way to rework a discipline policy? Who should make these decisions?


Two groups can even look at the same school district and draw different conclusions.


Thomas Fordham Institute released a report Tuesday examining discipline data in Philadelphia Public Schools before and after the district changed its policies to restrict the use of suspensions for more minor offenses. It found that many schools did not fully comply with the change, and that while previously suspended students saw improved attendance after the change, their test scores did not significantly improve.


The Fordham Institute's conclusion? That "top-down decrees" are "impractical and potentially harmful." Representatives from that organization have notably spoken against Obama-era guidance on school discipline, which called on schools to consider alternatives to suspensions.


But the authors of another report on discipline in Philadelphia schools say it's possible for the district to see improvements in its discipline but that "efforts to shape schools' climates and approaches to discipline can only succeed to the extent that they accommodate and adapt to the assets and challenges of particular contexts."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Why Strategy Without Execution Will Get You Nowhere

Why Strategy Without Execution Will Get You Nowhere | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Executing a strategy without engaged people is impossible, and brilliant strategies without execution are meaningless.

 


I’ve long believed that the purpose of strategic planning is not to create plans, but to change how we think and act. It’s not the plan, but the action, that matters. Strategy is not brilliant in and of itself; its value is determined by how well people execute it.


In many cases, execution refines and even revises the best-laid strategic intentions. So, the essence of success is people - people who understand the stated direction and who start to implement their own innovative ideas, experiments, and behaviors to iterate on the original strategy, so that it becomes something even more refined, succinct, dynamic, workable, and valuable.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Using video for self reflection: Micro-Teaching Improves Learning

Using video for self reflection: Micro-Teaching Improves Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Video lets us see what actually happens in our classroom—what we say, what we do and how we interact with the students. It's genuine. It shows our strengths and our weaknesses. Maybe we did not see that student put their pencil down and give up; maybe we call on another student too much; or maybe there needs to be more student to student interaction. In the middle of a lesson, this may be difficult to see because we are preoccupied with delivering the information dictated to us by the standards. However, allowing ourselves the opportunity to look at it again and reflect using a different lens is transformational.
Make the right changes. After we reflect, we consider translating or moving some things around in our lesson. In an inductive lesson, could we have sequenced the sharing of their work, could we make better connections between student understandings or could we have noticed a place in our lesson where we could build on what the students already know? Being able to watch ourselves lets us see where we can improve delivery.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

U.S. high school graduation rates rise to new high

U.S. high school graduation rates rise to new high | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The nation’s graduation rate rose again to a record high, with more than 84 percent of students graduating on time in 2016, according to data released Monday by the U.S. Department of Education.

That is the highest graduation rate recorded since 2011, when the Education Department began requiring schools to report rates in a standardized way. The graduation rate rose by nearly a percentage point from 2015 to 2016, from 83.2 percent to 84.1 percent. It has risen about 4 percentage points since 2011, when 79 percent of students obtained a high school diploma within four years.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Perspective | More schools are offering test retakes. But does that make kids less resilient?

Perspective | More schools are offering test retakes. But does that make kids less resilient? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Some fear that retakes create an atmosphere where students and parents consistently demand another chance when they disagree with a grade.

 


“The question of whether or not retakes are fair or productive is beside the point,” she said. “What we should be talking about is that ‘summative’ or ‘cumulative’ assessments, when teachers teach a unit, then there’s a big, comprehensive unit test at the end, is not effective teaching or assessment, and it does not promote true, deep learning. When summative or cumulative assessments are paired with a ‘no retake’ option, we are really failing kids and their learning.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

You remember more of what you read out loud

You remember more of what you read out loud | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Saying words while reading feels slightly awkward and isn’t conducive to all environments, of course, yet it’s an effective method of remembering information, according to an October study in the journal Memory (paywall). Speaking aloud works by creating a “production effect” which cements information in your memory. Meanwhile, hearing words said in your own voice personalizes the references and enhances recollection, according to psychology professor Colin MacLeod and researchers from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Student Motivation

Student Motivation | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Yesterday, I published A Collection Of My Best Resources On Teaching English Language Learners, which brought together many of the materials on that topic that I have either written or collected. A…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Principals! How Much Do You Know About New Science Standards?

Principals! How Much Do You Know About New Science Standards? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Quiz Yourself! How much do you know about how states are using the Next Generation Science Standards, how schools are engaging students in more inquiry-based science instruction, and how STEM teacher retention compares to other fields?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Civil Rights Commission Takes on Issue of Minorities in Special Education and Suspensions

Civil Rights Commission Takes on Issue of Minorities in Special Education and Suspensions | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights—an agency with no policymaking power but with a potent megaphone—took on the complex issue of minority students and special education at a day-long session Friday. 

