Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Exactly

Exactly | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

We are who we are. Race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, pregnancy, citizenship, family status are examples of immutable characteristics. "An immutable characteristic is any sort of physical attribute which is perceived as being unchangeable, entrenched and innate." --Wikipedia

 

These characteristics are used to classify protected groups of people under the law to safeguard against discrimination. It is important to be aware how immutable characteristics may affect the way we respond in certain situations. Fortunately, behavior may be modified and responses changed.

 

Our music, food and political preferences may also be affected by these characteristics. Other factors may come into play as well. For this reason, it is good to get to know different people in context and reserve judgement.  -- V.B.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Who is the person who lives this life paraphrases Parker Palmer. The world acts on us, but we have the opportunities to make choices.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, August 14, 2014 5:26 PM

Know yourself. Be yourself. ❤ 

 

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Confuse Students to Help Them Learn

Confuse Students to Help Them Learn | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Forcing them to work past impasses can promote deeper levels of comprehension, researchers find.

Via Alfredo Calderón
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Learning is confusing. We are continuously trying to put pieces together in a puzzle without the finished picture provided.

 

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The nurturing and social reform models of teaching and their relevance to connectivist online learning

The nurturing and social reform models of teaching and their relevance to connectivist online learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The point of empathy is good teachers remember what it was like to learn and not always be successful in their learning. Nurturing and caring does not ignore the content. Teaching these ways supposes that the content is important and it is pedagogy that helps learning happen.

 

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for the love of learning: John Oliver on the Wealth Gap and Inequality

for the love of learning: John Oliver on the Wealth Gap and Inequality | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The key to great schools and great learning is great teaching. I wonder if we eliminated tests what would happen to the correlation between test writing and socio-economics?

 

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More Poetry on Teachers and Teaching

More Poetry on Teachers and Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Last month I began a feature on poetry about teachers and teaching. Poets who write about teaching are educators, students, and non-educators. Across the globe, they share a common experience of be...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Teaching is poetry. Poetry is teaching.

 

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The real teachers inspired by Dead Poets Society

The real teachers inspired by Dead Poets Society | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
One of Robin Williams's most famous roles was an English teacher. It's inspired thousands of real teachers.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I critiqued the movie when I was completing my Master of Education. Teachers watching this movie can see what it means to live at the vulnerable intersection of public and private life. It is an ecotone where there is constant wave action and transforming who the teacher is.

 

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The Importance of Informal Learning (Infographic)

The Importance of Informal Learning (Infographic) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via bill woodruff
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Informal learning might be seen as what happens outside School forming students' and teachers' personal curricula which mingle with the planned curricula presented by educationalists outside the classroom.

 

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Global parenting habits that haven't caught on in the U.S.

Global parenting habits that haven't caught on in the U.S. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

If there's one thing have in common with those , it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be.

Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

Some might make American parents cringe, but others sure could use a close study. Vietnamese mothers, for instance, get their kids out of diapers by 9 months.

Read on for a sampling of parenting lessons from around the world:

1. In Norway, kids nap outside even in subzero temperatures

In Norway, . When a kid turns 1 year old, he or she starts going to Barnehage (Norwegian for "children's garden"), which is basically state-subsidized day care.

Parents pay a few hundred dollars a month and their kids are taken care of from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Toddlers spend a ton of time outside at Barnehage, even in extremely cold temperatures. It's not uncommon to see kids bundled up outside during a Scandinavian winter, taking a nap in their strollers.

Even with the obvious benefits provided by the government in Norway, some parents complain about the lack of creativity in people's approaches to parenting.

One American mother wrote:

"There's a sense that there's just one right way to do things. And everyone does it that way. In America there are different parenting styles — co-sleeping, attachment parenting, etc. Here there is just one way, more or less: all kids go to bed at 7, all attend the same style of preschool, all wear boots, all eat the same lunch ... that's the Norwegian way."

2. Vietnamese moms train their babies to pee on command

Here's a good one. In Vietnam, parents . Kind of like Pavlov with his salivating dogs. Except this is moms with peeing babies. The Chinese do it too, apparently. Parents start by noticing when their baby starts peeing and making a little whistle sound. Soon enough, the baby starts to associate the whistle with peeing and voila!

Think this sounds a little odd? Or a little like someone is conflating a kid with a pet schnauzer? Well, researchers say Vietnamese babies are usually out of diapers by 9 months. What do you think now?

