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How can minority languages survive in the digital age?

How can minority languages survive in the digital age? | Language Unit | Scoop.it
The Guardian
How can minority languages survive in the digital age?

Via Rafael Scapin, Ph.D.
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5 Good Reasons to Raise Your Children Bilingual - Language Mastery

5 Good Reasons to Raise Your Children Bilingual - Language Mastery | Language Unit | Scoop.it
Are you a parent seeking ways to improve your child's future academic and professional prospects? Read on to see how being bilingual can give your children a leg up in today's hyper-competitive world.

Via Estelblau, Maya Sakakibara
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Translation in the European Union – Facts and Figures 2013

Translation in the European Union – Facts and Figures 2013 | Language Unit | Scoop.it
The translation flow is an enormous challenge to the EU. A serious amount of workforce is engaged as permanent or temporary staff, as trainees, freelancers and contractors.

Via Doud Martens
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50 awesome facts about LANGUAGES | INFOGRAPHIC

50 awesome facts about LANGUAGES | INFOGRAPHIC | Language Unit | Scoop.it

Via Monica Mirza, Luciana Viter, Estelblau, Maya Sakakibara
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Monica Mirza's curator insight, February 26, 2014 11:28 AM

Definitely "figures-stuffing"... nevertheless (thus ??) interesting, and I'm sure various exercises might be built upon this infographic : let me think... let's say this scoop's "in progress", I'll check for activities later on :o)

Daniel Compton's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:27 AM

Neat stuff on languages

Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 2014 12:26 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think

5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think | Language Unit | Scoop.it
A look at the ways that the construction of language can have implications for the way we think, act and parse the world around us.

Via Meryl Jaffe, PhD
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Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, February 20, 2013 11:26 PM
Thank you Salah for the visit and rescoop.
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, February 21, 2013 10:26 AM
Thank you Mithuhassan and Sally DeCost for your visits and rescoops.
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, February 27, 2013 2:34 PM
Thankyou Interpreterpaul for the visit and rescoops.
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Why It's Time To Learn Another Language

Why It's Time To Learn Another Language | Language Unit | Scoop.it
I often hear language learning is much easier when you are younger, and that we must teach our young students another language when they are young so that they can be ‘more competitive’ in an increasingly globalized, connected world.

Via Rafael Scapin, Ph.D.
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BandKids13-14's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:18 AM

This shows that not only is leaning a language useful in communication, but can also improve the mind. By learning a second language, you have a better memory and a longer attention span. Bilingual individuals show symptoms of Alzheimer's and memory loss later than monolingual individuals. So learning a new language is very beneficial in many aspects and highly recommended to learn.~Rayann

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Are African languages important for education? — SOS Children

Are African languages important for education? — SOS Children | Language Unit | Scoop.it
It’s now widely accepted that nursery and primary school children do best when taught in their mother tongue. But what about for older children in Africa, who normally learn in the national language? Laurinda Luffman investigates.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, February 1, 2014 2:55 AM

It’s now widely accepted that nursery and primary school children do best when taught in their mother tongue. But what about for older children in Africa, who normally learn in the national language? Laurinda Luffman investigates.

In Zambia, the government has just rolled out a new education programme which requires state schools to teach the youngest primary school pupils (grades 1–4) in their mother tongue. So in the capital, Lusaka, pupils in some areas returned to school this January and found their teachers giving lessons in Chewa (also known as Nyanja). This was the cause of great excitement for one young boy in Lusaka who admitted he found it easier to learn in the language he spoke at home.

This is a significant step for the Zambian government, though schools face many challenges to implement the new directive. According to Zambian teachers, the main problem is a lack of materials and resources in local languages, as well as a shortage of fluent speakers among staff at some schools.

But there’s no doubting the reasons behind the change. As early as 1953, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) urged African countries to educate children in their mother tongue. Numerous studies have shown that teaching in a child’s native language is one of the key factors in determining the quality of learning and educational achievement.

Starting with the mother tongue

The practice of teaching in the mother tongue has therefore been spreading across the African continent. UNESCO commissioned a survey in 2004 and found that 70–75% of learning in nursery and early primary years was conducted in African languages. However, only 176 different languages were represented, when there are well over a 1000 spoken across the continent as a whole. And by secondary, UNESCO found that only 25% of basic education was being taught in local languages, with just 5% at higher education level.

Many African parents, as well as African governments, believe it’s important for older pupils to be immersed in the official language of their country, particularly when this language is internationally recognised. So for example, in Rwanda, while Kinyarwanda (spoken by most Rwandans) is used for the main language of instruction during the first three years at primary school, from grade 4 onwards primary school pupils should be taught in English. End-of-primary school exams are also set in English.

Since French was the official main language in Rwanda up until 2008, the country’s education system has had to cope with huge changes over recent years in the shift to English. A shortage of qualified English-speaking teachers and a lack of resources and materials in English have been the main problems. However, the Rwandan government is firm in its belief that pupils should adopt English as early as possible. English is seen as important for building a new unified national identity and ensuring that Rwandans can take advantage of growing trade with the Anglophone East African Community, as well as internationally.

Only time will tell

But the fact remains that only around 4% of Rwandan families speak English at home. And those who do tend to be in the capital or other main cities, while the majority of rural Rwandans continue to use Kinyarwanda. Taking secondary school entrance exams in English at grade 6 therefore proves immensely challenging for many children and some educationalists say the adoption of English discriminates against a whole sector of rural Rwandan society.

Francissen Textwriting En Uebersetzung's curator insight, February 2, 2014 2:27 AM

Off course, evry language you learn from your mother is important

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Dog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dog is the common use term that refers to members of the subspecies Canis lupus familiaris ( canis, "dog"; lupus, "wolf"; familiaris, "of a household" or "domestic").

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