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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Justice, Homeland Security, and Emergency Preparedness
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Five things we learnt about cybercrime at Norfolk and Suffolk Police’s Project Breach event

1. Small businesses are most at risk

Around 80% of firms hit by cybercrime are small.

Although it is the large multi-nationals which make the headlines when they are breached many businesses which do not think they are big enough to target are on the receiving end.

Companies with out of date websites which were often made a several years ago and then ignored can be easy targets as they have not updated their protection.

2. The bad grammar in those phishing emails is intentional.

Most of us will have received an email asking us to send money for spurious reasons, and these are often easy to spot due to the spelling mistakes.

Mr Maskall said: “People think it is because the persons ending it can’t speak English but actually it is intentional.

“If you are sending out a million emails and getting 126 responses, you know those people who haven’t noticed the errors are more likely to be susceptible.”

3. Rubber duckys, LAN turtles and wifi pineapples exist.

Despite their colourful names these devices all have potential to cause harm. A rubber ducky looks like a USB drive but can take control of your computer remotely or install software without you knowing, within seconds of being plugged in.

A LAN turtle is disguised as a USB ethernet adapter for you to plug in your internet cable and can access all the information sent through it.

A pineapple allows a hacker to disguise it as a trusted wifi connection, for example your favourite coffee shop, then asks you to pop in an email address and password.

4. By the time you detect the breach it may already be too late.

The average time between a business being compromised and the discovery of an attack is 140 days. Often these discoveries are made by third parties such as the media or a company’s clients.

5. If you only used pornographic websites you would be safer on average.

While adult websites may have a reputation for being dodgy, in actuality you are more likely to pick up malicious software or viruses from other sites which have been compromised themselves.

Last year several reputable websites, including the BBC, had infected adverts placed on them which installed ransomware on visitors computers.

These programmes lock a user’s harddrive and victims must pay the hacker to remove the programme or risk losing their files and data.


Via Rob Duke
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Scooped by Mihaela Patrascu
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UK's Chief Constable Sara Thornton on creating a police force of the future - Centre for Public Impact

UK's Chief Constable Sara Thornton on creating a police force of the future - Centre for Public Impact | Law | Scoop.it
The changing nature of crime means some change and transition for the police is inevitable
Transformation is about investing now to save money later...
Collaboration, or "shared interdependency", occurs through shared capabilities and platforms
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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Welfare, Disability, Politics and People's Right's
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We must not withdraw from the European convention on human rights

We must not withdraw from the European convention on human rights | Law | Scoop.it
Cherie Booth: The European court isn't just for Abu Qatada and life-sentence prisoners. It serves us all, deserving and otherwise, like the NHS

Via britishroses
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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Guest post - Forensic linguistics: 'anonymizing' and challenging the authority of expert witnesses

Guest post - Forensic linguistics: 'anonymizing' and challenging the authority of expert witnesses | Law | Scoop.it
A fascinating guest post today from Dr Tim Grant, Senior Lecturer in Forensic Linguistics at Aston University in the UK, and the Director of the Centre for Forensic Linguistics there.  His main res...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Lingua Greca Translations
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New open-access journal on language and law

New open-access journal on language and law | Law | Scoop.it
Language and Law / Linguagem e Direito is a new free, exclusively online peer-reviewed journal to be published twice a year.  The Editors are Malcolm Coulthard, Universidade Federal de Santa Catari...

Via Catherine Christaki
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Guidance for taking statements and a copy of statements - a Freedom of Information request to Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Guidance for taking statements and a copy of statements - a Freedom of Information request to Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) | Law | Scoop.it

Could you send me any guidance that is issued to police for taking police statements from the public ? Do you give copies of statements made to police to the people who gave them?

Yours faithfully,

Nick Redwood

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Justice secretary urged to investigate contracts for interpreting firms

Justice secretary urged to investigate contracts for interpreting firms | Law | Scoop.it
Unite regional officer Andy Murray said: “What we have here is an example of a company, Pearl Linguistics that has gone into liquidation because, it appears, it was unable to operate in a contract culture even when underpinned by depressed wages.

“The cost-cutting across the sector is driving highly competent interpreters away from the profession as they can’t afford to live on the wages on offer.

“The people that are going to suffer are those needing assistance when going to NHS appointments and those appearing in court.”

