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10 reasons Finland's school system is better 

10 reasons Finland's school system is better  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

Many people are familiar with the stereotype of the hard-working, rote memorization, myopic tunnel vision of Eastern Asian study and work ethics. Many of these countries, like China, Singapore, and Japan amongst others routinely rank in the number one spots in both math and science.

Some pundits point towards this model of exhaustive brain draining as something Americans should aspire to become. Work more! Study harder! Live less. The facts and figures don’t lie – these countries are outperforming us, but there might be a better and healthier way to go about this.

Finland is the answer – a country rich in intellectual and educational reform has initiated over the years a number of novel and simple changes that have completely revolutionized their educational system. They outrank the United States and are gaining on Eastern Asian countries.

Are they cramming in dimly-lit rooms on robotic schedules?  Nope. Stressing over standardized tests enacted by the government? No way. Finland is leading the way because of common-sense practices and a holistic teaching environment that strives for equity over excellence. Here are 10 reasons why Finland’s education system is dominating America and the world stage


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David Hain's curator insight, September 11, 5:59 AM

This article on the future of education is written from an American perspective - but it could just as easily be the UK that is the laggard when compared to Finland.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in the Workplace
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How to Boost Your Empathy Factor at Work with author, Marie Miyashiro  

How to Boost Your Empathy Factor at Work with author, Marie Miyashiro   | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Marie Miyashiro is an author, keynote speaker and trainer/consultant, specialised in bringing empathy into the workplace.

 

Her book, The Empathy Factor – Your Competitive Advantage for Personal, Team, and Business Success, has been translated into four languages. In this conversation, we talk about why empathy is so important, the ways to bring empathy into the workplace, which companies and industries are getting onboard with her vision and much more.

 

 


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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Complex systems and projects
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Why Economists Can't Understand Complex Systems: Not Even the Nobel Prize, William Nordhaus

Why Economists Can't Understand Complex Systems: Not Even the Nobel Prize, William Nordhaus | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

Nordhaus' approach to climate change mitigation highlights a general problem with how economists tend to tackle complex systems: their training makes them tend to see changes as smooth and gradual. But real-world systems, normally, do what they damn please, including crashing down in what we call the Seneca Effect.


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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, October 16, 11:20 AM

Do read, do figure out by yourself. Limits to Thinking...

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The Mental Habits of Effective Leaders: My Interview with Jennifer Garvey Berger

The Mental Habits of Effective Leaders: My Interview with Jennifer Garvey Berger | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
In this fast-paced digital economy, it’s impossible to see the changes that are on the horizon. That makes it difficult for leaders to prepare for what’s ahead. In her best-selling books, Changing on the Job, and Simple Habits for Complex Times, author and developmental coach Jennifer Garvey Berger teaches the skills and habits you can adopt today to make you more agile and adaptable to any scenario.

During our discussion, we explore some of the methods Jennifer uses to help individuals become better listeners, better learners, and better leaders. There was so much wisdom in this interview that it was difficult to decide what excerpts to share.

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David Hain's curator insight, October 24, 5:38 AM

There is a lot of leadership wisdom in this podcast from the always excellent Farnam Street blog site.

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4 Movies Scenes You Should Watch to Be a Better Manager

4 Movies Scenes You Should Watch to Be a Better Manager | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Inspiration to be a better manager can come from anywhere, including movies. Watch these 4 movie scenes to be a better manager.

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Kill Your Performance Ratings

Kill Your Performance Ratings | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Evidence is mounting that conventional approaches to strategic human capital management are broken. This is particularly true for performance management (PM) systems—the appraisal approaches in which employees (working with their managers) set goals for the year; managers interview others who have worked with them and write up an appraisal; employees are rated and ranked numerically; and salary, bonus, and promotion opportunities are awarded accordingly. A 2013 survey by the Society for Human Resource Management asked HR professionals about the quality of their own PM systems; only 23 percent said their company was above average in the way it conducted them. Other studies uncovered even more disdain. According to the Corporate Executive Board (CEB), a management research group, surveys have found that 95 percent of managers are dissatisfied with their PM systems, and 90 percent of HR heads believe they do not yield accurate information.

