Leadership and Spirituality
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Leadership and Spirituality
What role does spirituality play in leadership? It makes the leader whole and fill the hole in the whole of the organization
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL
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Empathy Lesson One: Empathy is different than compassion

Empathy Lesson One: Empathy is different than compassion | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

One reason that empathy training programs have not worked or have had mixed results is that they train the participants in compassion, being nice, conflict resolution, baby and child care, and a number of worthy and related tasks. This is all excellent, and the use of empathic methods in these areas is making the world a better place, so keep it up.

 

There is nothing wrong with being nice and so on. Pardon the double negative: don’t not be nice. But something is missing – empathy. Expanding one’s empathy requires an engagement with one’s own inauthenticities around empathy. Most people would rather not look at their own blind spots about empathy. Most people would rather not look at how their own empathy breaks down and fails. Expanding one’s empathy requires engaging with one’s own resistance to empathy. Until we engage with our own resistance to empathy we will remain stuck in our blind posts, break downs, burn outs, and compassion fatigue.


Via Edwin Rutsch, Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Empathy is the ability to relate to what another person or other people are experiencing. It is not just loving and sharing with them. It is being able to relate in some manner to their experiences.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Coaching Leaders
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The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You)

The DDI report reveals a dire need for leaders with the skill of empathy. Only four out of 10 frontline leaders assessed in their massive study were proficient or strong on empathy.

Richard S. Wellins, senior vice president of DDI and one of the authors of the High-Resolution Leadership report, had this to say in a Forbes interview a year ago:

We feel [empathy] is in serious decline. More concerning, a study of college students by University of Michigan researchers showed a 34 percent to 48 percent decline in empathic skills over an eight-year period. These students are our future leaders!

We feel there are two reasons that account for this decline. Organizations have heaped more and more on the plates of leaders, forcing them to limit face-to-face conversations. Again, DDI research revealed that leaders spend more time managing than they do "interacting." They wish they could double their time spent interacting with others. The second reason falls squarely on the shoulders of technology, especially mobile smart devices. These devices have become the de rigueur for human interactions. Sherry Turkle, in her book, Reclaiming Conversation, calls them "sips of conversations."

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Empathy and emotional intelligence are essential to leading and performing. Central to these are face-to-face conversations with people and providing people with time for conversations, instead of relying on digital tools and social media. Sherry Turkle refers to those as "sips of conversation."
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David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 2017 6:15 AM

The state of empathy in leadership - and it's not healthy!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 26, 2017 1:41 AM

We are human so empathy must be part of our leadership style or we are nothing but robots.

Bay Jordan's curator insight, June 26, 2017 6:18 AM
Really useful insights here for anyone who relies on others to deliver performance - which is most of us! 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from A Change in Perspective
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The fallibility of memory - can you believe me?

The fallibility of memory - can you believe me? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
While taking his regular morning walk, listening to a podcast, market researcher Mike Beder stopped dead in his tracks.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not sure leaders are leaders without empathy and sympathy. This is essential to relate to those one leads i.e. students. Understanding what they might be experiencing, at least in part, is essential. How did I feel as a student? I think this relates to the currere method.
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Why Empathy Holds the Key to Transforming 21st Century Learning

Why Empathy Holds the Key to Transforming 21st Century Learning | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Empathy -- the ability to understand another person's experiences and emotions -- can be a powerful learning tool for students and an important outcome of

Via Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What I found in my recent research and dissertation was the teachers I interviewed shared a common feature: empathy and sympathy for others.
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Don’t Worry: Be Happy

Don’t Worry: Be Happy | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
What if You Didn’t Have to Worry About Yourself? Have you ever had people annoy you at work? Or maybe family members whose little habits bothered you? Have you been frustrated by a store clerk or waiter, or maybe another driver? What about frustration with your kid...

Via The BioSync Team, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Mindfulness is such a powerful way to live. It is simple, but difficult to be present. It helped me the last few years in the classroom and  dealing with the adults I worked with including those above me in the non-existent hierarchy in Parkland School Division

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 29, 2014 6:52 PM

Interesting what happens when you free yourself from worry — practice brings liberation!

