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7 Characteristics of Great Professional Development - TeachThought PD

7 Characteristics of Great Professional Development - TeachThought PD | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
As the end of the school year draws to a close, administrators start pulling together their PD plans for the summer in preparation for the next year. Meanwhile, teachers sit anxiously by with the dread that can only come with the anticipation of the dreaded PD days that their contract says they must attend. It’s not that teachers don’t want to grow and improve their craft. They do, and they find it refreshingly professionalizing when they get to. It’s just that this ain’t their first rodeo. They’ve been made to sit through pointless professional development in the past and they lament that they’re thinking “how long will this last and what will I have to turn in…and when is lunch?” as they trudge toward the library down the hallway that so obviously lacks the normal student energy they’ve used as fuel for the past 9 months. But it doesn’t have to be like that. In fact, if we do things well, teachers are likely to come away from their professional development energized and excited.

Via John Evans
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Teaching & Learning Toolkit

The Teaching & Learning Toolkit is an online resource summarising the global evidence base for 34 approaches to lift learning outcomes.
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Parent-Teacher Conferences ... or Collaborative Conversations?

Parent-Teacher Conferences ... or Collaborative Conversations? | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
For productive parent-teacher conferences, teachers can team up with students' families, encouraging them to take a more active role in driving the conversation.
Marianne's insight:

Some excellent practical advice in this article.

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The Surprising Truth About Learning in Schools | Will Richardson | TEDxWestVancouverED

We know how to help kids develop into powerful learners. Now, we just need to make that happen in schools.

"A parent of two teen-agers, Will Richardson has spent the last dozen years developing an international reputation as a leading thinker and writer about the intersection of social online learning networks and education.

Will has authored four books (with two more on the way), including ""Why School? How Education Must Change When Learning and Information are Everywhere"" (September, 2012) published by TED books and based on his 2013 TEDx talk in Melbourne, Australia. ""Why School?"" is now the #1 best-selling TED book ever.

A former public school educator of 22 years, Will is also co-founder of Modern Learner Media and co-publisher of ModernLearners.com which is a site dedicated to helping educational leaders and policy makers develop new contexts for new conversations around education.

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juandoming's curator insight, December 15, 2015 6:17 AM

Afegeix el teu visió ...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, December 15, 2015 8:19 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

Mark Cottee's curator insight, August 13, 2017 8:01 PM
Great summary of the current situation (US or Australia).
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For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters - Mind/Shift @willrich45

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters - Mind/Shift @willrich45 | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
“Work that matters” has significance beyond classroom walls; it’s work that is created for an authentic audience who might  enjoy it or benefit from it even in a small way. It’s work that isn’t simply passed to the teacher for a grade, or shared with peers for review. It’s work that potentially makes a difference in the world.

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Teachers as Learners: 6 Great Professional Development Ideas | Edudemic

Teachers as Learners: 6 Great Professional Development Ideas | Edudemic | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Most teachers consider themselves life-long learners. As professionals, teachers are required to complete a certain amount of professional development (PD) every few years to keep their certification current. Usually this PD looks like speakers coming to teacher’s meetings, or educators attending conferences or taking courses at a local college. While these opportunities are ways to advance their craft, many teachers find that they don’t get much as they should from sitting in meetings or classes.

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Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, July 24, 2015 9:35 AM

Texas teachers.  This is a great resource for those of you piloting T-TESS, the new Texas teacher appraisal system.  You will have a form similar to the Teacher Self Report.  You will be setting goals and setting up plans for your professional development.  This list may give you ideas to include in planning your self improvement as a teacher.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, July 29, 2015 2:04 AM

Només un resum: Si no t'agrada aprendre, no t'agrada ensenyar...els professors com aprenents questions essencials!

Ben Bempong's curator insight, July 31, 2015 6:21 PM

PD are definately beneficial to teachers and educators.  PD days are pretty informative as they create new ways to inform teachers with current reform and change in the field of education.  It will be awesome to invent new ways to incorporate other forms of administering PD to teachers.

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3 Courageous Questions Great Teachers Ask Parents at the End of the Year - Brilliant or Insane @AngelaStockman

3 Courageous Questions Great Teachers Ask Parents at the End of the Year - Brilliant or Insane @AngelaStockman | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Before you turn in the key to your classroom door and head out into the sun for the summer, there are three courageous questions you might want to ask parents at the end of this year.

Asking can be as easy as sending a quick email or putting an online survey together, but if you have the time and the ambition, give them a call. These questions are that important, and the answers you receive will serve you well into the future. Calling up the courage and making the time to ask them will let your students and their families know how much they matter to you, too.

Via John Evans
Marianne's insight:

Love this, but wouldn't wait until the end of the year to ask these questions.

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The GROW Model: A Simple Process for Coaching and Mentoring

The GROW Model: A Simple Process for Coaching and Mentoring | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Use this simple model to structure coaching and mentoring sessions with team members.
Marianne's insight:

Love this from our 'Day with Dan' yesterday.  Immediately useful.

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A Problem-Solving Game For Teachers and Administrators

A Problem-Solving Game For Teachers and Administrators | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
A simple game can bring educators together to talk about pain points and observations, and ultimately, find a solution.
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A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days - a sobering lesson learned - Granted, and ...

A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days - a sobering lesson learned - Granted, and ... | Leading Learning | Scoop.it

"The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building. Because her experience is so vivid and sobering I have kept her identity anonymous. But nothing she describes is any different than my own experience in sitting in HS classes for long periods of time. And this report of course accords fully with the results of our student surveys. 