3. Traditionally, Kisii people in Kenya avoid looking their babies in the eye

Kisii, or Gussii, moms in Kenya carry their babies everywhere, but they don't indulge a baby's cooing. Rather, when their babies start babbling, moms .

It's likely to sound harsh to a Western sensibility, but within the context of Kisii culture, it makes more sense. Eye contact is an act bestowed with a lot of power. It's like saying, "You're in charge," which isn't the message parents want to send their kids. Researchers say Kisii kids are less attention-seeking as a result.

4. Danish parents leave their kids on the curb while they go shopping

In Denmark, writes Mei-Ling Hopgood in How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm, "children are frequently left outside to get frisk luft, or fresh air — something parents think is essential for health and hearty development — while caregivers dine and shop."

As you might imagine, this idea sends shivers down the spines of many parents in the United States. In New York, a couple (one of whom was Danish) was arrested for leaving their child outside a BBQ restaurant while they went inside to eat.

"I was just in Denmark and that's exactly what they do," Mariom Adler, a New Yorker out walking with her 2-year-old son, told the . "We would see babies all over unattended. We were stunned, frankly. But Denmark also struck us as exceptionally civilized."

5. In the Polynesian Islands, children take care of children

We're not talking any old big brother baby-sitting little sister here. We're talking organized kid collective.

Hopgood writes in her book that adults take the lead in caring for babies in Polynesia, but as soon as a child can walk, he or she is turned over to the care of other children.

"Preschool-aged children learned to calm babies," she wrote, "and toddlers became self-reliant because they were taught that that was the only way they could hang out with the big kids."

Jane and James Ritchie, a husband-and-wife anthropology team, observed a similar phenomenon over decades in New Zealand and the Polynesian Islands. But they don't think it would fly in the United States.

"Indeed in Western societies, the degree of child caretaking that seems to apply in most of Polynesia would probably be regarded as child neglect and viewed with some horror," they wrote in Growing Up in Polynesia.

6. Japanese parents let their kids go out by themselves

Parents in Japan allow their kids a lot of independence after a certain age. It isn't uncommon for 7-year-olds and even 4-year-olds to ride the subway by themselves.

Christine Gross-Loh, author of Parenting Without Borders, lives in Japan for part of each year, and when she's there she lets her kids run errands without her, taking the subway and wandering around town as they may. But she wouldn't dare do the same back in the United States.

"If I let them out on their own like that in the U.S., I wouldn't just get strange looks," she told . "Somebody would call Child Protective Services."

7. Spanish kids stay up late!

Spanish families are focused on the social and interpersonal aspects of child development, according to Sara Harkness, a professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut.

The idea of a child going to bed at 6:30 p.m. is totally alien to Spanish parents, Harkness told TED.

"They were horrified at the concept," she said. "Their kids were going to bed at 10 p.m." so they could participate in family life in the evenings. The same is true in Argentina, according to Hopgood.

8. Aka pygmy fathers win the award

For the Aka people in central Africa, the male and female roles are virtually interchangeable. While the women hunt, the men mind the children. And vice versa.

Therein lies the rub, according to professor Barry Hewlett, an American anthropologist. "There's a level of flexibility that's virtually unknown in our society," Hewlett told . "Aka fathers will slip into roles usually occupied by mothers without a second thought and without, more importantly, any loss of status — there's no stigma involved in the different jobs."

This flexibility, apparently, extends to men suckling their children. Ever wonder why men have nipples? That's why.

9. French kids eat everything

Set mealtimes; no snacking whatsoever; the expectation that if you try something enough times, you'll like it. These are among the "food rules" in France that are taken as given. The result is , from foie gras to stinky cheese. Tell that to my nephew.

This story came from our partner .

 


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Education has some cultural implications. School does as well, but the two are not the same. What do the cultural implications mean in both? What do they mean in a "multicultural" country (whatever that means) like Canada?

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, August 13, 2014 2:40 PM

An interesting perspective on parenting.

 

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Commons Thinking Offers a Road Map to Transform Society | On the Commons

Commons Thinking Offers a Road Map to Transform Society | On the Commons | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Michel Bauwens, founder of the P2P Foundation, was invited to chair a research team exploring the possibilities for “fundamentally re-imagining” Ecuadorian socity on the basis of commoning, open networks and peer production.  The Quito-based project sought ideas from people of all walks of life for 10 months, and released their Transition Plan (available in English here)  in June. Bauwens offers his personal analysis of the process below.  