The name of the session, "The School-to-Prison Pipeline: The Intersections of Students of Color with Disabilities," offered a clue to the stance of some panelists who spoke before the bipartisan commission: That too many students with disabilities are being placed in special education, and once there, they face punitive discipline that puts many of them on a rocky path to incarceration.

"We can't afford to ignore this problem," said Eve Hill, a former deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department's civil rights division. "We're wasting the talents and skills of tens of thousands of children every year." 

But that wasn't a view shared by every panelist, nor by every commissioner. Peter Kirsanow, the only Republican on the commission, said that efforts by the federal government to reduce suspensions and expulsions have led to "unlawful quotas." He also asked if k
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Classroom Management Resources

Classroom Management Resources | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Here are some of the best articles I’ve written on the topic that have appeared in various publications:
Teacher: What happened when my students’ behavior took a ‘major turn for the worse’
Why Viewing Classroom Management as a Mystery Can Be a Good Thing
Teacher: How my 9th graders graded me
Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students
Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
More Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
A “Good” Class Gone “Bad”…And Back To “Good” Again
Five Guidelines For Effective Classroom Management
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Good Teacher?

What Makes a Good Teacher? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Many educators who succeed at raising test scores also fail at keeping students fulfilled, new research suggests.

 


Is a good teacher one who makes students enjoy class the most or one who is strict and has high standards? And are those two types even at odds?


A new study that tries to quantify this phenomenon finds that on average, teachers who are good at raising test scores are worse at making kids happy in class.


“Teachers who are skilled at improving students’ math achievement may do so in ways that make students less happy or less engaged in class,” writes University of Maryland’s David Blazar in the study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Education Finance and Policy.


The analysis doesn’t suggest that test scores are a poor measure of teacher quality, but does highlight the different ways teachers may be effective.

more...
Grupo 6's curator insight, December 9, 11:30 AM
Reflexión Grupo 6:

Una vez leído el artículo, en el cual se recoge que un estudio reciente ha demostrado que los profesores que consiguen grandes puntuaciones para sus alumnos no logran hacer a estos felices, nos surge la pregunta: ¿Cómo podemos compensarlo? El artículo no señala que el resto de profesores sean malos o menos efectivos, pero ofrece la posibilidad de reflexionar sobre lo que sucede en las aulas. 

Es un hecho que los profesores tenemos un impacto en las actitudes y comportamientos de los alumnos. El hecho de que un alumno aprenda ha estado tradicionalmente ligado a recibir información por parte de un “experto” y digerir esa información para poseer el conocimiento necesario. Esto hace que el alumno tenga un papel muy pasivo y por tanto, se aburra. 

Sin embargo, actualmente contamos con cantidad de herramientas que hacen que el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje sea más dinámico y motivador para el alumno, con un papel activo en la construcción de su aprendizaje, favoreciendo la socialización al mismo tiempo. Esto es gracias a las TIC.

Las TIC tienen un gran elemento motivacional para los alumnos y proporcionan herramientas útiles para garantizar aprendizajes de calidad. Por ello, podemos integrarlas en el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje. Pero para tal fin, es necesario reformar muchas concepciones previas de este proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje, así como planificar de forma muy clara cuales son los objetivos y metas que queremos que nuestros alumnos alcancen y os mejores caminos para ello. 

Tecnología y aprendizaje no pueden estar reñidos, es más, a nuestro parecer están condenados a entenderse, ya que ofrecen la clave para promover aprendizajes efectivos, de calidad, con una gran implicación por parte de los alumnos y promoviendo las ganas de aprender.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary knowledge mediates the link between SES and word learning in grade school

Results revealed that vocabulary knowledge significantly mediated the relationship between SES (as measured by maternal education) and word learning. This was true despite the fact that the words in the linguistic context surrounding the target word are typically acquired well before 8 years of age. When controlling for vocabulary, word learning from written context was not predicted by differences in reading comprehension, decoding, or working memory. These findings reveal that differences in vocabulary growth between grade school children from low and higher SES homes are likely related to differences in the process of word learning more than knowledge of surrounding words or reading skills. Specifically, children from lower SES homes are not as effective at using known vocabulary to build a robust semantic representation of incoming text to identify the meaning of an unknown word.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

U.S. Graduation Rate Hits New All-Time High, With Gains in All Student Groups

U.S. Graduation Rate Hits New All-Time High, With Gains in All Student Groups | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The national high school graduation rate has risen to a new all-time high: 84 percent, the fifth straight year of increases, according to data published by the federal government today.

The graduation rate for the high school class of 2015-16 is nearly a whole point higher than the one for the previous year's class, which was 83.2 percent, according to the new data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The rate measures the proportion of each freshman class that earns a diploma four years later.

All groups of students showed improvements, a notable feat. The graduation rates for black students and for students who are learning English each rose 1.8 percentage points in one year. The rates for low-income students and Hispanic students each rose 1.5 points since the previous year. Students with disabilities saw a gain of nearly a full percentage point.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How America Is Breaking Public Education

How America Is Breaking Public Education | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The fix is so simple, but no one will dare to enact it.

