Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Neuroscience Of Mindfulness: How To Make Your Mind Happy - Barking Up The Wrong Tree

Neuroscience Of Mindfulness: How To Make Your Mind Happy - Barking Up The Wrong Tree | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Research shows mindfulness makes you happier. But nobody ever really explains how it works. Here's the neuroscience of mindfulness and how it can help you.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It took some scrolling to get to a salient point for article. It is a quote from Sharon Salzberg. To paraphrase, mindfulness allows to decide whether we want to nourish this or let it go? It is not about eradicating thoughts. By being mindful we might become more thoughtful.
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For teens, a good mood depends on good sleep

For teens, a good mood depends on good sleep | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teens need eight to 10 hours of sleep at night to feel good and function well the next day, a new data show.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A good night's sleep with screens turned off early is essential for students.
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The surprising science of happiness

The surprising science of happiness | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dan Gilbert, author of "Stumbling on Happiness," challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want. Our "psychological immune system" lets us feel truly happy even when things don’t go as planned.

Via David Hain, Ian Berry
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This was part of a PhD course I took. Dan Gilbert's work is fascinating. It is not just about being happy. It recognizes that we will be unhappy and what that means. How do we overcome trauma and challenging situations?
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David Hain's curator insight, October 18, 5:56 AM

Do you know what makes you happy? Or are you misdirecting yourself?

Ian Berry's curator insight, October 20, 6:59 PM
Love David Hain's questions Do you know what makes you happy? Or are you misdirecting yourself?
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Adaptive or Transactional Leadership in Current Higher Education: A Brief Comparison | Khan | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Adaptive or Transactional Leadership in Current Higher Education: A Brief Comparison

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Soizic Merdrignac aka @SoizicAbidjan, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The conclusion makes sense. No organization, including schools, can use one form of leadership to move forward. The complexity is such that leading well is adapting and moving between styles depending on context. It is like good teaching.
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Is Meaning Lost when Data is Exported?

Is Meaning Lost when Data is Exported? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If you take data out of context, does it lose its meaning? This question constantly plagues Steven Gaudino, VP of Product Management at Reasoning Mind.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Ines Bieler, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is. Context means something and is essential to the data. Culture, language, and social status among other things have a bearing on the outcomes. As a teacher, I understood each day and each person was different. Differences make a difference.
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Victor JG Macanas's curator insight, May 14, 7:50 AM

Keep clam and think chinese: Context is everything, always!

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Three things to consider when you are thinking about leaving the tenure track (essay)

Three things to consider when you are thinking about leaving the tenure track (essay) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Fatimah Williams Castro offers three steps to consider when exploring your career options.


In last week’s blog post, I shared a bit about my journey considering a life and career beyond academic teaching and research. As a first-generation college student, the first in my family to earn a doctorate and a woman of color, my stepping off the tenure track could not be decoupled from community, professional and social responsibilities. I experienced the struggle that many Ph.D.s describe when they venture out into the broader world of work, attempting to refashion their selves and their careers in new and sometimes strange ways.(...) - Inside Higher Ed, by Fatimah Williams Castro, January 27, 2017


Via Collectif PAPERA, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an  interesting article for me at this time.
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Students should knit, paint and cook to ward off stress and depression, experts say | #Research #Creativity #EQ

Students should knit, paint and cook to ward off stress and depression, experts say | #Research #Creativity #EQ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, wanted to find out if engaging in normal creative acts make people feel better. An analysis of the information found a pattern of more enthusiasm and higher ‘flourishing’ following days when the undergraduates were more creative.

Study author Dr Tamlin Conner said: ‘There is growing recognition in psychology research that creativity is associated with emotional functioning.

‘However, most of this work focuses on how emotions benefit or hamper creativity, not whether creativity benefits or hampers emotional wellbeing.’

