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Do digital tools improve reading outcomes?

Do digital tools improve reading outcomes? | Education | Scoop.it

"With the recent advancement of technology, it changes the tools children use to learn. When it comes to reading, there are many different apps and programs that can be used to keep children engaged and help them practice reading skills. Technology used as a tool for reading instruction can supplement the skills being taught, engage students more, and allows them to take charge of their own learning."


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Designing Engaging Assignments by Beth Pandolpho

Designing Engaging Assignments by Beth Pandolpho | Education | Scoop.it
By Beth Pandolpho

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Brise-glace A2 : "le plan de table"

Brise-glace A2 : "le plan de table" | Education | Scoop.it
Comment débuter une formation ? Découvrez cette activité brise-glace courte et communicative, idéale pour mettre à l'aise les apprenants.

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10 Tips For Effective Problem-Based Learning: The Ultimate Instructional Solution

10 Tips For Effective Problem-Based Learning: The Ultimate Instructional Solution | Education | Scoop.it
Problem-based learning (PBL) was first introduced to the field of education in the 1960s by medical education specialist Howard Barrows, who argued that

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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 16, 2015 6:13 PM

Always wondered… Thx Beth Dichter

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:51 AM

When you read or hear the words PBL do you think Problem-Based Learning or Project-Based Learning? This post discusses problem-based learning, and provides a historical background before discussing defining it. .The post then compares problem-based learning with project-based, inquiry-based and case-based learning before moving on to provide ten recommendations. Three are below.

* Clearly define your purpose for doing problem-based learning

* Develop ill-structured problems

* Emphasize depth over breadth

To learn more about these three recommendations and view the other seven click through to the post. You may find that problem-based learning is already being used do some degree with your learners, and this post may provide some ideas on how to move into this direction more efficiently.

Katie Catania's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:16 AM

When you read or hear the words PBL do you think Problem-Based Learning or Project-Based Learning? This post discusses problem-based learning, and provides a historical background before discussing defining it. .The post then compares problem-based learning with project-based, inquiry-based and case-based learning before moving on to provide ten recommendations. Three are below.

* Clearly define your purpose for doing problem-based learning

* Develop ill-structured problems

* Emphasize depth over breadth

To learn more about these three recommendations and view the other seven click through to the post. You may find that problem-based learning is already being used do some degree with your learners, and this post may provide some ideas on how to move into this direction more efficiently.

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Ten Great Tools for Telling Stories With Pictures - A PDF Handout

Ten Great Tools for Telling Stories With Pictures - A PDF Handout | Education | Scoop.it

"Composing a story from scratch comes naturally to some people. For the rest of us creating a story from scratch can be a struggle. Over the years I’ve found that using pictures helps a lot of students get started on crafting stories."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 2, 2015 6:23 AM

If you are looking for some great tools that will provide inspiration for learners to write stories check out this post by Richard Byrne. He provides ten tools that you may find useful.

The first section has two tools that help learners create collages, CanvaPicCollage (Android and iPad app), and  PicMonkey (browser based). He also suggests using ThingLink as a tool for learners to enhance their collage (and links to a tutorial).

The second section looks at "threading images into stories." Thematic allows you to upload images and display up to twenty in a story with one line of text for each image. Storehouse is a free iPad app that allows you to use images and video and arrange them with a line of text above or below the image or video clip. Adobe Slate is a free iPad app that also allows you to create stories and has more features than Storehouse.

The final section looks at creating picture books and suggest My Storybook (web based), Picture Book Maker (web based) and Little Story Creator (free iPad app).

Each of these tools is described in more detail in the post. As this school year draws to a close your class might enjoy using one of these tools to create a story about what they have learned this year.

Monica Lamelas's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:09 AM

If you are looking for some great tools that will provide inspiration for learners to write stories check out this post by Richard Byrne. He provides ten tools that you may find useful.

The first section has two tools that help learners create collages, Canva,  PicCollage (Android and iPad app), and  PicMonkey (browser based). He also suggests using ThingLink as a tool for learners to enhance their collage (and links to a tutorial).