 

I have made a terrible mistake.

 

I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding. Most of it!"


Via John Evans
Marianne's insight:

What a powerful thing to do!

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 12, 2014 7:02 PM

What common sense!  Years ago when I was teaching government, I found that some kind of experiential approach, and getting the students to follow their own interests when possible in a classroom, was much more effective. -Lon

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How to bring the flipped classroom model to professional development - Daily Genius

How to bring the flipped classroom model to professional development - Daily Genius | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
flipped classroom professional development
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Four Leadership Lessons From the Pope

Four Leadership Lessons From the Pope | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
He may not have an M.B.A., but Francis knows how to run an organization.
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50 people and hashtags you MUST check out on Twitter

50 people and hashtags you MUST check out on Twitter | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Getting connected professionally on Twitter was the single most important, most powerful thing I ever did as an educator.

The most important. I’m not overstating that.

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Educational Leadership:Working Constructively with Families:When Students Lead Parent-Teacher Conferences

Marianne's insight:

Great practical 'sentence starters' in this article but i would like to see more opportunity for parent questions and input also.

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10 Characteristics of Professional Learning That Shifts Practice

10 Characteristics of Professional Learning That Shifts Practice | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Across diverse districts I have asked teachers how they like to learn and what they want out of their professional learning opportunities. Over and over I hear the same kinds of responses and wishes for how they could learn.  There is a deep desire to develop their practice, not just be talked to but be inspired, valued, and pushed to take their practice to the next level.  To help teachers shift their practices and make learning experiences for their students the best they can be, these are the desired characteristics of professional learning that shifts practices:

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Where Good Ideas Come From | KarmaTube

Where Good Ideas Come From | KarmaTube | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Where do ideas come from? Do they come to us in a "eureka moment" like Isaac Newton's proverbial apple falling on his head? Steven Johnson's research shows that it takes a long time (the slow hunch), and a space of sharing (the liquid network) for us to come up with our best ideas. In this TED talk, Johnson focuses on spaces of creativity and shared patterns of innovation that encourage us to connect ideas rather than protect them. "Chance favors the connected mind."
Marianne's insight:

'Chance favours the connected mind'

Probably not for students, but definitely food for thought for educators.

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'Growth mindset' is not just for school students, teachers can grow their minds too

'Growth mindset' is not just for school students, teachers can grow their minds too | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Most educators would be aware of the term ‘growth mindset’ by now. The idea is you can work on being smarter. Whatever abilities and talents you have are just a starting point, if you work hard, make mistakes and keep trying, you can achieve. Teachers are using it to encourage and motivate children in their classrooms.

But there is another application for this idea; it can be used as an underlying ethos for the professional learning of teachers.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 4, 2015 9:37 AM

We used to complain about "drill and kill" activities in school. Now we have "test to be the best" even though we know standardized test results are not the best proof of student learning.


I think that growth mindset for federal, state, district, and building education leaders as well as teachers could be an amazing thing. @arneduncan @forrestclaypool

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, August 14, 2015 4:22 AM

Zijn we of worden we? Welke insteek kies jij?

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8 Things to Look For in Today's Classroom

8 Things to Look For in Today's Classroom | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
As I think that leaders should be able to describe what they are looking for in schools I have thought of eight things that I really want to see in today's classroom.  I really believe that classro...

Via Beth Dichter
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TWCLibrary's curator insight, May 25, 2015 7:55 PM

Good insight and suggestions to achieve this

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 24, 2015 11:13 AM

Thx Beth Dichter

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, June 25, 2015 2:36 AM

Clear and easy to understand!

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Flipped Learning: The Big Picture

Flipped Learning: The Big Picture | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
As we progress rapidly into the middle of the second decade of the 21st century, questions continue to be raised about how education addresses the ever ..

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 5, 2015 11:11 PM

This post includes the inforgraphic (shown above) as well as additional information on pros and cons of flipping a class.

The sections in the post are:

* Flipped Learning for a Flipped World

* Flipping the Numbers

* Flipping to Engage Active Learning

* Flipping from Passive to Active

* In a Nutshell

You may find new ideas in this post that will allow your learners to be be more engaged

Elizabeth Roman's curator insight, April 29, 2015 8:44 PM

Infografía sobre el aprendizaje invertido: ¿Qué apoyo se necesita? ¿Qué se hace dentro y qué se hace fuera del aula?

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, April 30, 2015 2:45 AM

Un de plus sur la classe inversée.

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How Student Centered Is Your Classroom?

How Student Centered Is Your Classroom? | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
Check out these questions to guide you in reflecting on how much the learning environment you have designed promotes student voice and choice.
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The Guilded Age: Professional Learning Communities in Education

The Guilded Age: Professional Learning Communities in Education | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
By Walter McKenzie A millennium ago, artists and artisans formed guilds to share expertise and support one another in highly-skilled professional practice. These vibrant learning communities sustained artistry and craftsmanship through the dark ages when centers of learning were exclusive and rare. Much like these medieval guilds, professional learning communities (PLCs) provide a new dimension to professional development as educators flock around high-interest needs and topics. By definition, P
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20 Education Quotes: Wisdom For The Future Of EDTECH

Values that inspired "Skillagents.com, a self-paced online course developed to sharpen your instructional design skills" http://www.skillagents.com *No amount …
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Educational Leadership:Engaging the Whole Child (online only):The Neuroscience of Joyful Education

Educational Leadership:Engaging the Whole Child (online only):The Neuroscience of Joyful Education | Leading Learning | Scoop.it
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