Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien
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Just how big a deal was the sale of The Nines Hotel in Portland? - Portland Business Journal

Just how big a deal was the sale of The Nines Hotel in Portland? - Portland Business Journal | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
One of Portland's swanky hotels ended up high on a list of recent resort transactions.

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Just how big a deal was the sale of The Nines Hotel in Portland? - Portland Business Journal

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Common Social Media Mistakes | Top Seo Blog

Common Social Media Mistakes | Top Seo Blog | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Common Social Media Mistakes

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Saïd Bouteflika Les banderilles de Hichem Aboud - El Watan

Saïd Bouteflika Les banderilles de Hichem Aboud - El Watan | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
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Saïd Bouteflika Les banderilles de Hichem Aboud
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Le journaliste et écrivain Hichem Aboud accuse le frère cadet du président Bouteflika d'être responsable de la corruption à grande échelle que connaît l'Algérie.

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Algérie: «C'est Saïd Bouteflika qui gère le pays et tout le monde est ...

Algérie: «C'est Saïd Bouteflika qui gère le pays et tout le monde est ... | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Les scandales continuent d'ébranler la scène politique algérienne et le sommet de l'Etat à deux mois de l'élection présidentielle. Cette fois-ci, c'est un général à la retraite, le fameux généra...

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ALGERIE : Autorisez les organisations de défense des droits de l ...

ALGERIE : Autorisez les organisations de défense des droits de l ... | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Mardi, 11 février 2014 - L'Algérie doit se conformer aux valeurs du Conseil des droits de l'Homme des Nations unies et permettre aux experts de l'ONU et aux organisations non gouvernementales de défense des droits de ...
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Dyman Associates Management The political science of cybersecurity V: Why running hackers through the FBI really isn’t a good idea

Dyman Associates Management The political science of cybersecurity V: Why running hackers through the FBI really isn’t a good idea | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it

One of the big problems of cybersecurity is that states can use private actors as secret proxies to carry out cyber-attacks. When the FBI runs hackers organizing international attacks, other states are likely to view this very dubiously indeed.


Via Valerio Anema
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Valerio Anema's curator insight, May 2, 2014 10:38 PM

(Washingtonpost: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/04/25/the-political-science-of-cybersecurity-v-why-running-hackers-through-the-fbi-really-isnt-a-good-idea/) - One of the most difficult challenges of cybersecurity (see: http://dymanassociatesprojects.com/) is that it enables private actors to play a significant role in international security (see: http://www.pinterest.com/valerioanema/dyman-associates-projects/). Both security officials and international relations scholars tend to assume that states are the most important security actors. With a couple of minor exceptions (mercenary forces and the like) private actors simply don’t have the firepower to play a substantial role. Even terrorist groups with international ambitions usually require some kind of state to provide them with safe haven or to back them. Many (although certainly not all) experts argue that cybersecurity is different. Computers and Internet access are all that you need to carry out many kinds of attack, allowing private actors to become a real force in international cyber politics (see: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Dyman-Associates-Projects-7415482).

 

 

This potentially presents two problems for traditional understandings of international security. First, many argue that the world will be less stable if private actors can affect international security. For example, Joseph Nye, a prominent scholar and former policymaker, argues (PDF) that states have not been displaced by private actors in cybersecurity, but now have to share the stage with them. This creates greater volatility in world politics. The more actors there are, the greater the chance of unpredictable accidents, events, attacks or misunderstandings. Furthermore, private actors may have widely varying motivations and be more difficult to discipline. They are less likely to be concerned with the stability of the international system than states are.

 

 

There is also a more subtle problem. The existence of empowered private actors in cybersecurity presents temptations to states. It is easier for states to attack other states while blaming hackers, rogue elements or others for the attacks, thus making retaliation less likely. In cyberspace, it is often hard to figure out who precisely is responsible for an attack. These problems are multiplied when states can e.g. use clandestine relationships with private actors to carry out attacks by proxy.

 

 

For example, there is still vigorous debate over whether or not the Russian state mounted cyber attacks on Georgia during a dispute a few years ago. Certainly, the major attacks appear to have been mounted from within Russia. However, Ron Deibert, Rahal Rohozinski and Masashi Crete-Nishihata argue (paywalled) that the likely perpetrators were patriotic Russian cyber criminals (who had already created “botnets” of compromised computers for purely criminal attacks) rather than the Russian state itself. While it is possible that the Russian state (some elements of which maintain clandestine contact with the Russian underworld) was using these criminal networks as a cutout to blur responsibility, it is nearly impossible to prove one way or another.

 

 

This has led some experts to call for new norms about responsibility. Jason Healey of the Atlantic Council proposes a sliding scale under which states would effectively be required to take responsibility for any major attacks organized from their territory or carried out by their citizens. This would change the incentives, so that states would both be less inclined to cheat by acting through hidden proxies, and more inclined to tidy up rogue elements on their territory that might mount international attacks and land them in hot water. They suggest that the best way for the U.S. to protect its national security interest is to push for such norms.

 

 

In this context, yesterday’s New York Times story about the relationship between the FBI and the loosely-knit hacker culture/collective Anonymous raises some problems. The FBI identified a key Anonymous member, Sabu, and turned him so as to identify other hackers. Sabu then appears to have shared a list of foreign Web sites (including sites run by the governments of Iran, Syria, Poland, Turkey, Brazil and Pakistan) with vulnerabilities, and encouraged his colleagues to try to hack into them, uploading data to a server monitored by the FBI.

