Leadership in healthcare
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It's time to stop bullying in the NHS – for the sake of patients - The Guardian

It's time to stop bullying in the NHS – for the sake of patients - The Guardian | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
The Guardian It's time to stop bullying in the NHS – for the sake of patients The Guardian Bullying in the NHS is a serious problem.
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Hospital Food Shake-Up Announced By NHS Chiefs - Sky News

Hospital Food Shake-Up Announced By NHS Chiefs - Sky News | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
BBC News
Hospital Food Shake-Up Announced By NHS Chiefs
Sky News
The rules will be legally binding and are aimed at putting an end to unhealthy and inedible meals on the NHS.
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Nurses and Technology: 4 Tips for Effective Use of Social Media - Nurturing Your Nursing Career

Nurses and Technology: 4 Tips for Effective Use of Social Media - Nurturing Your Nursing Career | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it

Let's face it: social media has pervaded our world, and it can't be ignored. Some people see social media as a trivial waste of time, but it can be an important communication tool if used effectively. In the healthcare world, nurses can use social media to connect with other nurses, to learn more about various patient illnesses and what it's like to live with those illnesses, to engage in meaningful healthcare conversations, and to discuss trends in healthcare.

 

An article published in the February 2014 issue of Johnson & Johnson'sNursing Notes lists several tips for nurses to follow as they share knowledge and engage in meaningful healthcare conversations via social media. The top four tips are as follows:

Keep it professional. Nurses should maintain a professional persona and tone when engaging in social media communication related to their nursing careers. This includes refraining from dispensing any specific or personal medical advice or nursing diagnoses.
 Consider everything to be public. It's important for nurses to keep in mind the public nature of all social media sites. Even when conversing on a private forum, nurses should assume that anything they post can be seen by anyone. Thus, just like in face-to-face conversations, nurses must abide by rules and policies related to patient confidentiality and privacy.
 Listen. As mentioned previously, social media sites allow nurses to engage in meaningful conversations related to healthcare issues and trends. However, nurses should be sure to fully observe and understand all discussions before adding to them. Nurses should not broadcast unwarranted medical thoughts and opinions just because they can.
 Speak up! When used effectively, social media can help nurses position themselves as meaningful leaders and advocates in the healthcare industry. The nursing voice is an important part of any healthcare conversation, and it can have a powerful impact when inserted appropriately.

For additional information on the use of social media as it relates to nursing, take a look at the American Nurses Association's Social Networking Principles Toolkit. To engage in conversations related to nursing education, visit The College Network'sFacebook and Twitter pages. Also, stay tuned for part two of this "Nurses and Technology" series to learn about the use of other new technology in the healthcare setting.


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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, August 31, 2014 12:55 PM

It is good to see that other professionals are finding how to useful social media can be. 

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Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Part 1

Part 1 of a series of short films I shot and edited for Warwickshire County Council to highlight the importance of safeguarding adults.
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Nurses banned after frail resident lost over a stone in weight at Rochdale ... - Manchester Evening News

Nurses banned after frail resident lost over a stone in weight at Rochdale ... - Manchester Evening News | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
Manchester Evening News
Nurses banned after frail resident lost over a stone in weight at Rochdale ...
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Health before the NHS 1 The Road to Recovery

Timeshift: Robert Winston narrates the shocking story of health in Britain before the National Health Service. In the early 20th century, getting treated if ...
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Sir David Nicholson talks about the new NHS Leadership Academy

Sir David Nicholson talks about the importance of leadership at all levels of the NHS and the leadership challenge facing the NHS. He outlines the importance...
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Quantum Leadership: The Role of the Nurse Leader | Jones & Bartlett Learning

Quantum Leadership: The Role of the Nurse Leader | Jones & Bartlett Learning | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
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Medical engagement | The King's Fund

Medical engagement | The King's Fund | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
by John Clark  and Vijaya Nath July 10thIncl. Report downloadWhat is good medical engagement? In those organisations where it exists, how has good medical engagement been created and sustained? These questions are at the heart of this report, which builds on earlier work from The King’s Fund on medical leadership.