The second section looks at "threading images into stories." Thematic allows you to upload images and display up to twenty in a story with one line of text for each image. Storehouse is a free iPad app that allows you to use images and video and arrange them with a line of text above or below the image or video clip. Adobe Slate is a free iPad app that also allows you to create stories and has more features than Storehouse.

The final section looks at creating picture books and suggest My Storybook (web based), Picture Book Maker (web based) and Little Story Creator (free iPad app).

Each of these tools is described in more detail in the post. As this school year draws to a close your class might enjoy using one of these tools to create a story about what they have learned this year.

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An Update to the Upgraded KWL for the 21st Century

An Update to the Upgraded KWL for the 21st Century | Education | Scoop.it
In 2011, I wrote a blog post, titled Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century. It described how I learned about a new version of the traditional KWL (What do I Know, What do I Want to know and wh...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 12, 2015 11:26 PM

Check out this new version of the KWL chart by Silvia Rosenthal Tomlison. What we once called KWL is now the KWHLAQ.

* K stands for  'What do you KNOW?'

* W stands for 'What do you WANT to know?'

* H stands for 'HOW will you find out?'

* L stands for 'What have your LEARNED?'

* A stands for 'What ACTION will you take?'

* Q stands for 'What further QUESTIONS do you have?'

This new visual also includes suggestions under each category to help students make their "thinking and learning visible." For more information click through to the post.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, June 15, 2015 2:44 PM

This article shares an updated version of KWL (What do I Know, What do I Want to know and what have I Learned). How many use this in their classrooms?

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:49 AM

Check out this new version of the KWL chart by Silvia Rosenthal Tomlison. What we once called KWL is now the KWHLAQ.

* K stands for  'What do you KNOW?'

* W stands for 'What do you WANT to know?'

* H stands for 'HOW will you find out?'

* L stands for 'What have your LEARNED?'

* A stands for 'What ACTION will you take?'

* Q stands for 'What further QUESTIONS do you have?'

This new visual also includes suggestions under each category to help students make their "thinking and learning visible." For more information click through to the post.

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Ed tech can change the world (infographic)

Ed tech can change the world (infographic) | Education | Scoop.it
Educational technology is making a huge impact on how students learn, how teachers teach and how education is done.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 2015 6:10 AM

ISTE has released this new infographic that shares data on how technology in impacting our learners. It is divided into the following categories:

* Technology is changing how how students learn.

* Technology is changing how teachers teach.

* Together we're changing education - one classroom at a time.

Before clicking through to the infographic take a moment to think about how technology is used in your school or classroom. Then check out the infographic and see if these statistics surprise you. There may be some new avenues you would like to explore.

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:50 AM

ISTE has released this new infographic that shares data on how technology in impacting our learners. It is divided into the following categories:

* Technology is changing how how students learn.

* Technology is changing how teachers teach.

* Together we're changing education - one classroom at a time.

Before clicking through to the infographic take a moment to think about how technology is used in your school or classroom. Then check out the infographic and see if these statistics surprise you. There may be some new avenues you would like to explore.

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Top 10 Best Free Math Resources on the Web | Edudemic

Top 10 Best Free Math Resources on the Web | Edudemic | Education | Scoop.it
Math is often thought of as a dry subject, but math lovers have been working to show the more interesting side of math to students in many formats.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 17, 2015 5:43 AM

If you are looking for some websites that provide math resources check out this post from Edudemic. Ten sites are listed with descriptions and they cover math from elementary through high school. The sites are listed below with more information found in the post.

* TEDEd Math Videos

* Yummy Math

* Mathsframe

* PBS Learning Media (a great resource for all subjects!)

* Absurd Math

* Illuminations

* Get the Math

* Multiplication.com

* Johnie's Math Page

* Mathdude Podcast

As an example, here is part of the description for Yummy Math:

"All math teachers have heard the common complaint: “but how will I ever use this in the real world?” Yummy Math is one of a few sites on our list that addresses that question in a way meant to keep students interested.