The performance management systems in many companies are misleading, cumbersome, and complex, requiring some HR departments to put aside an entire quarter to manage them. More important, they can be counterproductive. In the context of neuroscience research, most PM practices turn out to damage the performance they are intended to improve. That’s because they are based on a fundamental misunderstanding of human responses, as revealed in recurring patterns of mental activity.

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David Hain's curator insight, November 6, 3:41 AM

Want to make a huge difference to motivation in your organisation and bring a growth mindset to the staff? Zap the performance ranking system and replace with regular learning conversations! There are many reasons why, eloquently explained here.

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Super Empaths Are Real, Says Study - VICE

Super Empaths Are Real, Says Study - VICE | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
New research has suggested that 1 to 2 percent of the population struggle to differentiate between their own bodily feelings and other people's.

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Adam Grant: The surprising habits of original thinkers | TED Talk

Adam Grant: The surprising habits of original thinkers | TED Talk | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals -- including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones."

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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in the Workplace
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Google Spent Years Studying Successful Teams. Here's the 1 Thing That Mattered Most

Google Spent Years Studying Successful Teams. Here's the 1 Thing That Mattered Most | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

how do you build bridges of trust?
Here's a sample of nine habits and behaviors you can practice to build trust between yourself and others:

1. Listen carefully. 
Listening has become a lost art. Many fall into the trap of simply "taking turns" speaking; as one person speaks, the other is already thinking about what they're going to say next--without truly listening to the other person's thoughts, ideas, and feelings. 

Remember that listening is about learning. When others speak, resist the urge to judge, to interrupt and share your experience, or to try and solve a problem. Instead, strive to understand. 

2. Show empathy. 
Empathy is made up of three parts: cognitive, emotional, and compassionate.

Through careful listening (see point 1 above), you can understand how another person thinks and feels.

The next step is the most difficult: emotional empathy, or the ability to share another person's feelings. To do this, ask yourself: When have I felt similar to what this person has described? How can I relate to that feeling?

For example, if someone is struggling, don't think to yourself: "Well, I've had to struggle before, too. They just need to toughen up!" Instead, think of a time when you severely struggled, to the point you couldn't accomplish what you wanted. This helps you relate to the other person.

Now you're ready to show compassionate empathy--by taking action to help however you can. 


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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Psychogenyx News Feed
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What Personality Tests Really Deliver

What Personality Tests Really Deliver | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Louis Menand on the two-billion-dollar industry surrounding Myers-Briggs tests, and whether they are more self-help than science.

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The 4 Tasks You Need to Do to Create the Perfect End to Your Workday

The 4 Tasks You Need to Do to Create the Perfect End to Your Workday | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
If you're having trouble disconnecting from work at night, try these steps to 'SHUT' down your day.

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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in the Workplace
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Leaders practice empathy - Empathy is the most important instrument in a leader’s toolbox.

Empathy is the most important instrument in a leader’s toolbox.


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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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The 5 Pernicious Patterns Most Leaders Cannot See —

The 5 Pernicious Patterns Most Leaders Cannot See — | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The hidden forces that sap our ability to innovate & change.

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Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better

Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Starting 15 years ago, scientists have been studying the complex and mysterious emotion called awe—one you might have felt if you’ve stood in front of the Taj Mahal, hiked among towering redwoods, or had your mind blown at a concert, play, or ballet.

Inducing goosebumps and dropped jaws, awe experiences are remarkable in their own right. Moreover, a growing body of research suggests that experiencing awe may lead to a wide range of benefits, from happiness and health to perhaps more unexpected benefits such as generosity, humility, and critical thinking.

In our busy lives, seeking awe may be low on our list of priorities. But we might be underestimating its power. “One simple prescription can have transformative effects: Look for more daily experiences of awe,” writes the GGSC’s Dacher Keltner.

The latest research suggests that taking the time to experience awe—whether through engaging with nature, enjoying great art or music, or even bingeing on breathtaking YouTube videos—may be a pathway to improving your life and relationships.

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David Hain's curator insight, September 27, 6:30 AM

We all need a bit of awe in our lives - science explores the benefits.

Tom Wojick's curator insight, September 27, 12:46 PM

What a high AWE is! 