This report is based on case studies of four NHS trusts with acknowledged high levels of medical engagement. It aims to help other organisations that are seeking to create cultures in which doctors want to engage more in the management, leadership and improvement of services. Based on interviews with a range of executives, senior and junior doctors, the report presents key features of each of the four trusts. Its final analytical section highlights common themes and includes a checklist to allow organisations and individuals to assess how far medical engagement is being sought and developed.


Key Findings

Medical engagement needs to be part of an overall organisational approach, from board to ward, and needs time to evolve. It is a journey that requires doctors to be motivated and to assume greater engagement with and responsibility for improving the quality of patient care in partnership with clinical and non-clinical colleagues and with input from patients.The four trusts studied have all enjoyed long-term stable leadership, creating a firm foundation for cultural change. Senior leaders have shown total commitment to medical engagement and leadership.All four trusts have clear strategies based on quality running throughout the organisations. The distinguishing feature is that these strategies form a way of working for the organisation – they are not isolated programmes.Each trust has embraced a strong medical leadership structure with doctors in leadership roles at divisional and departmental levels, supported by managers. Despite making great progress, none claims to have a completely embedded medical engagement culture. Each trust puts considerable effort and resources into selecting senior staff including consultants, and none takes the stance that clinical expertise is sufficient.Well-developed appraisal and revalidation processes exist in all four trusts. Talent management and leadership development are taken seriously, through education and training, and learning from other organisations.


Policy into practice implications

Medical engagement should be an integral part of the culture of all health care organisations and should be a priority for NHS boards and leaders.It requires investment in development and training and also in governance arrangements to support the culture.
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rob halkes's curator insight, July 14, 2014 11:00 AM

Must read to be inspired!

Report of case studies about developing "medical engagement." Although the term hasn't been defined precisely in the report it denotes its meaning at two points. It is stated that medical engagement is intended to lead to "...enhanced clinical and organisational outcomes, and to real benefits for patients and staff.."(p.39). Also, it is said in the conclusions, that a "..sustained and collective vision" .. will enable to create an "..organisational culture where all staff, particularly doctors, are motivated to share in delivering the highest quality of care." (p.41)

In summary, what is needed to bring about this fundamental change, is, in my words:

- an overall and integrated program, led by explicit starting points that may act as a guiding philosophy,

- a collective leadership that endorses and leads the change,

- explicit selection of doctors and staff, with the needed attitude and intentions, also a program of development, training and learning that initiates and continues inspiration to the right development, and

- enough time to make it work and allows for genuine change.

So, in retrospect, the report tells us that change and development is hard work like any implementation of innovation and development. The distinction here, in the report, is the concrete case findings and examples of how it was brought about. That makes it very worthwhile to read it.

However, some comment is in order: patients' benefits are only indicated but mostly absent from the report. It is all about the staff and doctors' activities directed to "medical engagement" - a strange term for a self evident responsibility to a medical institute. But if the terms helps to motivate, that is fine with me, but in my personal reflection, in these cases, it has little to do with patient engagement.

Add to the project a working method with patients, in a co-creative way and patient benefit will readily arise!
See here for further information about co-creation in care.

