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Rescooped by Ilene Wasserman from Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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A Sense of Purpose Means a Longer Life

A Sense of Purpose Means a Longer Life | Leadership and diversity | Scoop.it
in a study published just this month, researchers at University College London found that, for people over the age of 65, a sense of purpose and overall well-being meant that they were 30% less likely to die over a period of eight and a half years.

Via David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
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David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's curator insight, March 18, 5:41 PM
‘Do you have a strong sense of purpose, meaning, and passion for  a better world in your life?’ If you answer yes to this question, then you may have a 15% higher chance of still being alive in the 2028. That sounds crazy, but indeed it’s based on longitudinal research – in 2000, more than 6000 people were asked this and similar questions. In Man's Search for Meaning Victor Frankl demonstrated how sense of meaning is absolutely life promoting.  Frankl, as we all know, was in a concentration camp where everything was taken from him and others, and yet he saw resources, relationships, and regenerative possibilities that gave life to many, and built a whole new edifice and field of transformational capacity in psychology. There are examples after examples of Frankl's idea of finding the life-promoting meaning in the midst of extreme suffering; they are threaded throughout his accounts in the harsh conditions of the Nazi concentration camps. In his 1959 book--"Saying Yes to Life in Spite of Everything: A Psychologist Experience the Concentration Camp" he said, "What is to give light must endure burning."  What's important about the London study cited in this article is that we are heading into an era that's been called The Purpose Economy (see Aaron Hurst's book)--and I have seen how people flourish, and companies prosper, when the sense of real purpose is ablaze. For example I  interviewed an associate at the Tesla display store in Amsterdam. The young person was alive. He was responsive. He was as bright about the technical questions I asked as anyone at "the shop floor level" I have ever seen. I wondered why. I asked him:"can you tell me--what's your job here at Tesla?" He did not hesitate a moment: "My job is to electrify the renewable energy age" he said. But, I said, what is it that you do here at Tesla in this display center? He said "I told you--my job, and i feel so privileged, is to electrify the renewable energy age!"  Then i tried a different angle. I still wanted to understand his job. This time I wanted to make it simple. So I asked "When you tell your mother what you do in your job, what do you tell her about your work?" He said it again: "Just as I've shared with you I have shared it with my mother, that is, my job is to electrify the renewable energy age, and Tesla might well be the best company in the world today to help me help get this task of historic magnitude actually done." Wow. And with this sense of Purpose and meaning, not only is everyday at work a special mission, but we can bet that with this kind of flourishing this young person will actually boost his odds of being healthier and live longer that those working without a sense of life-giving purpose. We call this dynamic "mirror flourishing"--whereupon by a company and its people doing good to help the world to flourish "out there" guess who also really flourishes? Yes "the out there" becomes "the in here" and this dynamic is predictable--yes it's no accident that the young Tesla missionary was so impressive at work-- and this health enabling dynamic is demonstrated over and over at this storytelling site called www.aim2flourish.com.   
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, March 19, 9:27 AM
Just like happiness, leading a meaningful life is also associated with a longer life!
Ziggi Ivan Santini's comment, March 20, 5:23 AM
These news are from 2014, so obviously not "published just this month"
Rescooped by Ilene Wasserman from Mentoring for Leadership Development
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Effective Leaders Know What, When and How to Delegate » Leadership Development Services, LLC

Effective Leaders Know What, When and How to Delegate » Leadership Development Services, LLC | Leadership and diversity | Scoop.it

Via Lois Zachary
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Rescooped by Ilene Wasserman from LeadershipABC
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A Simple Formula for Changing Our Behavior

A Simple Formula for Changing Our Behavior | Leadership and diversity | Scoop.it

Changing behavior doesn’t come naturally. If we want to learn, we need to tolerate the feeling of inauthenticity long enough to integrate the new way of being. Long enough for the new way of being to feel natural.




Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ilene Wasserman's insight:

Changing patterns of behavior require both intention, focused experimentation and support from others.  This article supports the work of becoming a deliberately developmental organization.  Gaining the support of people you work with and live with is essential.


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Michelle Belan's curator insight, October 16, 2015 9:30 AM

Changing our behavior is hard because no matter what our brains tell us we SHOULD do, our emotions get in the way. We have to learn to push past the emotional comfort we get by doing what we always do, and move into a less comfortable, less authentic place for a while. Fake it 'til you make it, as it were.

Martin Silcock's curator insight, October 18, 2015 2:15 PM

"If we want to learn, we need to tolerate the feeling of inauthenticity long enough to integrate the new way of being. Long enough for the new way of being to feel natural"

 

And to help learn a new behavioural response follow these steps

 

Identify the problemState what needs to happenOffer to help

 

It may feel inauthentic at ffirst...and that is learning

Larry Sandoval's curator insight, December 26, 2015 6:40 PM

Behavior is everything