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Why a human-centric culture matters to a finance career A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others,

Why a human-centric culture matters to a finance career A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others, | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

What is a human-centric culture?
A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others, such as employees concerned about workloads and customers needing their product delivered on time, while fulfilling the financial team’s role to maintain profitability.

Citera says it involves the personal touch: “You don’t operate from your desk and shoot emails. You have to be face to face. You have to have a seat at the table. It’s about becoming a true business partner.”

He says the human-centric finance team must participate in conversations around the organisation, enabling team members to direct, guide and highlight issues.


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What is holacracy? The management approach tested by Google and Zappos.

What is holacracy? The management approach tested by Google and Zappos. | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Ultimately, the greatest value of holacracy may be the idea of holacracy itself. It may not work for every company, but its premise is revolutionary. In essence, it asks for more soulfulness at work—for all of us, no matter our job title, to show up with more intentionality every day. It asks for us to engage with the terrifying act of transcending our egos.

“Look at the stuff that gets in the way of humans connecting fully as humans,” says Robertson. “It’s the politics, bureaucracy—instead of us being vulnerable, authentic creatures that fail. Let’s get a lot of that out of the way.”

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David Hain's curator insight, October 17, 5:12 AM

Interesting article about the history and practice of holacracy. It probably isn't the future of work - much to complex for most organisations. But it points us firmly in the direction of a more human workplace where people at all levels act on their responsibilities in an atmosphere of common purpose. David Marquet's "Turn the Ship Around" never once mentions holacracy - but it does offfer a compelling story about a method of developing leaders at ever level.

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Why Managers Are Central to an Agile Culture

Why Managers Are Central to an Agile Culture | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

There's growing awareness that organizations need to be far more agile.

Only half of employees globally clearly know what's expected of them at work -- it's hard to respond quickly and nimbly when you're not sure what your responsibilities are.

And most employees are unclear about what their organization stands for, while fewer believe strongly in their organization's values.

There's a reason leaders cite "culture" as an important priority.

Agility, if it exists in an organization at all, is dictated by culture.


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David Hain's curator insight, October 24, 5:54 AM

Gallup on how mind set work, much more than tools,  is critical to being able to become agile.

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5 Daily Habits to Steal From LeBron James, Including His Powerful Anti-Stress Ritual

5 Daily Habits to Steal From LeBron James, Including His Powerful Anti-Stress Ritual | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers and household name, LeBron James doesn’t just shoot and score… he does it on repeat. For more than a decade, LeBron has experienced monumental success.

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Lets kill leadership

Lets kill leadership | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
In his novel Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, Haruki Murakami introduces a character called Aka. He is an aspiring educator, someone training company employees. Aka declares the following:

“One thing I learned from working in a company was that the majority of people in the world have no problem following orders. They’re actually happy to be told what to do. They might complain, but that’s how they really feel. They just grumble out of habit. If you told them to think for themselves, and make their own decisions and take responsibility for them, they’d be clueless.”

Tsukuru, Aka’s colleague, is appalled by the cynicism of his friend’s view of humanity.

But maybe – just maybe – Aka is right. Perhaps most people really do want simply to follow orders; they don’t want to think for themselves. And if Aka’s view of the world is correct, what are the implications?

In a wealthy society replete with opportunity, perhaps there are few sadder sights than a well-educated 50-year-old still in employment, still reporting to a boss, still working a five-day week, still fearful of stepping out of line and still dependent on the beneficence of others.

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David Hain's curator insight, November 7, 2:34 PM

Too much leadership and hierarchy breeds too much followership? Impacts on degree of initiative, self-determination and accountability.

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We don’t need better leaders

We don’t need better leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

“Why is everyone so hung up on Leaders, Leadership and Leadership courses – it’s what gets us into a mess. Think banking, politics, sport…” —Donald Clark

If all you have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail. If all you know is hierarchical leadership by virtue of one’s position, then all solutions are in the hands of the CEO. Conversations with 150 CEO’s only yield ‘CEO thinking’.

