Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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An Interview with the Master: Robert Greene on Stoicism

Except for the Stoics themselves, no one has influenced me as a reader and writer more than Robert Greene. Which is why I was nervous but excited to interview Robert about Stoicism and this ancient…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a blending of Stoic philosophy and other philosophy in this interview. A significant point is that philosophy at one time was practical and focused on helping people in daily living.
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People with creative personalities really do see the world differently 

People with creative personalities really do see the world differently  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Our new research found that there are certain aspects of a person’s personality that can influence their creativity.

 

Psychologists often measure creativity using divergent thinking tasks. These require you to generate as many uses as possible for mundane objects, such as a brick. People who can see numerous and diverse uses for a brick (say, a coffin for a Barbie doll funeral diorama) are rated as more creative than people who can only think of a few common uses (say, for building a wall).

 

The aspect of our personality that appears to drive our creativity is called openness to experience, or openness. Among the five major personality traits, it is openness that best predicts performance on divergent thinking tasks. Openness also predicts real-world creative achievements, as well as engagement in everyday creative pursuits.

 

As Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire explain in their book Wired to Create, the creativity of open people stems from a “drive for cognitive exploration of one’s inner and outer worlds”.

 

This curiosity to examine things from all angles may lead people high in openness to see more than the average person, or as another research team put it, to discover “complex possibilities laying dormant in so-called ‘familiar’ environments”.

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Via Kim Flintoff, Gust MEES, Yashy Tohsaku, Miloš Bajčetić, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Creative people do see the world differently. What is essential is that we are all creative. The key is that we value some creativity more than others. Teaching is/was a creative space for me. Do others understand teaching as creative.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 29, 2017 2:35 AM

Our new research found that there are certain aspects of a person’s personality that can influence their creativity.

 

Psychologists often measure creativity using divergent thinking tasks. These require you to generate as many uses as possible for mundane objects, such as a brick. People who can see numerous and diverse uses for a brick (say, a coffin for a Barbie doll funeral diorama) are rated as more creative than people who can only think of a few common uses (say, for building a wall).

 

The aspect of our personality that appears to drive our creativity is called openness to experience, or openness. Among the five major personality traits, it is openness that best predicts performance on divergent thinking tasks. Openness also predicts real-world creative achievements, as well as engagement in everyday creative pursuits.

 

As Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire explain in their book Wired to Create, the creativity of open people stems from a “drive for cognitive exploration of one’s inner and outer worlds”.

 

This curiosity to examine things from all angles may lead people high in openness to see more than the average person, or as another research team put it, to discover “complex possibilities laying dormant in so-called ‘familiar’ environments”.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Creativity

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity

 

Paulette Dotson's curator insight, June 9, 2017 11:21 AM
Everyone interprets the world around us from their perspective.  Science says creative people see the world differently.
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T.S. Eliot Reads from his Most Famous Poems: 'The Waste Land,' 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' & 'The Hollow Men'

T.S. Eliot Reads from his Most Famous Poems: 'The Waste Land,' 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' & 'The Hollow Men' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The T.S. Eliot of the post-World War I period was a poet who stood Janus-faced on the threshold of old and new worlds. He looked backward to the mountain ranges of European tradition and marveled at their alpine peaks.
Via bobbygw
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
As Jacques Derrida argued, we cannot have post-modern without accepting the modern. The two influence each other and are entwined.
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An updated #Feynman experiment could lead to a Theory of Everything #LOL

An updated #Feynman experiment could lead to a Theory of Everything #LOL | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

For over a century, the two leading theories in physics have had irreconcilable differences, and scientists have scrambled to find ways to square them, to no avail. An experiment proposed in 1957 by American luminary Richard Feynman, is now getting a makeover, and the results could be significant.

 

Scientists at Oxford University and University College London (UCL), are attempting to overhaul one of the late Nobel Laurette’s experiments and in doing so, hope to heal the rift in a dramatic fashion. Could a Theory of Everything be near? This would be incorporating all four physical forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces, into one solid working theory.

 

Thus far, theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg, himself a Nobel Laurette, has only been able to combine electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force. A final theory—as Weinberg calls it, would mark the end of physics as we know it. Although the laws of general relativity and quantum mechanics work exceptionally well in their own spheres, some of the rules that govern one area don’t work in the other, and vice-versa. For instance, Relativity explains the gravitational force as it relates to bodies on Earth or in space. But it falls apart on the quantum level.


Via THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Whenever Richard Feynman and Albert Einstein are mentioned I am interested.
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THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY's curator insight, January 29, 3:12 AM

It would mark the end of physics as we know it.

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The Myth of the Starving Artist and Other Misconceptions about Creativity

The Myth of the Starving Artist and Other Misconceptions about Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Art for art’s sake was a creed of the 20th century bohemians, and on the surface, it sounds like a good idea. We should not create work that is functional or commercial, the argument goes, but rather…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Jeff Goins argues that starving is not the end-all in art. Making money and marketing are essential to artistry.
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Five Manifestos for the Creative Life

Five Manifestos for the Creative Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How a numbered list can start a personal revolution.

Some days everyone needs a little extra encouragement. The words or lines or colors

Via Jasmin Rez
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

A pretty interesting set of manifestos.

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Jasmin Rez's curator insight, July 8, 2013 12:09 AM

"You may not be a Picasso or Mozart but you don’t have to be. Just create to create. Create to remind yourself you’re still alive. Make stuff to inspire others to make something too. Create to learn a bit more about yourself.”