The site mixes videos, images, and real-world challenges that get students thinking about where math fits into their day-to-day lives. The site divides posts by age group, genre, and the type of math on display."

Mel Riddile's curator insight, June 17, 2015 12:00 PM
Beth Dichter's insight:

If you are looking for some websites that provide math resources check out this post from Edudemic. Ten sites are listed with descriptions and they cover math from elementary through high school. The sites are listed below with more information found in the post.

* TEDEd Math Videos

* Yummy Math

* Mathsframe

* PBS Learning Media (a great resource for all subjects!)

* Absurd Math

* Illuminations

* Get the Math

* Multiplication.com

* Johnie's Math Page

* Mathdude Podcast

As an example, here is part of the description for Yummy Math: 

"All math teachers have heard the common complaint: “but how will I ever use this in the real world?” Yummy Math is one of a few sites on our list that addresses that question in a way meant to keep students interested.

The site mixes videos, images, and real-world challenges that get students thinking about where math fits into their day-to-day lives. The site divides posts by age group, genre, and the type of math on display."

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 27, 10:04 AM
Librarian's Choice-10 Best Free Math Resources
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Tips for Keeping up with Technology Using Twitter


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 8, 2015 5:45 AM

Check out this great visual by Sylvia Duckworth that provides 11 tips on how to use Twitter to help you keep up with the ever changing world of technology! Below are her first three tips.

1. Don't try to keep up with everything. You can't. Nobody can.

2. Use social media to keep up with trends.

3. Grow you PLN and learn from them.

Twitter can be a great tool to use for yourself, or with your students. These 11 tips may help you determine ways to make Twitter more manageable.

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:44 AM

Check out this great visual by Sylvia Duckworth that provides 11 tips on how to use Twitter to help you keep up with the ever changing world of technology! Below are her first three tips.

1. Don't try to keep up with everything. You can't. Nobody can.

2. Use social media to keep up with trends.

3. Grow you PLN and learn from them.

Twitter can be a great tool to use for yourself, or with your students. These 11 tips may help you determine ways to make Twitter more manageable.

Monica Lamelas's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:07 AM

Check out this great visual by Sylvia Duckworth that provides 11 tips on how to use Twitter to help you keep up with the ever changing world of technology! Below are her first three tips.

1. Don't try to keep up with everything. You can't. Nobody can.

2. Use social media to keep up with trends.

3. Grow you PLN and learn from them.

Twitter can be a great tool to use for yourself, or with your students. These 11 tips may help you determine ways to make Twitter more manageable.

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7 Social Media Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Learn Today and Teach Tomorrow

7 Social Media Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Learn Today and Teach Tomorrow | Education | Scoop.it
Students are curating content and impacting the world. Help them make the right choices with these 7 social media strategies.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 29, 2015 10:20 PM

Today our students are online and often are not thinking about what they post, and the long-term impacts of their digital tattoo. In fact, teachers must also think about these same issues. This post looks at seven choices to consider:

* Think before you share (a message that Common Sense Media shares a 'think before you post' in a video for tweens and up that was put out by Flocabulary).

* Never respond in anger

* Understand the long term impact of your social shares

* Ask, "Why am I liking or retweeting this?"

* Avoid confrontation

* Try for the "Warm and Fuzzy" reward

* Change the world

Additional information is available in the post, and consider sharing this information with your students next year.

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Camp Google - Free Online Camp

Camp Google - Free Online Camp | Education | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 9, 2015 2:43 PM

If you are looking for activities for students to do this summer (and you have access to students or can email parents) check out this four week camp that Google is offering for students aged 7 - 10 (although they say all ages are welcome). There is a theme for each week:

* Ocean Week is partnered with National Geographic and campers will "dive in and explore what is down there."

* Space Week is partnered with NASA and they state "Hang out with a NASA astronaut and see how they prepare for future space missions."

* Nature Week will help you "discover how Earth's natural wonders were formed with a National Parks Ranger."

* During Music Week you can "jam out with an artist and learn why music sounds so good."

Activities are found online and the site says it will remain up after camp is over...so if you are on vacation...or want to check this out for activities for next year at school, go over to the site to check it out...and camp begins on July 13th!