To raise the organization’s confidence in their decisions, leaders must carefully balance the various personal paradoxes involved in the decision-making process, including:

doubt – anxiety versus fearlessness, omniscience versus ignorance;
conviction – openness versus self-sufficiency, hubris versus humility;
realism – realistic optimism, i.e., pragmatism, versus blind optimism, i.e., gambling; and
patience – the right pacing or timing of decisions versus detrimental haste and hesitation.”

The great man theory of leadership is outdated, just as the divine right of kings was two centuries ago. Even the World Economic Forum thinks in terms of leadership as an individual achievement


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David Hain's curator insight, July 19, 5:43 AM

Uncommon sense about leadership in the network age from @HJarche!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 12:28 PM

While I agree with this in principle I still come back to my definition that everyone is a leader at some level so leadership mentality is still required.  However toxic and selfish leadership does need to be abolished in favor of open, transparent, compassionate, and trustworthy leadership. Adaptable leaders will, if they are smart, build & empower matrixed organizations.

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Why Denmark dominates the World Happiness Report rankings year after year

Why Denmark dominates the World Happiness Report rankings year after year | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Their culture places a high value on something many Americans don't.

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Caring Leaders, Better Results

Caring Leaders, Better Results | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
A leader’s concern for others all too often gets sidelined in today’s high-pressure business world. Many leaders assume high pressure yields high productivity, when in fact the opposite is true. Emotionally intelligent leaders who cultivate a positive culture increase engagement and productivity while reducing turnover and health problems among employees.

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David Hain's curator insight, September 6, 8:06 AM

Daniel Goleman on why caring matters - or maybe why the right kind of caring matters...

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State of the Heart 2018: The Latest Research on Emotional Intelligence •

State of the Heart 2018: The Latest Research on Emotional Intelligence • | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The State of the Heart provides new data on emotional intelligence from over 200,000 people in 160 countries, revealing important trends for global EQ and wellbeing.
Tracking global trends in emotional intelligence for over a decade, the State of the Heart is the world’s most extensive research on emotional intelligence strengths, challenges & opportunities. The 2018 findings reveal powerful insights on the shifting capabilities to make a better future. 

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David Hain's curator insight, September 7, 7:04 AM

Find out what's happening  in terms of global trends in emotional intelligence here.

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The New Leadership Paradigm

The New Leadership Paradigm | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
We owe much of Berrett-Koehler’s success to “eating our own cooking”—putting the ideas espoused by these and other books we have published into practice in our own company.

In my chart The New Leadership Paradigm I lay out ten dimensions of the old command-and-control leadership paradigm and ten corresponding dimensions of  the new paradigm, which might be called “shared leadership,” “servant leadership,” or “collaborative leadership.”

These ten dimensions were drawn from concepts in BK books. But they also reflect experiences I have had over the years—both those described above and many other experiences interacting with numerous organizations.

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David Hain's curator insight, September 12, 6:19 AM

Berrett-Koehler is one of the very best publishers of personal and organisational growth books. Partly because they try to walk their talk. Here's why. Includes access to useful download that can help to start a great discussion about how things get done.

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How the psychology of the England football team could change your life 

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The era of hard-talking, tyrannical managers is over – both on and off the pitch. “Football, which I love and work in, is really bad at talking,” says Caulfield. “It does instructing and telling off but it doesn’t do talking and listening and empathy that well. It sounds a bit fluffy but that’s the world in which we now live, and the world in which these players have grown up.” Southgate, he says, realised early in his coaching career that instilling fear wasn’t going to work. “We all need a telling-off now and then – and he’s good at that, by the way – but you’ll get far more from putting your faith in people than you will anything else. People had this lazy opinion that he’s too ‘nice’ and they see kindness as weakness, but it’s the most unbelievable strength if you use it in the right way.”

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David Hain's curator insight, July 12, 8:53 AM

I know they lost last night in the semi-final, but this article still resonates, and the contents (reframing, learning from failure, etc) will help them go further in future. Positive psychology really works, and tomorrow's leaders need to get on board with it - because the England football team is in effect an analog for every team that wants to deliver collective success and well being!

Tom Wojick's curator insight, July 12, 11:02 AM

A great example of a coach/leader utilizing Relationship - Centered Leadership: Presence (EQ), Resiliency, Trustworthiness, Moral Courage, Purpose, Authenticity