Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next?

A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The article has a servant-leadership flavour to it. The challenge is to get past rhetoric to substantive action.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:22 PM


Our world is suffering greatly at the hands of people who have placed their desire to be right above the desire to achieve the right outcome. They confuse their need for an ego boost, their quest for power, and their thirst for greed with leadership. Many of the symptoms of poor leadership we’re seeing today may seemingly resolve themselves in the near term, but the greater problem won’t go away on its own.

Shakira A. Ali's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:45 PM

Frankly, I think we're looking for leadership in all the wrong places. I saw an interesting comment by Neil DeGrasse, astronomer and scientist. He observed that more than half of congressional seats are filled by lawyers - people who rely on the SKILL of arguing a point as a means of WINNING a point. This has nothing to do with whether the points made are true, moral, ethical or move society forward in any way.  Maybe we should be looking among the "masses" - those people who are living and working everyday to make life better "on the ground," so to speak. Entrepreneurs. Community organizers and activitists. Those who sit-in and protest and work in food kitchens and community gardens. These are the people who are coming up with solutions on a daily basis, and are unconcerned with, "scoring points."

Martha Bowring's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:01 PM

use in class

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5 Signs It's Time for You to Change Careers

Many people hate change; contemplating the unknown is scary. So many stick with familiar things even though they no longer fit. This is especially true of careers. Sometimes people get stuck in a career direction or work environment that makes them terribly unhappy, and they stay there because it's tough to change careers once you have gained experience, power, and good compensation.

 

People often end up in the wrong careers by accident. They start out with a job and become proficient, so they advance and make a good living. They may even start a company in that field. They get so focused on growth, meeting objectives, or making the money to support their lifestyle, they don't realize how toxic their life has become.


Via The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I left School before any of these became too engrained. I look back in incredible experiences with students and some colleagues with considerable fondness. Other colleagues and bosses less so.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Sometimes you just end up following the wrong career path and it takes someone else to objectively point it out. Here are 5 signs you can identify on your own.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, July 28, 2014 6:36 PM

If you recognise these signs then it may be time to consider a career change.

James Cracknell's curator insight, July 29, 2014 4:24 AM

Recognise any of these? - I felt many of them in my career but one that is not mentioned is guilt. Guilt that you are doing a job that many would crave for; guilt that you feel this way at all; guilt that you constantly keep asking that there must be more to life yet how would others that you love feel about a sudden urge to change?

 

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Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?

 

It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.

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Who Needs Rebels at Work?

Who Needs Rebels at Work? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Carmen Medina "I promise to read the book and make sure to keep it from all the people in my group. Last thing I need are rebels." The above is a genuine reaction we received from a longstanding friend about our new book "Rebels at Work: A Handbook for Leading Change [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kevin Watson, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

But rebelling is not just about rebelling. It is about changing the way things are done and the paradigm within which it is done. Retaining neo-colonial and patriarchal ways does not change anything.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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donhornsby's curator insight, January 14, 2015 2:51 PM

Rehabilitating your Troublemakers. Corporate leaders may worry that Rebels at Work will create gangs of rebellious employees (cue Les Miserables). But the reality is rebels are already inside your corporate gates and increasingly unhappy. Many of them have the potential to become positive forces for your organization — to become good rebels. For that to happen, however, employees need different skills and managers need more effective ways of managing individuals who think differently.

Joe Boutte's curator insight, January 16, 2015 8:12 AM

Rebels who still understand the vision of the organization and find new ways to stir the pot and innovative approaches to achieving the objectives are needed in every organization.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The 10 Most Endangered Jobs

The 10 Most Endangered Jobs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A new study released Tuesday by job-search site CareerCast.com, lists the 10 top endangered jobs in the U.S. Using data on 200 jobs from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, CareerCast projected the least promising career paths in terms of future employment growth, income potential and existing unemployment in the job field.


Via The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The list is less interesting than the idea that School is based on a fixed notion of knowledge in curricula. What this means for children is they need to learn transferable skills, aptitudes, and attitudes. Is that what is happening in School? This means making their learning more concrete and in the moment which is what thinkers such as Dewey and Whitehead proposed.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 16, 2014 6:24 PM

Want some job security in the future? Avoid any career involving paper — and that includes newspapers.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership

Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Teams are still top-down structures. Community is messier and more complex, but can involve many more people. When we open up community, we will hear dissenting voices. So forget guiding coalitions and teams and go for messy and complex.

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