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Empathy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Soft+Skills

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Students enjoy cooking and art. I did not use knitting, but know teachers who organize knitting clubs. These are times for conversation and sharing.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 25, 2016 7:11 AM

Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, wanted to find out if engaging in normal creative acts make people feel better. An analysis of the information found a pattern of more enthusiasm and higher ‘flourishing’ following days when the undergraduates were more creative.

Study author Dr Tamlin Conner said: ‘There is growing recognition in psychology research that creativity is associated with emotional functioning.

‘However, most of this work focuses on how emotions benefit or hamper creativity, not whether creativity benefits or hampers emotional wellbeing.’

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren: 

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Empathy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Soft+Skills

 

Víctor Xepiti Eme's curator insight, November 25, 2016 10:16 AM

"Cooking a meal from scratch or knitting a jumper can ward off depression in students, new research suggests. While painting, drawing and writing also helps to boost a sense of wellbeing to keep spirits high."...

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“A new study shows,” Education, and the Media

As I continue to document, the mainstream media believe everyone is an expert on education (except educators, of course). In today's two-experts-collide, know-nothing David Brooks comes out against GPA while latching onto Angela Duckworth's "grit" sequel that is poised to maintain her racism/classism train to fame and fortune. As John Oliver has now confronted (see…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Research which generalizes tends to abstract and make theoretical. What it means in each classroom context is an important question. It will mean something different even from day to day.
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Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post

Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.

 

Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.

 

So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.

  

"Direct instruction" does increase scores on the tests the instruction is aimed toward, even with very young children. This self-fulfilling prophecy is not surprising. But multiple studies also show that the gains in performance are fleeting -- they completely wash out after 1-3 years when compared to children who had no such early direct instruction.


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Gust MEES, Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Teaching and education are relational, thus hard to define and hard to measure. Perhaps, Paul Ricoueur's ideas about narrative work better where we use metaphors, myth, and poetic language.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 16, 2015 11:50 AM
Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.


Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.


So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.


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Ontario Research - 21st Century teaching and learning


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is timely as I move into some polishing work on a dissertation.

 

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University research: if you believe in openness, stand up for it

University research: if you believe in openness, stand up for it | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Publishing openly provides greater exposure, boosts prospects and can lead to more citations, says Erin McKiernan

 

We spend years teaching our children to share. Yet from the moment students enter academia, we discourage it. Lock up your work in prestigious subscription journals; keep your data close to your chest; compete instead of collaborate – these are the messages transmitted by peers and mentors. These are the tenets of our unhealthy academic culture. We need to change our priorities.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Sharing our research is important, but forgoing vigor in publishing could be problematic. For example, what makes an open source published article strong? There is a a need to explore something different that allows publication, openness, and vigor.

 

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 24, 2014 3:48 PM

Open Education = Open Research?  Research behind the paywall vs research delivered by keyword search on Google or Bing?

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:33 AM

Research and Global Open Access Initiatives

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A shocking statistic about the quality of education research

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A research study about research studies comes up with a cautionary finding.

 

For more than a decade, school reformers have said that education policy should be driven by “research” and “data,” but there’s a big question about how much faith anyone should have in a great deal of education research. This is so not only because the samples are too small or because some research projects are funded by specific companies looking for specific results, but because in nearly all cases, it appears that nobody can be certain their results are completely accurate.


“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”



Via Gust MEES, Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The concept of replication has never made sense to me. We should be reproducing and reconstructing. Reproducing and reconstructing are not about identical. They are about checking more data against the original data collected. One can never replicate/duplicate the same situation so it is about similarities rather than exactness.

 

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Educate Massachusetts's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:49 PM

Data is significant yet can be deceptive.  We are developing human potential and there are aspects where data is not as reliable to success as we portray.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 23, 2014 11:42 AM

This article is about the low value placed on replication studies. It does not call into question all education research! I'd like to see how this replication issue compares to other social sciences before dismissing all ed research! 

