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When Memorization Gets in the Way of Learning

When Memorization Gets in the Way of Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A teacher's quest to discourage his students from mindlessly reciting information
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Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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5 Simple Ways to Improve Teacher Professional Development

5 Simple Ways to Improve Teacher Professional Development | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

A common cry from teachers across the world is for relevant professional development.


A 2014 Gates Foundation study shows only 29% of teachers satisfied with current teacher PD. Another 2015 study shows that only 30% of teachers improve substantially with PD. So, what we have doesn’t seem to be working.


So, what can we do to improve teacher professional development?


[callout]This is a contribution to Cathy Rubin’s Global Search for Education Top Global Teacher Blogger’s Column. This month’s question is about how to improve teacher professional development.[/callout]

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Private Schools Are Losing Students

Private Schools Are Losing Students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
It has been long assumed that if parents were given choices, the overwhelming majority would opt for private and religious schools.  But that has not happened.  For one thing, charter schools are growing, and affordable Catholic schools are closing.  Voucher programs and tax-credit scholarships available in more than a dozen states have not been enough to make up for the losses over the past decade.  That is seen in the percentage changes over the years.  In 2016, private schools educated 11 percent of the nation's student population.  In 1995, they educated 14 percent of the nation's student population.
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How American Students Truly Rank in International Testing

How American Students Truly Rank in International Testing | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Scores on international testing used to judge education systems have remained flat, but the data from the latest tests show American students are in fine shape.

 


“How We’re Really Doing


 


International test score rankings aren’t like college football or basketball, where numbers in rankings matter so a few teams can be selected for bowl games or tournaments.


“Rankings based on international assessments are simple to understand—but they can also mislead,” writes Louis Serino with The Brookings Institution. “While researchers often shy away from using rankings in serious statistical analyses of test scores, they can have a substantial impact on political rhetoric, and consequently, education policy. Media outlets often take these lists and use them in headlines or sound bites, providing little context and furthering educational policy discussion that can often be misleading.”


So how are American students doing? As the Brookings report reveals, America’s scores on the PISA test (Program for International Student Assessment) have remained relatively flat from 2000 to 2014, but the data from the latest TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Assessment) test in 2015 show Americans scored their highest marks in the 20-year history of U.S. tests. One wonders why that wasn’t reported widely.


As for international scores, we need to employ measures with statistical significance, not a number ranking system. Such proper analysis paints a different picture of where America ranks. Among the top 69 countries tested in the PISA rankings in reading, we’re ahead of 42 in reading and statistically tied with another 13, scoring only behind 14 countries. When it comes to PISA math and science, the numbers are lower. For math, we’re ahead of 28, tied with five, and behind 36. Science is a little better; the USA is ahead of 39, tied with 12, and behind 18 countries.”

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The Best Ways to use Video in Class

The Best Ways to use Video in Class | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Jason Griffith, Ken Halla, Dr. Rebecca Alber, Jennie Farnell, Cheryl Mizerny, and Michele L. Haiken share their suggestions on how teachers can most effectively use video in the classroom.
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Why Professional Development Fails

Change Begins at the Edges

Unless there is consistent support and practice, with feedback and evaluation, too often what is read, experienced, and taught have only a moment's life span. Children, parents and colleagues rarely learn what potential was offered and current practice returns. Schools change one teacher at a time or they will simply remain the same at their core. All of us know those who are the teachers on the edge...the ones who are pushing and pulling and agitating others with new thinking and why not questions. Change begins on those edges.
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A School's Way To Fight Phones In Class: Lock 'Em Up

A School's Way To Fight Phones In Class: Lock 'Em Up | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

At a Boston charter school, administrators take students' phones and lock them 


 


At the City on a Hill Circuit Street charter school in Boston, students entering school in the morning are met by administrators fanned out at the front door with their hands out. One by one, they take students' phones, slip them into a soft pouch, and lock them closed with a snap that works like the security tags you find on clothing at department stores. Students take their pouched phones back, but can only unlock them with a special device at dismissal time, nearly eight hours later.