 

 


Via jean lievens, YACOUBAHIEN
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What does government mean in this article? Is it the people? Is it a group who think they know what is best for the people? The commons idea is embedded in localizing the work. I am just concluding some time in Maine and found the word commons used as a gathering place for local place. What does this look like in a "globalized and digital world?" Is it what people want? We assume it is but I am not sure it always is.

 

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Active players in a network tell the story: Parsimony in modeling huge networks | Rechavi | First Monday

Active players in a network tell the story: Parsimony in modeling huge networks
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Yes, the data gathered can be parsed and provide some information about the whole network, but the key word is some. We should not conclude that it speaks accurately for the whole system, but offers insights.

 

Humans as key players are different than other players in complex systems as they act emotionally and can do unpredictable things.

 

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for the love of learning: Without Tenure...

for the love of learning: Without Tenure... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

We don't use the word tenure in Alberta, but are slowly engaging in the same discussion. It is a way that politicians, bureaucrats, and technocrats can pretend they are changing School. This is not change  for the good. It will change School, but is it what we want?

 

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Thinking about where I am going

Thinking about where I am going | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings August 13, 2014 Thinking about where I am going “Sooner or later something seems to call us onto a particular path… this is what I must do; this is what I’ve got to have. This is who...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I have just begun to read James Hillman's work and it is powerful. The opening quote speaks to vocation and calling as necessary in the work called teaching. Without that calling and something drawing us to it, it is difficult to have right relationships with students and the world.

 

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Qualities Of Good Teachers

Qualities Of Good Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Good teachers are rare. Although some qualities of good teachers are subtle, many are identifiable. Here is a list of traits that excellent teachers share.


Via Dan Kirsch, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I think the fifth one is the key one for good teaching and teachers.

 

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Lynda Hastings's curator insight, September 15, 2014 3:15 PM

If I had to rate these traits, I think I'd go with 3, 12 and 14. What about you?

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What is Authentic Assessment? (Authentic Assessment Toolbox)

A form of assessment in which students are asked to perform real-world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knowledge and skills -- Jon Mueller

 

"...Engaging and worthy problems or questions of importance, in which students must use knowledge to fashion performances effectively and creatively. The tasks are either replicas of or analogous to the kinds of problems faced by adult citizens and consumers or professionals in the field." -- Grant Wiggins -- (Wiggins, 1993, p. 229).

 

"Performance assessments call upon the examinee to demonstrate specific skills and competencies, that is, to apply the skills and knowledge they have mastered." -- Richard J. Stiggins -- (Stiggins, 1987, p. 34).


Via Alfredo Calderón
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Authentic assessment is the opportunity for students to choose projects that enable them to demonstrate their learning. This means a broad rubric of choices might be available. It is about teachers helping students with parameters and guiding them along the process.

 

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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, August 16, 2014 2:10 PM

"Authentic Assessment" - this phrase continues to be used in so many different situations to mean so many different things. It's worth taking time to reflect and determine what it means to each of us. The quotes and information helps to provide a starting point for a deeper reflection about what Authentic Assessment might look like in a classroom, with particular students, in a school-wide initiative or as a personal exploration of growth. 

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Let’s stop trying to teach students critical thinking

Let’s stop trying to teach students critical thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many teachers say they strive to teach their students to be critical thinkers. They even pride themselves on it; after all, who wants children to just take in knowledge passively? But there is a problem…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The way critical thinking is taught is conforming and complying to a preset answer. It is a Socratic Circle which returns the student to the "right answer." What we might want to consider is a truly democratic environment where students explore different ways of understanding what they are learning. Critical thinking is about an environment where students engage in ways that enable them to draw on their previous learning and not be involved in harmful practices.

 

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Content and continuous learning: The cornerstones of a learning architecture

Content and continuous learning: The cornerstones of a learning architecture | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What separates powerful learning and development organizations from the middling crowd? A May 2014 report from Bersin by Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP looking at the role of a learning architecture identifies what high-impact learning organizations (HILO's) are. In short, they actively make use of their technology, modalities and learning architecture in support of L&D objectives.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I wonder if architecture is similar to Foucault's archeology? Continuous learning is about subjects and content that inspire us to learn.