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:43 AM

If you are looking for activities for students to do this summer (and you have access to students or can email parents) check out this four week camp that Google is offering for students aged 7 - 10 (although they say all ages are welcome). There is a theme for each week:

* Ocean Week is partnered with National Geographic and campers will "dive in and explore what is down there."

* Space Week is partnered with NASA and they state "Hang out with a NASA astronaut and see how they prepare for future space missions."

* Nature Week will help you "discover how Earth's natural wonders were formed with a National Parks Ranger."

* During Music Week you can "jam out with an artist and learn why music sounds so good."

Activities are found online and the site says it will remain up after camp is over...so if you are on vacation...or want to check this out for activities for next year at school, go over to the site to check it out...and camp begins on July 13th!

Lexie Darrough's curator insight, June 9, 2016 3:27 PM

what student wouldn't want to be part of this camp?!

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Schools Need to Include More Visual-Based Learning

Schools Need to Include More Visual-Based Learning | Education | Scoop.it
When asked what my first language is, I often answer, "visual." I think in images, prefer to be taught through images, and like to express what I know through images. I find it disconcerting that a...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 18, 2015 7:59 AM

In our world today we are surrounded by visuals. Yet we walk into many classrooms and see many written texts that often have few visuals. This post begins with a quote from John Medina, the author of Brain Rules (and a developmental molecular biologist). He states "We are incredible at remembering pictures. Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%. Professionals everywhere need to know about the incredible inefficiency of text-based information and the incredible effects of images (http://www.brainrules.net/vision)."

There is also a video that was created by students explaining their frustration with the lack of visual learning that takes place in the classroom.

Additional sections include:

* Use Visuals, Images, Data Visualizations, Infographics and Videos to Teach Concepts

* Use and Teach Learners How to Make Concept Maps and Graphic Organizers

* Use and Teach Learners How to Do Sketchnotes

* Allow and Encourage Learners to Show What They Know Through Visual Imagery

* Teach Visual Literacy

Jackie Gerstein provides a thought provoking post with links to additional resources. Take the time to read and consider how you might increase the use of visuals in your classroom. And if you have not read John Medina's book you might want to check out his website.

sherri jarrett's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:02 AM

In our world today we are surrounded by visuals. Yet we walk into many classrooms and see many written texts that often have few visuals. This post begins with a quote from John Medina, the author of Brain Rules (and a developmental molecular biologist). He states "We are incredible at remembering pictures. Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%. Professionals everywhere need to know about the incredible inefficiency of text-based information and the incredible effects of images (http://www.brainrules.net/vision)."

There is also a video that was created by students explaining their frustration with the lack of visual learning that takes place in the classroom.

Additional sections include:

* Use Visuals, Images, Data Visualizations, Infographics and Videos to Teach Concepts

* Use and Teach Learners How to Make Concept Maps and Graphic Organizers

* Use and Teach Learners How to Do Sketchnotes

* Allow and Encourage Learners to Show What They Know Through Visual Imagery

* Teach Visual Literacy

Jackie Gerstein provides a thought provoking post with links to additional resources. Take the time to read and consider how you might increase the use of visuals in your classroom. And if you have not read John Medina's book you might want to check out his website.

Mark Cottee's curator insight, August 2, 2015 7:08 PM

In our world today we are surrounded by visuals. Yet we walk into many classrooms and see many written texts that often have few visuals. This post begins with a quote from John Medina, the author of Brain Rules (and a developmental molecular biologist). He states "We are incredible at remembering pictures. Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%. Professionals everywhere need to know about the incredible inefficiency of text-based information and the incredible effects of images (http://www.brainrules.net/vision)."

There is also a video that was created by students explaining their frustration with the lack of visual learning that takes place in the classroom.

Additional sections include:

* Use Visuals, Images, Data Visualizations, Infographics and Videos to Teach Concepts

* Use and Teach Learners How to Make Concept Maps and Graphic Organizers

* Use and Teach Learners How to Do Sketchnotes

* Allow and Encourage Learners to Show What They Know Through Visual Imagery

* Teach Visual Literacy

Jackie Gerstein provides a thought provoking post with links to additional resources. Take the time to read and consider how you might increase the use of visuals in your classroom. And if you have not read John Medina's book you might want to check out his website.