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Video: “Tim Shanahan – Prior Knowledge and Literacy”

Daniel Willingham tweeted out this useful video of literacy specialist Timothy Shanahan talking about prior knowledge. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of…
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How Teacher Checks for Understanding

How Teacher Checks for Understanding | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
In the video below Jasmine has added a question into her lesson just before before independent practice specifically to assess whether students are ready to work productively on their own.

Independent practice is hugely important but only if students know enough to do most of the work successfully.  So Jasmine here sets out with the mindset that part of her lesson design to to allow herself to gather real time data on student mastery and use it to make decisions- even before the lesson has ended.

Once she’s assigned the problem, Jasmine starts circulating intentionally and methodically.

She’s not just giving students individual feedback and encouragement but she’s gathering data on who is where in terms of progress.  You can’t necessarily see it here–we edited the video for length–but she gets to every student in the class in just a few minutes, in part because she has Standardized the Format (technique #3 in Teach Like a Champion) and this has made her observation efficient.
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'Do Not Grade Every Piece of Writing a Student Creates'

'Do Not Grade Every Piece of Writing a Student Creates' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
More grades do not make students better writers, more writing does. Gallagher says that students should write four times the amount of writing than a teacher can actually grade. Hearing this gave me the freedom to provide students with extensive low-stakes, motivating writing practice that I would never grade. In turn, this allows them to develop their craft without the self-restraint that holds them back from taking risks for worry of a lowered grade. No one grades a baseball player's performance in the batting cage. It only counts on the field, in the real world. The same should apply to their writing.
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Research every teacher should know: growth mindset

Research every teacher should know: growth mindset | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

In his series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: an influential research project on growth mindset.

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Why Standards-Based Teaching Has Failed to Raise Reading Achievement

This blog entry explains one important reason why standards-based teaching is not improving reading achievement. There are others--the over-emphasis on teaching, the lack of sufficient and appropriate professional development, the misinterpretation of standards as narrow easily tested skills--all serve to undermine success. Nevertheless, the emphasis on teaching activities instead of on learning will undercut kids learning progress.

Standards-based educational reform goes back to the early 1990s. Since then, test scores have see-sawed a bit, but for the most part, we are doing about as well as we’ve been doing since 1970 (when we first started collecting national reading data).

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5 Mistakes Teachers Make the First Week of School and How to Fix Them

5 Mistakes Teachers Make the First Week of School and How to Fix Them | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Best content around Technology Education selected by the EdTech Update community.
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On gimmicks - David Didau: The Learning Spy

On gimmicks - David Didau: The Learning Spy | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
What is a gimmick? The dictionary defines it as “a trick or device intended to attract attention, publicity, or trade.” So, putting a cartoon tiger on a packet of breakfast cereal in order to attract children’s attention is a gimmick. So is repackaging ordinary Shreddies as ‘Diamond Shreddies‘. In the words of Rory Sutherland, these sorts
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In educational terms then, we will define gimmicks as tricks or devices intended to attract students’ attention in the hope that they will become better behaved or more motivated to work hard. To help us decide whether a teaching intervention can be described as a gimmick we can apply Sutherland’s neat description. Does the practice ‘tinker with perception’, or does it try to change reality?

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Room Arrangement: The Best Ideas About How To Use Classroom Walls

Room Arrangement: The Best Ideas About How To Use Classroom Walls | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
This is definitely not a comprehensive list of ideas and resources – yet.
I hope readers will make more suggestions.
You might also be interested in The Best Posts On The Study Suggesting That Bare Classroom Walls Are Best For Learning.
Here’s what I have so far:
Treating Your Classroom Like “Prime Real Estate” is by Regie Routman at Middleweb.
Is Your Word Wall Really Supporting The Learners In Your Classroom? is by Valentina Gonzalez.
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How To Incorporate More Retrieval Practice In Class