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Why are doctors so reluctant to be leaders in the NHS? - The Guardian

Why are doctors so reluctant to be leaders in the NHS? - The Guardian | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
The Guardian Why are doctors so reluctant to be leaders in the NHS?
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The Skinny: Facebook Etiquette for Nurses

The Skinny: Facebook Etiquette for Nurses | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it

Health professionals need to pay special attention to Facebook etiquette. These days, almost everyone is on Facebook. It is a great tool for keeping up with distant friends and relatives—those we don’t see every day. But what if a patient sends you a friend request? Is there special etiquette for nurses and other healthcare professionals? Actually, there is! Here’s a rundown of things to keep in mind before you accept that request:

Privacy, Confidentiality and Professional Liability

The use of social media tools like Facebook present a problem for healthcare workers—privacy. HIPAA laws are not limited to the workplace and can be especially tricky when corresponding with a patient on a social network. Imagine that your patient posts to Facebook that she feels better. It would probably be okay if you responded with “I’m so glad to hear that,” but if you were to mention her care or medication, then you would have violated her privacy rights. Also consider that patients might want to ask you questions about their health. Even if this is done via private messaging, it can still turn into an issue of professional liability.

Even if you aren’t friends with any of your patients, discussing patient care online can lead to trouble. Any personal health information or identifiers that could lead to another person online determining whom you are discussing is strictly off-limits. While you might think that mentioning your 94 year old patient is harmless, age is considered to be an identifier in some situations. You may be making what you think is the most innocent comment in the world, but intention doesn’t matter when it comes to breaching patient confidentiality.

Employer Policy

Check to see whether your employer has a policy on this subject. While institutions may not have rules that strictly forbid this, some may discourage this type of relationship because it blurs the line between patient and provider. Your patients may be better off not knowing too much about your personal life, and there are probably some things you would rather not know about them, as well.

Social Media as a Character Reference

And finally, even nursing students and prospective students need to take special heed of Facebook etiquette. It is common for nursing programs to look at applicants’ social media pages to get an idea of their character. A nursing program might pass on an applicant who frequently posts pictures of himself engaging in questionable behavior. This idea can be extended to nurses who are interviewing for jobs. Any negative references to previous employers can cast a bad light on an applicant.

Misuse of social media has resulted in nurses being disciplined, fired, and even held liable for monetary penalties, but has also kept prospective nurses out of the profession. If you want to learn more about Facebook etiquette or the issue of using social media, you can see the National Council of State Boards of Nursing’s “A Nurse’s Guide to the Use of Social Media”, which can be found on their website. While this guide refers primarily to issues of privacy, it is helpful for understanding the personal liability and consequences that can result from a careless comment—whether harm was intended or not.

 


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One Simple Truth of Leadership - @TimElmore

One Simple Truth of Leadership - @TimElmore | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
Because we, at Growing Leaders, believe in the power of using images to communicate truth—we plan to post a cartoon once in a while with a point to it. As far as I’m concerned, leaders must keep a sense of humor as we work with our teams and certainly as we work with students. It’s …

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:57 AM

Love this visual humor tool!

AnnC's curator insight, August 26, 2014 8:10 PM
Leaders need to think about who they are leading -DUH!
M Dolores Solé Gómez's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:23 AM

Leadership is important for workplace health promotion. Good leadership = good health (or almost)

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Safeguarding Winterbourne View 5min Video summary needs volume on full

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About personal health budgets - Patient choice - NHS Choices - Linkis.com

About personal health budgets - Patient choice - NHS Choices - Linkis.com | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
Personal health budgets are being introduced by the NHS to help people manage their care in a way that suits them. Find out how it works.
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How do we create a climate that puts the needs of patients first?

How do we create a climate that puts the needs of patients first? | Leadership in healthcare | Scoop.it
Nothing less than a transformation of NHS systems, leadership and culture is needed if the Francis inquiry is to be acted on, says Nicola Hartley
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Chris Ham: the final report from the 2012 NHS Leadership Review

Chris Ham introduced the key findings of our year-long review into NHS leadership at our recent Leadership and Management Summit. Comparing it to last year's...
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transformational leadership in nursing

I do not take credit for the music in this video. (Final Fantasy- Sad Violin and Deadmau5-Ghosts and stuff). Please no negative comments :)
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Privatisation of the NHS: Allyson Pollock at TEDxExeter - YouTube

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The 1948 Act establishing the NHS gave the Secretary of State for H...

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