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Announcing Simple Mode – Creating a PowToon just got 150x Easier

Announcing Simple Mode – Creating a PowToon just got 150x Easier | Education | Scoop.it
Every so often a tool is created that is so different and so unbelievably useful that it actually changes the way society functions. First came the spork – it scooped and punctured at the same time. Then came the remote control – you could watch TV and maneuver drones with a single click. Next was …

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:42 AM

PowToon allows learners to create animations...and they recently released a new version, Simple Mode, that makes it easier to use. Click through to the post to learn all the details.

You may also be able to get a free account with PowToon if you are an educator. They are giving away $10 million dolllars worth of free accounts. For information on this go to this link.

Monica Lamelas's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:06 AM

PowToon allows learners to create animations...and they recently released a new version, Simple Mode, that makes it easier to use. Click through to the post to learn all the details.

You may also be able to get a free account with PowToon if you are an educator. They are giving away $10 million dolllars worth of free accounts. For information on this go to this link.

Lexie Darrough's curator insight, June 9, 2016 3:24 PM

I want to learn more about this! 

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5 Good TED Ed Lessons to Foster Students Creative Thinking - Educators Technology

5 Good TED Ed Lessons to Foster Students Creative Thinking - Educators Technology | Education | Scoop.it
The theme of this week’s list of TED Ed lessons is creativity. We have meticulously selected five excellent videos from the collection that embeds over 30 videos. We tried to include videos that approach creativity from different perspectives. From learning how to write descriptively to exploring the ways scientists’ creativity made our world healthier and better, students will get to engage with challenging ideas and insights that will definitely spark their creative thinking

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Le FLE à la Une: Les tâches ménagères

Le FLE à la Une: Les tâches ménagères | Education | Scoop.it
"Le français est une langue à vocation universelle."

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Making MAKEing More Inclusive

Making MAKEing More Inclusive | Education | Scoop.it
The maker movement and maker education, in my perspective, are such great initiatives - really in line with what student-centric education should be in this era of formal and informal learning. Mak...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 21, 2015 6:32 AM

Jackie Gerstein has a number of posts that look at the Maker Movement, and in this post she discusses looks at two issues within the movement that have come to her attention through social media (quoted from post):

* Maker movement initiatives are often driven by more affluent white males.

* The maker movement is too often being associated with the tech stuff – Arduinos, Littlebits, Makey-Makeys – stuff that less affluent schools and community programs can afford.

Gerstein shares evidence that addresses each of these issues and then moves on to discuss how we can provide learners with maker opportunities at minimal costs. This portion of the post is divided into three sections:

* Changing Perceptions about Stuff

* Changing Perceptions about What Activities are Considered Making

* Changing Perceptions: Making is about a Mindset and a Process Not About Stuff

Her bottom line, let's focus on the act of making. If you are considering adding a maker corner to your classroom next year, or have the opportunity to work with learners this summer and would like them to become a part of the maker movement, take the time to peruse this post.

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:51 AM

Jackie Gerstein has a number of posts that look at the Maker Movement, and in this post she discusses looks at two issues within the movement that have come to her attention through social media (quoted from post):

* Maker movement initiatives are often driven by more affluent white males.

* The maker movement is too often being associated with the tech stuff – Arduinos, Littlebits, Makey-Makeys – stuff that less affluent schools and community programs can afford.

Gerstein shares evidence that addresses each of these issues and then moves on to discuss how we can provide learners with maker opportunities at minimal costs. This portion of the post is divided into three sections:

* Changing Perceptions about Stuff

* Changing Perceptions about What Activities are Considered Making

* Changing Perceptions: Making is about a Mindset and a Process Not About Stuff

Her bottom line, let's focus on the act of making. If you are considering adding a maker corner to your classroom next year, or have the opportunity to work with learners this summer and would like them to become a part of the maker movement, take the time to peruse this post.