How To Incorporate More Retrieval Practice In Class | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
I’ve been spending some time learning about “retrieval practice” (see The Best Resources For Learning About Retrieval Practice) and thinking about how to incorporate it more into my classes.
Then, yesterday, I read a very interesting piece by Jen McCabe about how she was doing it, and it gave me some ideas.
In my ELL History classes, we often have open-book tests.  These next two Read Alouds and writing prompts that I plan on sharing with students explain what I’m going to be doing (you can download them here).  Check them out and please give me advice on how I can improve them and the plan they are introducing:
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Teacher-Student Relationship is key to Motivation

Teacher-Student Relationship is key to Motivation | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    I’ve done “Twitter Chats” for most of my books where I’ve shared short excerpts from them. I’ve archived them using Storify. However, Storify is going off-line and deleting all conten…
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Five Components of Good Feedback

Five Components of Good Feedback | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

“Everyone needs feedback in order to improve. You would be hard-pressed to identify any profession where it isn’t a central component to success. As I have written in the past, there is nothing more vital to our professional roles than good feedback that paints a picture not only of what we are doing well but areas where we can either become much better or outright improve. It helps us to develop both goals and objectives that guide our work in our respective roles. For the most part, everyone wants good feedback so that they can become better. Jon Windust looked at some research that supports and illustrates how feedback positively impacts performance:
"The researchers found that professionals receiving detailed feedback on a monthly basis outperformed all other groups involved in the study. Those receiving detailed monthly feedback improved performance on their key complaint

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Leaders should encourage mistakes?

Leaders should encourage mistakes? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Failure, mistakes, mishaps — they all play a vital role in helping employees learn and grow. Here are 4 steps to changing office culture to embrace that growth potential.

 


”What do potato chips, Post-It Notes, pacemakers, penicillin, and Silly Putty all have in common?


They were all created by making mistakes. In fact, in each case, the inventor was attempting to create something completely different and thought that he had failed with the final product. Of course, as decades have gone by and profits have been made, the benefit of hindsight tells us that these so-called failures were actually triumphs. It’s like that old adage about Thomas Edison and the light bulb: When questioned on his many failures, he retorted that he hadn’t failed 10,000 times, but succeeded in finding 10,000 methods that wouldn’t work.


Failure, mistakes, mishaps — they all play a vital role in helping employees learn and grow, too. Unfortunately, however, organizations penalize mistakes and create employees that are risk-averse and too shy or nervous to try anything new. A recipe for stagnation, the best companies are those that encourage failure, embrace o

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Is the effort to curb strict discipline going too far, too fast? - The Hechinger Report

Is the effort to curb strict discipline going too far, too fast? - The Hechinger Report | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

The pendulum started to swing back in 2014 when the Obama administration issued a 7,500-word letter warning schools against racial discrimination in discipline. While some districts were already working to reduce suspensions, the federal push spurred more schools to revamp their disciplinary procedures. So, too, did the growing body of evidence documenting the harm associated with pulling students out of school: One study, for example, found that students’ chances of dropping out doubled with their first suspension. Today, most of the nation’s largest school districts are actively trying to reduce out-of-school suspensions, while more than 25 states have passed legislation to accomplish the same goal.
But Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has put school discipline back on the table by telling reporters she is “looking closely” at whether to change the 2014 federal guidance, which some conservative critics have blamed for sowing “classroom chaos.” The Department of Education declined to offer more details on its plan, but it has already sparked pushback: In mid-December, more than 50 members of Congress sent DeVos a letter opposing any changes.

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3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

There is a common theme that many leaders struggle with: they don't know how to hold their people accountable. Even if they are great at hiring A players, many leaders still are left with that feeling that their people could be doing more or better work.

Rather than first finding fault with the employee, a great leader looks first at him or herself. And when you take that look in the mirror, you might find that you have not been effective at holding your people accountable for their results.

The good news is that you can rectify this today and become a better leader with the help of three simple steps:

1. Be clear


2. Follow up


3. Be honest & coach them up

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Aiding Reading Comprehension With Post-Its

Aiding Reading Comprehension With Post-Its | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A simple, low-stress strategy that helps students engage with, understand, and remember what they read.