 


The ultimate dream of public education is incredibly simple. Students, ideally, would go to a classroom, receive top-notch instruction from a passionate, well-informed teacher, would work hard in their class, and would come away with a new set of skills, talents, interests, and capabilities. Over the past few decades in the United States, a number of education reforms have been enacted, designed to measure and improve student learning outcomes, holding teachers accountable for their students' performances. Despite these well-intentioned programs, including No Child Left Behind, Race To The Top, and the Every Student Succeeds Act, public education is more broken than ever. The reason, as much as we hate to admit it, is that we've disobeyed the cardinal rule of success in any industry: treating your workers like professionals.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Reducing suspensions is unlikely to fix tough schools' underlying issues

Reducing suspensions is unlikely to fix tough schools' underlying issues | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Over the past thirty years, the school discipline pendulum has swung wildly from one extreme to the other, as policymakers have struggled to solve an inherently difficult problem. Today, the “zero tolerance” policies that were all the rage at the end of the last century are generally viewed as heavy-handed and blunt, removing administrator discretion and treating many different kinds of offenses as equally injurious. Yet as the tide of elite—and education reform—opinion has turned against over-suspension, the instinctive response of policymakers has once again been to tie the hands of teachers, principals, and local officials, this time with the explicit goal of reducing the use of suspensions, especially for traditionally disadvantaged groups.


Overall, we agree that suspensions are unlikely to benefit suspended students. But an important question about school discipline is also whether the push to reduce the number of suspensions is harmful to the rule-abiding majority. According to a 2004 study, 85 percent of teachers and 73 percent of parents felt the “school experience of most students suffers at the expense of a few chronic offenders.” And that was before the push to reduce suspensions. A more recent study by the Manhattan Institute’s Max Eden showed that the percentages of students and teachers in New York City reporting drug use, gang activity, and physical fights rose dramatically in the years following discipline reforms initiated by Mayor Bill de Blasio, which require that principals obtain written approval from the city before suspending a student for “uncooperative/noncompliant” or “disorderly” behavior.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

U.S. Fourth-Graders Are Near the Top in Online Reading

U.S. Fourth-Graders Are Near the Top in Online Reading | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

For the first time in 2016, students in the U.S., along with students in 15 other countries, also took a new portion of the test that measures how well students are prepared to read, comprehend and interpret information online.


"This is particularly relevant as young Americans are relying on online resources for news and their main resource for other work," Carr said.


Only three education systems – those in Singapore, Norway and Ireland – had higher scores than the U.S.


"It seems our students perform better comprehending material and navigating content when they're asked to do it online instead of on paper," Carr said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

A "Punishing Decade" for K-12 Education Funding in the States

A "Punishing Decade" for K-12 Education Funding in the States | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Despite recent signs of gradually increasing spending on schools, many states today are devoting significantly less money to K-12 education that they were nearly a decade ago.

That’s the conclusion of a new analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, which finds that in 29 states, total state funding per student on K-12 education—when adjusted for inflation—remains lower than it was during the 2007-08 school year, before the “Great Recession” took hold.

The center’s report, “A Punishing Decade for School Funding,” also found that in 17 states, the percentage drop in total state funding per student was 10 percent or more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Professional Learning That Inspires Change

Professional Learning That Inspires  Change | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Cultivate a Shared Vision


Creating a graduate profile with clear outcomes that the community values is a great way to anchor conversations about teaching and learning in desired outcomes for learners. When a learning community is clear on the purpose, the conversations about strategies, resources, and expectations are grounded in what and how to achieve desired outcomes for students—not program mandates that may or may not be best for the learners in your unique context. When I was working at the University of San Diego, We developed a model to help districts think about the desired competencies that they seek to develop in their students. It’s not meant to be adopted as is, but to inspire conversations, based in research, about the desired student outcomes in your community.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Make Kids Smarter Backed By Science

10 Ways to Make Kids Smarter Backed By Science | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

I’ve explored the science behind what makes kids happier, what type of parenting works best and what makes for joyful families. But what makes kids smarter?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

To Be 'Proficient' in This State, You Have to Be More Than College-Ready

To Be 'Proficient' in This State, You Have to Be More Than College-Ready | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Illinois has decided that in order to be considered “proficient” on its statewide high school test, students will have to earn a higher score on the SAT than the one that’s correlated with college readiness.
The decision has touched a nerve in national testing debates about how states should meaningfully measure high school achievement and report it clearly to parents.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

My Teacher Look: Get Students Back on Track

My Teacher Look: Get Students Back on Track | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A simple way to redirect students and get them back on track. See this and other great teaching tips to help you and students get the most out of your time in the classroom.
more...
No comment yet.