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A New Visual Search Engine - Athenir

A New Visual Search Engine - Athenir | Education | Scoop.it
Research better. Feel better

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John Evans's comment, June 29, 2016 9:04 AM
Just tried to access the site and it seems to have been shut down.
Karen E. Belter's comment, June 29, 2016 10:56 AM
The Athenir sire is closed.
Dennis Swender's curator insight, October 26, 2016 12:40 PM
Site is no longer in operation - but the concept insight lends itself to further entrepreneurship
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How do we prepare the students of today to be tomorrow’s digital leaders?

How do we prepare the students of today to be tomorrow’s digital leaders? | Education | Scoop.it

"To understand the extent to which the skills taught in education systems around the world are changing, and whether they meet the needs of employers and society more widely, Google commissioned research from The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). The EIU surveyed senior business executives, teachers and students."


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Paul Franco's curator insight, June 5, 2015 2:27 PM

Muy bueno!!!!

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, June 7, 2015 5:56 PM

Preparing our students with the necessary skills for post-secondary career and college is critical, but especially for our poverty students.  Too often, school is the only venue to provide these thinking, collaboration, and problem solving skills. However, many poverty schools under the pressure of standardized testing are stuck in a remediation routine of filling gaps in content, reading, and math.  We must provide time for teachers to collaborate and plan integrated lessons that integrate these higher level thinking skills into their content areas. 

Katie Catania's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:10 AM

What skills do learners need today to be prepared to be a leader as they move through school and into careers? Google commissioned a study and this post provides a short video that discusses key findings as well as a link to the final report, Driving the Skills Agenda: Preparing Students for the Future.

The Executive Summary provides a number of key findings, including the ones listed below. (The text below is quoted from the report.)

* Problem solving, team working and communication are the skills that are currently most in demand in the workplace.

* Education systems are not providing enough of the skills that students and the workplace need.

* Some students are taking it into their own hands to make up for deficiencies within the education system.

* Technology is changing teaching, but education systems are keeping up with the transformation rather than leading it.

The full report provides additional information, including a number of visuals as well as case studies. As educators it is important that we consider the skills our learners will need in the future, and this report provides insight into some of what will be needed.

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A Visual on Learning Progression

Great learning progression visual.


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 2015 10:23 PM

Take a look at this visual that describes the learning progression. It looks at three questions as the starting point:

* What's the learning outcome for the lesson?

* How will I know if students have achieved it?

* How will I check if students have achieved it?

A variety of ideas are shared for each of these questions...short and sweet, and great for visual learners.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 16, 2015 6:11 PM

Thx Beth Dichter

Ra's curator insight, June 18, 2015 6:16 AM

Great graphic for teachers to identify the strength of their learning intentions and outcomes.

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Education Through Students' Eyes: A Dry-Erase Animated Video

Education Through Students' Eyes: A Dry-Erase Animated Video | Education | Scoop.it

"Two students from Georgia share their what education looks like through their eyes with a dry-erase animated video."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 18, 2015 6:40 AM

Listen to two softmores present their views on education in this short (~6 minute) video. What do they talk about? Here are the five points listed in the original post:

* Teachers’ view versus students’ view of school schedules.

* School systems’ expectations of students versus students’ own expectations of themselves.

* Purpose, application, and importance of certain curricula.

* The practice of not asking the most important people of all…the students.

* Ignoring successful educational models, such as Finland.

Many of us have seen education go through major changes, and these students raise some questions that all of us need to consider. Take the time to view this video, and consider sharing it with others at your school. 

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:45 AM

Listen to two softmores present their views on education in this short (~6 minute) video. What do they talk about? Here are the five points listed in the original post:

* Teachers’ view versus students’ view of school schedules.

* School systems’ expectations of students versus students’ own expectations of themselves.

* Purpose, application, and importance of certain curricula.

* The practice of not asking the most important people of all…the students.

* Ignoring successful educational models, such as Finland.

Many of us have seen education go through major changes, and these students raise some questions that all of us need to consider. Take the time to view this video, and consider sharing it with others at your school. 