 


”Storing Memory With Patterns
Understanding and remembering texts, as with all new memory construction, involves connecting the new to the known (i.e., using existing memory networks). The brain does this linking through its system of storing memory in neural networks based on relational patterns. When exposed to new information, the brain evaluates it using patterns it has developed through time and experience. Optimal brain engagement, understanding, and storage occur when new information is identified as being related to an existing memory pattern such as a category or schema.”

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Growth mindset: practical tips you may not have tried yet

Growth mindset: practical tips you may not have tried yet | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Schools and teachers across the world have embraced Carol Dweck’s theory of growth mindset in the hope of helping students to fulfil their potential. Popular strategies include tweaking the way teachers give feedback, encouraging self-reflection through questioning and, crucially, praising processes instead of natural ability.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, January 8, 1:39 PM
There are good ideas here: explore multiple strategies, be stealthy rather than controlling, engage parents, and explore your own mindset.
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Rural Districts Face Challenges and Opportunities with Technology Access

Rural Districts Face Challenges and Opportunities with Technology Access | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Taking the digital leap requires broadband access, proper funding and the right people on board.

 


More than half of school districts and about one-third of public schools in the United States are in rural areas. Rural districts have unique challenges, ranging from poverty (23.5 percent of children in rural areas were poor in 2016, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture) and vast distances (many rural children ride the school bus for long periods each day) to a lack of affordable internet access.

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Avoiding 'Missed Opportunities' in Writing Instruction - Pt. 2

Avoiding 'Missed Opportunities' in Writing Instruction - Pt. 2 | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Role of Correcting, Teacher as facilitator: Teachers often ask me, "How do I correct their writing when there is so much to correct and how do I go about telling them what to fix?" I have a few guidelines that might help teachers in thinking about when and how to correct.

Ask yourself, have I taught the students the error they are making? If you know that you have already taught a rule, a spelling pattern, a convention, sight words, transition words, etc. then you have to hold students accountable. Provide a list of all the things you have covered that they should go through and check for. Editing checklists of what was taught in YOUR classroom. Sometimes we provide standard editing checklists, but they are not as meaningful as those that come from what they know and was taught in your class. As teachers of writing we often do a lot of editing practice by correcting our students' papers and having them just fix the errors WE found. This practice does not lead to transfer. Students do not pay attention to what they are fixing and why. Guide them to find their own errors by providing a familiar checklist and hold them accountable.

Correct a "chunk" of the writing with the student first. A chunk can be a paragraph, a page, an introduction, a short portion of the writing and make note of the errors they are making in a small section to apply throughout the rest of their writing. Students will make common errors throughout a piece of writing. If we focus on a small chunk they can begin to apply it throughout the rest of their writing.

Notice and focus on one teachable moment at a time. These are the moments when we do one on one conferring with students. Show them one new strategy or skill as a writer and have then apply it throughout the text. This is an opportunity to teach them something new as a writer to work on as they improve their writing.
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, January 3, 11:42 AM

While I was working as a training illustrator for the military it was critical to check that the words matched the images of equipment or concepts the objective trained soldiers to utilize. Writing skills can be developed in any content field. Creating a need for the student to verbally communicate demands the student be able to apply learned writing skills to make meaningful communication.

 

Two things are helpful for improving writing skills in any field even if one is not trained in teaching English.

 

  1. Finding self-help enabling sources of reference to ensure memory of pre-learned writing skills helps successful written communications to be developed and also will guide the student to build out from those skills by applied use in any written communication used in real life application.

 

  1. Review Noted taking skills.

Note taking for later reference is a skill today’s students have come to except the teacher or boss to deliver to them rather than master note taking. Note taking is a self-study that helps the student communicate ideas to internalize study reflection and thought. This internalization is a critical thinking skill.

 

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Professional Learning Is More Meaningful When Done as a Team

Ongoing professional learning is critical in any profession, including education. It is through professional learning that you acquire skills to help you do your job better, gain insight on how to resolve ongoing issues, and build a network of colleagues who you can continue to learn from. 
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