 

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Give children time to play alone and explore the world, says academic

Give children time to play alone and explore the world, says academic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Letting children play alone helps them develop crucial skills linked to higher academic achievement, according Cambridge University lecturer Dr David Whitebread.

Via Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is where they are most creative. Play has no end goal. It is just play in this moment. It is the work of children so easily forgotten in the bureaucratic malaise of School.

 

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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 14, 2014 3:54 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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Teachers, is there much difference in our perceptions?

Teachers, is there much difference in our perceptions? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings August 14, 2014 Teachers, is there much difference in our perceptions? “The delineation of the difference between modern (secular) society and traditional (Sacred) societies and thei...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Karen Barad in Meeting the Universe Halfway used the term "matter that matters" to describe the entanglement within the universe. The closing poetry summarizes the article well. We are all connected and we are all connected to the universe. Quantum mechanics is beginning to show this, but many wisdom traditions knew it intuitively and what that meant in teaching and learning.

 

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 14, 2014 11:33 AM

This is well worth reading, and very much worth thinking about.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 14, 2014 3:55 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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Are you good at mathematics?

Are you good at mathematics? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Smartest Kids in the World has me thinking a lot about the different disciplines, especially math. Sure, kids have "favorite" subjects ranging from Art to Science, depending on the kid and usua...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is a short article that speaks about the need to mingle the subjects together and bring them to life with real life applications.

 

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How Learning Profiles Can Strengthen Your Teaching

How Learning Profiles Can Strengthen Your Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here's a heretical notion: Learning profiles can actually benefit students. Blogger John McCarthy shares his tips.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I am not sure that learning profiles are the same as meeting children where they are in their learning each day and perhaps each moment. That was the phrase I used and it sounds somewhat like what is described here.

 

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What Differentiation Is (And Is Not)

What Differentiation Is (And Is Not) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What is differentiated learning, anyway? Is it synonymous with personalized learning? Or personal learning?

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The key point for me was the first one. This is an old idea which is making another comeback. With all due respect to Carol Ann Tomlinson, others i.e. Dewey before her made us aware of the need to work individually with each student.

 

It does not take anything away from Tomlinson's work and it is important to keeping it on the front burner in School.

 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, August 13, 2014 3:16 PM

While I am now seeing less emphasis on "differentiation" and more emphasis on "personalized learning" as eduspeak, this is definitely worth reading so that you're on the same page as your teachers and admins. The library, by definition, is a differentiated space and that's a good conversation starter...

Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's comment, August 14, 2014 4:13 PM
Agreed, Ivon. Effective teachers have always known that not all students learned or grasped the same way. Perhaps the important point is to remember this fact in our current climate of "same test, same day, same results" thinking.
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elephantjournal on Instagram

elephantjournal on Instagram | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Herelephant is dedicated to bringing together those working (and playing) to create enlightened society (one photo at a time).

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Here are some more excellent quotes.

 

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Voices from the Margins

Voices from the Margins | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A welcoming space for the voices of resistance from the margins.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The graphic and poem are captivating. There are links to other posts about teaching.

 

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The powerful but often invisible influence of school culture...

The powerful but often invisible influence of school culture... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
  “Big Idea”: School culture trumps innovation.  The impact of school culture on the continuous improvement of teaching and learning cannot be ignored by administrators and teacher leaders. It...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is not just the culture of the school. It is the culture School is embedded in that counts and we need to pay attention to. We often ignore this and it seems we think we can change our School somehow without consideration for broader constraints. Those external constraints, political, bureaucratic, technocratic, etc. are real and impose barriers that are not easily overcome. They are impossible to overcome if we ignore them and pretend they do not exist.

 

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The Science Behind Classroom Norming

The Science Behind Classroom Norming | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Blogger Todd Finley explores the value of Classroom Norming to help learners.

Via Amy Burns
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

We were using this language 20 years ago and now it is re-emerging. This is interesting? What if we used Judith Butler's work about identity and norms that impact identity formation? Perhaps a more critical approach to the way norms form in classrooms and School i.e. conforming and complying would be revealing.

 

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Amy Burns's curator insight, August 12, 2014 9:50 AM

Instead of posting a list of 37 classroom rules, consider discussing and adopting norms.