 

 

The Times says it is unclear whether he was doing so on direct orders from his FBI handlers. It is also unclear what happened to the information after it was uploaded (the Times raises the possibility that it was shared with other intelligence agencies, but it may have been left there to sit as evidence). Either way, this report is sure to be interpreted by other countries (including U.S. allies like Poland and Turkey) as strong circumstantial evidence that the U.S. has used independent hackers to conduct attacks in the past, and very possibly is doing so at present.

 

 

This obviously makes it harder for the U.S. to push for the kinds of norms that Healey and others advocate. If the U.S. appears to have dirty hands, it will have a more difficult time getting other states to believe in the purity of its actions and intentions. U.S. allies will be disinclined to believe its protestations. Countries that are more or less hostile to the U.S., and which have dubious relations with their own hacking community (such as Russia), are sure to point to the FBI’s decision to run Sabu as evidence of U.S. hypocrisy if the U.S. tries to get them to take responsibility for attacks mounted from their soil.

 

 

This will also have consequences if and when U.S. hackers (who are smart, talented and sometimes politically motivated) mount a successful public attack on a target in a third country. The U.S. administration will likely come under sustained suspicion as the hidden culprit behind such an attack, even if it has had absolutely nothing to do with it. Apparent past history will guide other states’ judgment (especially if these other states themselves have clandestine but systematic relationships with hackers, and assume that countries do the same). It’s doubtful that these issues of international policy were foremost in the thoughts of FBI officials when they decided to run Sabu (the FBI is a domestically focused agency, primarily concerned with criminal enforcement). Even so, their decisions may turn out to have important, and likely unfortunate, international ramifications.

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URGENT. Les grévistes de Lafarge évacués de force par la police

URGENT. Les grévistes de Lafarge évacués de force par la police | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Les grévistes de la faim qui se sont installés devant le siège de leur entreprise Lafarge ont été évacués de...
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Routine traffic stop results in numerous drug charges:

https://twitter.com/BostonInfoBuzz/status/461978450262118400/


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HDC 2014

Hotel data enthusiasts converged on Nashville, Tennessee, for the 6th annual Hotel Data Conference, hosted by STR and Hotel News Now. Here are the highlights.

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Les citoyens revendiquent des logements ruraux - Liberté-Algérie

Les citoyens revendiquent des logements ruraux - Liberté-Algérie | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Les citoyens revendiquent des logements ruraux Liberté-Algérie La citation de la marque liberte-algerie.com sur un site Internet tiers ne signifie pas que liberte-algerie.com assume une quelconque garantie et responsabilité quant au contenu du site...

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Essais nucléaires de Reggane : les mensonges de la France Des documents ultra-secrets révélés par le journal “le parisien” - Liberté Algérie , Quotidien national d'information

Essais nucléaires de Reggane : les mensonges de la France Des documents ultra-secrets révélés par le journal “le parisien” - Liberté Algérie , Quotidien national d'information | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
Contrairement à la version mise en avant par les autorités françaises de l’époque, les effets radioactifs se sont propagés à tout (RT @cmounir1964: Essais nucléaires de Reggane #Algerie : les mensonges de la France

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LES PRATICIENS DE SANTE, DONNEZ VOTRE AVIS !!!!

LES PRATICIENS DE SANTE, DONNEZ VOTRE AVIS !!!! | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
site info,news snpsp1 ,surtout politique,fakakirs
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Officiel : Nabil Bentaleb jouera pour l'Algérie - 123AlgeriaSport.com

Le président de la FAF Raouraoua a rencontré aujourd'hui le joueur de Tottenham et lui a remis l'engagement réglementaire qui atteste de sa volonté de jouer pour les couleurs de l'Algérie pays de ses parents.
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LE QUOTIDIEN D'ALGERIE » Une urgente seconde République et un légitime pouvoir de salut public !

LE QUOTIDIEN D'ALGERIE » Une urgente seconde République et un légitime pouvoir de salut public ! | Le rapport qui interpelle BP et le Royaume-Uni sur des accords avec le régime algérien | Scoop.it
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Post #1: Boston Marathon Explosions: Terror at the Finish Line - YouTube

At least three people were killed and 130 wounded in two bomb blasts during the race. *More: http://abcn.ws/boston_2013

Via Jacqui Specogna
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Jacqui Specogna's curator insight, April 13, 2014 9:40 AM

I chose this ABC News broadcast posted on YouTube as my first source in my curation project. This is one of the first, extensive and completely detailed reports published on the day of the Boston Marathon Bombings.  This news report was broadcast the night of the attacks, after the marathon had ended.   At this point, 140 participants have been reported as injured and 3 at least, are dead, including an 8-year-old boy.  This news broadcast goes on to show live video footage of the actual bombs exploding and the chaos that ensued shortly after by the masses.  Please watch with caution as video footage can be graphic and upsetting to many people. Included in this report are voice-overs and interviews with participants of the marathon who were around at the times the bombs went off.   ABC interviews Dr. William Mackey of Tufts Medical Centre, who explains what type of injuries the ER was seeing in the minutes after the bombs went off.  A clip from President Obama is also inserted in the broadcast, as he speaks in a press conference that day, reassuring US citizens that the FBI and  US Government will get to the bottom of finding out who as responsible for the attacks.  An interview conducted with New York Rep Peter King is also presented, which shows King having no hesitation in saying he thinks it could be an al- Quaeda related attack.  Bruce Mendelsohn, first responder and 'hero' in ABC News’ eyes also tells his side of the story - from being on seen and helping victims in the shocking and panic-stricken moments after the bombs went off.  Raw photos, live footage, interviews with marathoners and clips from congress all make this story a detailed and well-written report.   ABC is presented as having a credible voice.