Dylan-oliver Sinclair's curator insight, August 24, 2014 10:48 PM

What information should be taught in schools and universities? This topic is suggesting marketing companies have influence over learning and teaching.

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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This looks like an interesting article.

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How Breathing Calms Your Brain, And Other Science-Based Benefits Of Controlled Breathing

How Breathing Calms Your Brain, And Other Science-Based Benefits Of Controlled Breathing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The brain science of breathing is revealing much about how controlled breathing influences our emotions, regulates stress and anxiety levels, and affects other factors central to mental and physical health.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being mindful and aware of our breathing is helpful in many ways: calms us, regulates blood pressure, affects memory, may improve metabolism and improve immune system, etc.

It is interesting that mystics have understood this for centuries.
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The Cognitive Benefits of Gratitude – The Mission – Medium

The Cognitive Benefits of Gratitude – The Mission – Medium | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Be honest, I’m not here to judge you. The last time I complained was this morning. It’s easy to complain, and in some ways, it feels good to do. It’s a verbal expression of our slight discomfort, an…

Via Ian Berry
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being grateful benfits our well-being.
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Ian Berry's curator insight, November 18, 5:04 PM
I can personally vouch for this. 40 years ago I faced a life threatening illness. My doctor suggested "an attitude of gratitude" was a key to getting well. Not only was he right he was also right that such an attitude is key to living life.
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HOW TO ENGAGE IN PSEUDOSCIENCE WITH REAL DATA: A CRITICISM OF JOHN HATTIE’S ARGUMENTS IN VISIBLE LEARNING FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A STATISTICIAN | Bergeron | McGill Journal of Education / Revue des...

HOW TO ENGAGE IN PSEUDOSCIENCE WITH REAL DATA: A CRITICISM OF JOHN HATTIE’S ARGUMENTS IN VISIBLE LEARNING FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A STATISTICIAN | Bergeron | McGill Journal of Education / Revue des... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
HOW TO ENGAGE IN PSEUDOSCIENCE WITH REAL DATA: A CRITICISM OF JOHN HATTIE’S ARGUMENTS IN VISIBLE LEARNING FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A STATISTICIAN
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The author critiques John Hattie's methodology in this scholarly text.
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“Why is your research important?” – Society

“Why is your research important?” – Society | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One of the strongest arguments for the importance of basic research is that without it, the scientific discoveries and technological innovations of the last century with the greatest societal impact would have been impossible. Without basic research, it is unlikely that we would have cell phones, computers, or the internet. We wouldn’t have advances in green energy, or even an understanding of why developing green energy sources might be important for our future. And we wouldn’t have new cancer treatments, HIV drug development, or the emerging promise of personalized medicine and genome editing. For all of these incredible advances, tracing back to the scientific discoveries making them possible inevitably reveals important but obscure research done by scientists not interested in creating the next Earth-shattering technological innovation, but instead just trying to use science to understand why and how things work the way they do.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research is essential to improve teaching and learning. The key here is we stand on the shoulders of those who come before. We question what is taken-for-granted. It is not just quantitative research, but mixed methods and qualitative that add to the science. John Dewey used the etymology of empiricism, which means "a rule fo thumb." That is where we begin. Classroom teachers can add to the research if given opportunities and time.
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Sharrock's curator insight, June 15, 9:32 AM
Science teachers and social studies teachers alike need to be able to answer questions similar to this question. By using history to support scientific discoveries as accidents is not enough to drive home the idea that exploring to understand how and why things work out of curiosity can lead to future benefits that may save mankind. This is a powerful statement: "Basic research is generally done to further scientific knowledge without obvious or immediate societal benefits. If, like me, you do basic research, the question about why your research is important for society is difficult to answer." It can begin with this article.