Frances's curator insight, February 8, 2016 8:57 AM

Q:  At what age do students formulate their views of what "education" should be?

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True Facts About Teens and Media, Now & Then (Infographic)

True Facts About Teens and Media, Now & Then (Infographic) | Education | Scoop.it
The meteoric rise in technology over the past three decades has completely changed the relationship between teens and media. Teens are often the first group to adopt a new technology.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 22, 2015 6:23 AM

How has teenagers use of social media changed over the past 20 years? Learn more from this infographic which looks at the years 1995, 2005 and 2015. Teens are often the first to adopt new technology, but their patterns have changed over the years. The infographic shares information on social life and social media over the three decades and also looks at how teens are using social media today, specifically discussing Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, tumblr, and YikYak.

This post may be one to share with other faculty as well as parents, and could lead to an interesting discussion with teens in your classroom.

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Here's What Scientists Aren't Telling Us About Learning

Here's What Scientists Aren't Telling Us About Learning | Education | Scoop.it
It's rare for educators to be kept in the scientific loop, and rarer still to encounter research that might actually compel us to change our teaching hab

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:26 PM

Um pouco de ciência para enriquecer as estratégias de aprendizagem de adultos. #avancee 

Katie Catania's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:09 AM

Research continues to learn more about how we learn, but it is not always easy to find. This post, by informEd, provides 10 suggestions based on current research, and each is discussed in more detail in the post. Below are three of the findings.

* To learn quickly, don't concentrate so hard. Over thinking can make it harder to learn.

* It matters what your learning environment looks like. Did you know that physical characteristics, "such as air quality, colour, and light" can together impact the learning process of primary students by as much as 16% in a single year."

* Understanding a student's learning process occupies the same space in the brain as practicing empathy. I suspect we have all experienced frustration when working with students, but to provide feedback that will help them empathy also plays a role.

This post provides seven additional insights that may make a difference in your classroom. Click through to learn more about research on how we learn.

Monica Lamelas's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:08 AM

Research continues to learn more about how we learn, but it is not always easy to find. This post, by informEd, provides 10 suggestions based on current research, and each is discussed in more detail in the post. Below are three of the findings.

* To learn quickly, don't concentrate so hard. Over thinking can make it harder to learn.

* It matters what your learning environment looks like. Did you know that physical characteristics, "such as air quality, colour, and light" can together impact the learning process of primary students by as much as 16% in a single year."

* Understanding a student's learning process occupies the same space in the brain as practicing empathy. I suspect we have all experienced frustration when working with students, but to provide feedback that will help them empathy also plays a role.

This post provides seven additional insights that may make a difference in your classroom. Click through to learn more about research on how we learn.

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How Technology is Changing the Way People Learn

How Technology is Changing the Way People Learn | Education | Scoop.it

"We can make all sorts of assumptions about the way technology is changing learning, but what does the science actually say? According to Alfred Spector, Google’s vice president of research, it says a lot. For example, virtual tutors have helped average students reach the top 2% of their course; video games provide immersive environments that take the bordedom out of studying; and social networks are being used to increase interaction between students."



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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 15, 2015 10:56 PM

Technology...some argue for it and others against it, but was does the research say? This post explores current research. Sections include:

* Better at maths, worse at reading - In short, "edtech applications boost mathematics achievement, especially when individualized computer-assisted instruction is involved."

* More games, bigger brains - Research shows that playing video games can make an impact on the brain. One study cited stated "a robust positive association between the cortical thickness and video game duration in teens who invested the most time in games." Two areas of the brain, the prefrontal cortex (responsible for decision making and self-control) and the Frontal Eye Fields (which govern visual-motor processing) showed cortical matter increases.

* Selective knowledge, shallow creativity - This section discusses how technology may make it easier for us to recall information. Are we potentially "outsourcing our knowledge to digital tools"?

What do you think? Many schools are moving towards 1-to-1 digital devices to help students learn. Will this improve their outcomes at school? This post explores some of the issues that may help us choose the best ways to use digital tools, and when it may be better to approach learning using other methods.

Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 16, 2015 8:56 AM
Beth Dichter's insight:

Technology...some argue for it and others against it, but was does the research say? This post explores current research. Sections include:

* Better at maths, worse at reading - In short, "edtech applications boost mathematics achievement, especially when individualized computer-assisted instruction is involved."

* More games, bigger brains - Research shows that playing video games can make an impact on the brain. One study cited stated "a robust positive association between the cortical thickness and video game duration in teens who invested the most time in games." Two areas of the brain, the prefrontal cortex (responsible for decision making and self-control) and the Frontal Eye Fields (which govern visual-motor processing) showed cortical matter increases.

* Selective knowledge, shallow creativity - This section discusses how technology may make it easier for us to recall information. Are we potentially "outsourcing our knowledge to digital tools"?

What do you think? Many schools are moving towards 1-to-1 digital devices to help students learn. Will this improve their outcomes at school? This post explores some of the issues that may help us choose the best ways to use digital tools, and when it may be better to approach learning using other methods.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 16, 2015 9:08 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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The Benefits of Being Curious |

The Benefits of Being Curious | | Education | Scoop.it

"Evidence continues to emerge about the benefits of being a curious, interested person. Curious people tend to experience greater satisfaction with their lives, greater cognitive ability and increased memory function. Check out our latest infographic below for more information on the benefits of being curious."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 18, 2015 8:29 AM

Curiosity. What makes a learner curious? This infographic looks at this and includes the following sections:

* What we Know About Curiosity?

* Famously Curious People

* Curiosity: Good for the Mind and The Soul

* Feed Your Curiosity...Feed Your Brain

* The Curious Mind on Overload

As we work with our learners it is important to include activities that will ignite their curiosity. In all likelihood they will be more engaged with their work and be open to learning, asking questions and more. This infographic packs quite a bit of information into one visual piece.

sherri jarrett's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:02 AM

Curiosity. What makes a learner curious? This infographic looks at this and includes the following sections:

* What we Know About Curiosity?

* Famously Curious People

* Curiosity: Good for the Mind and The Soul

* Feed Your Curiosity...Feed Your Brain

* The Curious Mind on Overload

As we work with our learners it is important to include activities that will ignite their curiosity. In all likelihood they will be more engaged with their work and be open to learning, asking questions and more. This infographic packs quite a bit of information into one visual piece.

José Díaz-Pintado's curator insight, January 5, 2016 11:21 AM

añada su visión ...#SCEUNED15

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Growth/Fixed Mindset, Math Practices, Standards Based Grading Visuals

Growth/Fixed Mindset, Math Practices, Standards Based Grading Visuals | Education | Scoop.it
Instead of writing a syllabus or creating assessments or working on lessons plans, I have procrastinated and scoured some images from the web to make these. I have uploaded .png's of these into thi...

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Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:43 AM

If your learners are fans of Star Wars, then these posters may find a place in your classroom. You will find not only the image above (which is on Growth Mindset), but also an image of The Dark Side, otherwise knows as a Fixed Mindset.

In addition, there is a poster 8 Mathematical Processes of Jedi Masters, as well as one on Standards Based Gradings (an assessment tool). To go directly to a page that allows you to download the images click here.

Katie Catania's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:06 AM

If your learners are fans of Star Wars, then these posters may find a place in your classroom. You will find not only the image above (which is on Growth Mindset), but also an image of The Dark Side, otherwise knows as a Fixed Mindset.

In addition, there is a poster 8 Mathematical Processes of Jedi Masters, as well as one on Standards Based Gradings (an assessment tool). To go directly to a page that allows you to download the images click here.

Cathy Coghlan's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:30 AM

If your learners are fans of Star Wars, then these posters may find a place in your classroom. You will find not only the image above (which is on Growth Mindset), but also an image of The Dark Side, otherwise knows as a Fixed Mindset.

In addition, there is a poster 8 Mathematical Processes of Jedi Masters, as well as one on Standards Based Gradings (an assessment tool). To go directly to a page that allows you to download the images click here.