The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 30, 2014 10:38 PM

If only the people who worry about their liabilities would think about the riches they do possess, they would stop worrying.
—Dale Carnegie


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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Building Effective Relationships With Students
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Emotional Intelligence - 3 Great Traits of Insanely Loving People

Emotional Intelligence - 3 Great Traits of Insanely Loving People | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence begins and ends with kindness. Let's examine three characteristics we need to love and how doing conscious acts of kindness can help. (Love the Post!

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

People who are high on emotional intelligence would be people who serve, are present, and are mindful.

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EMPATHY: All About Empathy: A portal for information: articles, definitions, links, videos, etc. about Empathy and Compassion

EMPATHY: All About Empathy: A portal for information: articles, definitions, links, videos, etc. about Empathy and Compassion | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
All About Empathy: A portal for information, resources, articles, definitions, videos, etc. about Empathy and Compassion

Via Jose Baldaia
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting idea.
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How to Show Empathy

Listen. Listening is one of the most effective ways you can demonstrate empathy to other people. When you are practicing active listening, you are listening with purpose.[1] You aren't fiddling about on your phone, or thinking about what you're going to make for dinner tonight, you're really taking in what the other person is saying.


If you're listening to someone and you get distracted by thinking about dinner or whatever it is you want to say next in the conversation, bring yourself back to the present by saying "I was just thinking about ___(last thing you remember them saying)__ and I was wondering if you could repeat what you just said so that I don't miss anything."


Look the speaker in the eye (don't stare, but try to maintain eye contact), and sit facing the person. Don't let your gaze drift all over the place, because it will look as though you aren't paying attention and that you don't care what this person has to say.
Active listening requires three things.[2] First, paraphrase what the person said to show that you understood the content.

 


Via Edwin Rutsch, june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article is indepth. It focuses on being attentive, being present, and being mindful to the other person. It also speaks about imagining what it might be like to be in the other person's situation.

Teachers can play a role by modeling these skills.
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Teaching Empathy with Concrete Examples

Teaching Empathy with Concrete Examples | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Harvard Graduate School of Education’s “Making Caring Common” project suggests five ways to help kids demonstrate more empathy or kindness. They include using read alouds, exploring world geography, having a kindness competition, sit with someone new at lunch, and participating in community service.

Read alouds are one of my favorite ways to make issues relatable for my students. ReadBrightly is a great place to find ideas, including a list of picture books to help kids understand the refugee experience. But we must work to make empathy concrete beyond stories.

For starters, we must model empathy as we would any other skill. If you don’t listen to your students and use empathy as part of your classroom management, how likely are your students to show empathy to others?

Via Edwin Rutsch, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Maria Margarida Correia, malek
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Forming empathy is challenging. Concrete examples make sense. Another approach might be to use literature and create dialogue about the literature. How does servant-leadership fit?
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The Difference Between Empathy and Sympathy Explained Perfectly With a Simple Animation - The Power of Ideas

The Difference Between Empathy and Sympathy Explained Perfectly With a Simple Animation - The Power of Ideas | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
This is a beautiful video from Dr. Brene Brown that explains the difference between empathy and sympathy and which one really leads to a genuine connection. Enjoy!   Continue the conversation Our parent site, Ideapod, is a social network for idea sharing. It’s a place for you to explore ideas, share your own and come …

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are a couple of animated videos based on Brenee Brown's work.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy

Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

If your boss is a jerk, there might be a scientific reason for it. A new study suggests feeling powerful dampens the part of the brain that helps us connect with others.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Lynnette Van Dyke, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is not just powerful people. Even middle management don't get it.

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Verica Markovic's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:17 AM

Etude intéressante, mais à nuancer.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:52 PM

Not surprising but still needs more exploration by authentic leaders, the key is that one can overpower the tendency to quelsh empathy in their roles. But it is not easy nor is it often truly understood.

Chris Brown's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:05 PM

"Whether you're with a team at work [or] your family dinner, all of that hinges on how we adapt our behaviors to the behaviors of other people, and power takes a bite out of that ability, which is too bad."

 

A powerful statement.  How can we keep focused on connecting to others so we don't become less empathetic?