The mindset against basic science is similar to the argument for turning education into a commodity, something to make a profit or to "get rich" with. Learning more about something serves humanity regardless of whether the understanding leads to immediate profit, immediate benefits, or leads to the solution to some future, unexpected problem. 
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Teacher Agency to Change Education

Teacher Agency to Change Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The power of teacher collaboration: challenges and steps to take.
Via Ines Bieler, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teacher agency, performing who we are, and discovering personal and collective voice are essential to teaching. Although the author makes a valid point about action research in schools, it has largely been co-opted and needs to be revisited to break down the neo-liberal agenda prevalent in our schools. This can begin with a move to become more active and political.
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The Best Collections Of Education Research – 2016 via @LarryFerlazzo

The Best Collections Of Education Research – 2016 via @LarryFerlazzo | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I do lots of posts about education research, including my own year-end “round-up.” Other places have begun to do the same thing, so I thought I’d create another “Best”…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are some good links here.
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Survey: Teaching demands taking toll on educators

Survey: Teaching demands taking toll on educators | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new survey reveals teachers are concerned and frustrated with shifting policies, an outsized focus on testing and a lack of voice in decision-making. 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Although this is an American study, I think it applies more broadly. There is a need to look at local contexts, but, but when I invite teachers to interview, the shifting pedagogic landscape, lack of time, and lack of voice are expressed.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 13, 2016 6:54 PM

Didn't need a survey to know this! Thanks to Ivon Prefontaine.

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How to Move from First Person to Learner Centered Teaching (EdSurge News)

How to Move from First Person to Learner Centered Teaching (EdSurge News) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In a famous essay about characters in fiction, the novelist Mary McCarthy wrote, “We are the hero of our own story.” I’m often reminded of this in my work, helping faculty to improve their teaching. After classroom observations, when I ask instructors how they thought it went, they naturally thin

Via Ramiro Aduviri Velasco, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am finding that teachers do focus on students and it could be they need to see teaching as something they do more. It is a challenging paradox with no easy answers.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 30, 2016 8:07 PM
I am finding that teachers do focus on students and it could be they need to see teaching as something they do more. It is a challenging paradox with no easy answers.
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Mastering "Doctorateness": Helping Graduate Students Understand How to Move from ABD to PhD, Spring 2012

How we define doctorateness varies somewhat by discipline, but there are some common characteristics of doctoral quality--such as the ability to engage with the literature in the discipline and use its theoretical foundations to create new knowledge; the ability to abide by principles of research ethics; and to theorize about research findings in a meaningful and creative way. So if we created a word cloud for doctorateness, different disciplines would share the same core qualities, but would add unique competencies and traits around the edges of the word cloud. In nursing or occupational therapy, reflective practice would probably be one of the words; in psychology, mastery of advanced multivariate statistics would probably appear. (An interesting new website, wordle.net, creates word clouds from any text.)

Via Sharrock, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The last part of the journey, the dissertation, is challenging. It is often the time when we are most alone and uncertain.

 

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Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"A few years ago, I came across some interesting research by cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg. He claimed that the mark of an expert writer is not years of practice or a hefty vocabulary, but rather an awareness of one’s audience. This made sense to me, and I wondered if it were true in other disciplines as well."


Via Beth Dichter, Agisa Abdulla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The article provides a broad summary with links and references to studies and work done in specific areas.

 

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Joy Power's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:21 AM

Important research on learning for achievement.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:53 PM

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:51 PM

Research about how self-awareness can help you tap your learning potential

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School Starts Too Early

School Starts Too Early | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The later high school classes start in the morning, the more academic performance improves

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Why don't we change? This is something so-called reformers can change if they have the will.

 

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 25, 2014 7:24 AM

We knew this, didn't we?  Adolescent brain research supports it.

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:36 PM

We often take school schedules as being fixed without questioning why they are as they are and if they meet the needs of our students.   Looking at the needs and natural dispositions of student as the basis for planning can lead to some very interesting innovations in how, where, and when we teach and learn.

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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

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RJ Lavallee's curator insight, February 13, 2015 7:41 AM

Alfie Kohn. Brilliant