Unite, which embraces the National Union of British Sign Language Interpreters (NUBSLI), said that interpreters, skilled in difficult languages and dialects, were being paid as little as £12-an-hour, while the NUBSLI  recommended freelance rates for fully qualified interpreters in London are £260-a-day.

Unite has been taking legal advice about the possibility that interpreting agencies are abusing their dominant position in the marketplace.

Andy Murray added: “The government has an obsession, bordering on mania, with outsourcing to private companies what should be publicly-run services.

“These companies promise that they will make the contract run more smoothly while implementing so-called ‘efficiency savings’ – but the biggest cost element is staff wages and these are then slashed

“Unite is calling on justice secretary Liz Truss to review the outsourcing of interpreter contacts, so that a first class service is delivered to often vulnerable clients, without a race to the bottom when it comes to wages, and terms and conditions for those providing these specialist skills.

“We are currently taking legal advice relating to the dominant position that these firms currently enjoy.”
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Unite supports calls to Scrap the Frameworks!

Unite supports calls to Scrap the Frameworks! | Law | Scoop.it

When NUBSLI first set up their #ScrapTheFramework campaign, raising issues around sustainability and the use of framework agreements, some felt that they were scaremongering.

But a recently leaked insolvency document by Pearl Linguistics, the company that went into liquidation several weeks ago, leaving the BSL community without access to many public services, including NHS healthcare, vindicates NUBSLI’s fears and highlights the fact that these frameworks are simply unworkable.The document clearly exposes the race to the bottom being forced through by government and the lack of consideration shown for both service users and workers.

There are currently three main national frameworks that the campaign is aware, Crown Commercial services, Ministry of Justice and the NHS Shared Business Services. Our campaign calls for them to be scrapped with immediate effect.

They are not  robust or fit for purpose safeguarding is not guaranteed standards of access will fall there is no choice or control for users will be damaging to SMEs (small and medium sized businesses), creating a monopoly 

They do not allow for equality of access if under-qualified personnel are used organisations advising the government are potential suppliers and have commercial interests
They are not cost effective and will not save taxpayers money
Contracts taken under Crown Commercial Services (CCS), NHS Shared Business Services (NHS SBS) and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) frameworks do not offer value for money and are often leaving Deaf people without interpreters as bookings go unfulfilled. Pearl Linguistics going into liquidation highlights the problems with privatisation and demonstrates that local provision and booking interpreters directly are the best way forward.

What you can do?

WRITE TO YOUR MP ABOUT THE FRAMEWORK AGREEMENTS
Find out who your MP is at Write to them and contact them directly to express your concerns.

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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Legal In General
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The Krays, Dennis Nilsen – and Chris Grayling: a conversation with Sir Ivan Lawrence QC

The Krays, Dennis Nilsen – and Chris Grayling: a conversation with Sir Ivan Lawrence QC | Law | Scoop.it
I’m standing with Sir Ivan Lawrence QC in a narrow room at his Pump Court chambers, examining an oil painting sent to him from Broadmoor by his former client the…

Via Jacqui Gilliatt
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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Forensic Linguistics
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Forensic Linguist As Detective & Expert Witness: an Inaugural Lecture by Professor Malcolm Coulthard

Linguists are frequently asked to help the police and courts when there is a dispute over the authorship of a written text -- suicide note, abusive or threat...

Via Hulya Kocagul
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Forensic Linguistics - Open Culture

Forensic Linguistics - Open Culture | Law | Scoop.it
Malcolm Coulthard teaches Forensic Linguistics at Aston University, Birmingham. And, in case you're wondering what this means, forensic linguistics is all.
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Rescooped by Mihaela Patrascu from Language, society and law
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Forensic Linguistics on US radio's The Diane Rehm Show

Forensic Linguistics on US radio's The Diane Rehm Show | Law | Scoop.it
Emails, texts and tweets may be changing how we solve crimes: Word choice, spelling and punctuation can all serve as virtual fingerprints. A look at how technology is changing criminal linguistic evidence in court.

Via Tim Grant
Mihaela Patrascu's insight:

Linguistics as virtual fingerprints

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Tim Grant's curator insight, April 3, 2015 2:04 AM

US Radio show featuring Natalie Schilling, Jim Fitzgerald and Larry Solan discussing forensic linguistics